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Pred školom malog irskog grada stoji velika crvena bukva. Na njenu koru će osmoro učenika u jednom trenutku mladosti urezati svoja imena. Njihovi životi krenuće različitim putevima, ali će sećanje na veliku bukvu i imena urezana u njenu koru biti večno... Njihove sudbine međusobno će se preplesti, a ljubavi, ljubomore, strasti i žudnje zauvek će im promeniti živote.


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Pred školom malog irskog grada stoji velika crvena bukva. Na njenu koru će osmoro učenika u jednom trenutku mladosti urezati svoja imena. Njihovi životi krenuće različitim putevima, ali će sećanje na veliku bukvu i imena urezana u njenu koru biti večno... Njihove sudbine međusobno će se preplesti, a ljubavi, ljubomore, strasti i žudnje zauvek će im promeniti živote.

30 review for The Copper Beech (BBC Audiobooks)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jaline

    There is something very special about Maeve Binchy’s writing. The first time I read one of her books it was 1990. In the 27 years since then she has continued to produce books that are in-depth explorations into people’s hearts and minds. She does not do this ruthlessly or clinically, like a surgeon making a deep cut. She does so with delicacy, sensitivity, and a garden of compassion. Are her books all rainbows and unicorns? Not by any stretch of the imagination. The endings are always positive a There is something very special about Maeve Binchy’s writing. The first time I read one of her books it was 1990. In the 27 years since then she has continued to produce books that are in-depth explorations into people’s hearts and minds. She does not do this ruthlessly or clinically, like a surgeon making a deep cut. She does so with delicacy, sensitivity, and a garden of compassion. Are her books all rainbows and unicorns? Not by any stretch of the imagination. The endings are always positive and affirming, but the pathway to the ending is layered with the grit and gravel of real life. Part of the specialness in her writing seems to me to be choice of language. For instