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Dionysos Rising: The Birth of Cultural Revolution Out of the Spirit of Music

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E. Michael Jones Following up his best-seller, Degenerate Moderns, Jones reveals how major figures connected with modern music projected their own immorality into the field of music which has been the main vehicle of cultural revolution in the West. For the first time ever, a unified theory of music and cultural revolution links the work of figures like Wagner, Nietzsche, E. Michael Jones Following up his best-seller, Degenerate Moderns, Jones reveals how major figures connected with modern music projected their own immorality into the field of music which has been the main vehicle of cultural revolution in the West. For the first time ever, a unified theory of music and cultural revolution links the work of figures like Wagner, Nietzsche, Schönborg, Jagger and others to show the connection between the demise of classical music and the rise of rock 'n' roll. Beginning with Nietzsche's appropriation of Wagner's opera Tristan and Isolde, music became the instrument for cultural upheaval. What began at the barricades of Dresden in 1849 found its culmination at Woodstock and Altamont and the other Dionysian festivals of 1969. Jones shows the connection between the death of classical music and the rise of the African sensibility which Nietzsche saw as the antidote to Wagner prostrating himself before the cross in Parsifal. Nietzsche prophesied the end of the age of Christ/Socrates and the return of the spirit of music to philosophy. That return took place at the end of 1969 at an abandoned racetrack outside of San Francisco, and the world has never been the same. "And a man who has not 'music' in him is apt to disintegrate states since music is equally suggestive of personal love or political concord." - G. Wilson Knight, The Shakespearean Tempest


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E. Michael Jones Following up his best-seller, Degenerate Moderns, Jones reveals how major figures connected with modern music projected their own immorality into the field of music which has been the main vehicle of cultural revolution in the West. For the first time ever, a unified theory of music and cultural revolution links the work of figures like Wagner, Nietzsche, E. Michael Jones Following up his best-seller, Degenerate Moderns, Jones reveals how major figures connected with modern music projected their own immorality into the field of music which has been the main vehicle of cultural revolution in the West. For the first time ever, a unified theory of music and cultural revolution links the work of figures like Wagner, Nietzsche, Schönborg, Jagger and others to show the connection between the demise of classical music and the rise of rock 'n' roll. Beginning with Nietzsche's appropriation of Wagner's opera Tristan and Isolde, music became the instrument for cultural upheaval. What began at the barricades of Dresden in 1849 found its culmination at Woodstock and Altamont and the other Dionysian festivals of 1969. Jones shows the connection between the death of classical music and the rise of the African sensibility which Nietzsche saw as the antidote to Wagner prostrating himself before the cross in Parsifal. Nietzsche prophesied the end of the age of Christ/Socrates and the return of the spirit of music to philosophy. That return took place at the end of 1969 at an abandoned racetrack outside of San Francisco, and the world has never been the same. "And a man who has not 'music' in him is apt to disintegrate states since music is equally suggestive of personal love or political concord." - G. Wilson Knight, The Shakespearean Tempest

30 review for Dionysos Rising: The Birth of Cultural Revolution Out of the Spirit of Music

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ross Leavitt

    Dionysos Rising is about the role Wagner, Nietzsche, Schoenberg, and the rock artists of the 20th Century had in moving music away from a healthy mix of reason and emotion and toward a self-destructive, irrational frenzy. This one was dense and often hard to follow. There were a lot of new (to me) ideas in it and it will need a second reading to really process them. A major theme was Western liberals' association of Western culture with Christian values, and of African culture with a free, uninh Dionysos Rising is about the role Wagner, Nietzsche, Schoenberg, and the rock artists of the 20th Century had in moving music away from a healthy mix of reason and emotion and toward a self-destructive, irrational frenzy. This one was dense and often hard to follow. There were a lot of new (to me) ideas in it and it will need a second reading to really process them. A major theme was Western liberals' association of Western culture with Christian values, and of African culture with a free, uninhibited lifestyle. These perceptions led them to attempt to replace Western traditions with elements of African music, dress, and culture. Sometimes I wondered if he was over-generalizing, but the point is very thought-provoking. (Here's a "provoked thought" that Jones didn't address himself: much of contemporary Christianity believes that the church that has been refined through the centuries represents stale and institutional religion. In many ways, they also want to shed this heritage in favor of what they see as a more undeveloped, uninhibited culture coming from Africa.) Jones does often get bogged down in dramatic descriptions of the personal lives of his subjects. He also constantly makes confident statements about how life events influenced their work. Perhaps the connections he draws are valid, and perhaps not, but I often wasn't convinced that he had demonstrated these connections, rather than merely asserting them. I'm looking forward to more clarity from a second reading.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ian Hodge

    E. Michael Jones has a series of books analyzing contemporary culture and its roots. A key to this cultural analysis is the sexual revolution. Jones suggests that that revolution has come from various influence, and his various books trace those influences. In this book, he traces music from Richard Wagner through to modern times, showing how music itself reflects a growing atheism and an abandonment of order. Abolish creation and replace it with any kind of evolution by chance is to impose an ul E. Michael Jones has a series of books analyzing contemporary culture and its roots. A key to this cultural analysis is the sexual revolution. Jones suggests that that revolution has come from various influence, and his various books trace those influences. In this book, he traces music from Richard Wagner through to modern times, showing how music itself reflects a growing atheism and an abandonment of order. Abolish creation and replace it with any kind of evolution by chance is to impose an ultimate irrationalism in the universe. This irrationalism shows itself in the development of music in the later part of the 19th century into the contemporary, avant-garde, and abstractionism of the 20th century. Without rules there is no rationality to be displayed either in music or anything else. The author could have started earlier, with Beethoven, who suggested a goal was "no rules." The development of western music has been the slow abolition of form and harmony with an endless cacophony of sound that has emptied the concert halls around the world. By charting the history, Jones shows how music became a weapon in the culture wars by people who had as their agenda, the rejection of Christian morality. Perhaps it's time to change the music in our culture if there is to be genuine change.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matt Carpenter

    This book speaks to a subject that I had no idea about: how music was used to usher in the cultural revolution of the 1960's. It is well researched and easy to understand. Some background knowledge of modern European history would be helpful but it isn't required. If you ever wondered how music is used to shape a culture (for good or for evil), read this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    John

    Ultimately his methodology is selective, his historical connections are tenuous, and he refuses to acknowledge that the forces which lead to Wagner's leftism, which was Beethoven's transgressive social ideology and compositional philosophy. It's a start at picturing how Plato could think that the musical modes change the foundations of political society, but why does he give a soft ball to "good boy" Classical music? Wagner's an easy target for a post-WWII reader.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Stefan A Schoellmann

    as the back cover says: every good library should contain a copy. Insightful and non-judgmental of a well known Catholic.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cesar Hernandez, LC

    DNF (yet)

  7. 5 out of 5

    J Kevin Whear

    Insightful, scholarly and sometimes you will find yourself in deep waters, frightening connections drawn between Wagner, Nietzsche, Hitler, Charles Manson and Mick Jagger. The premise of the book is clear that music has served as the vehicle of revolution for the pass 150 years. We must stop and ask ourselves, where is this revolution going and who are its next victims.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    World class.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    read long ago - recall it was good

  10. 4 out of 5

    [貔貅] ☭

  11. 4 out of 5

    Walter M.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Powderburns

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gregory

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kasd

  16. 5 out of 5

    Danny

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

  18. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Factor

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chris Comis

  20. 5 out of 5

    Owen

  21. 4 out of 5

    Blair and Ben

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Cunningham

  24. 5 out of 5

    Eric Sauder

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Wight

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dealer

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cotton Mather

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sean Saunders

  29. 5 out of 5

    David

  30. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Cummings

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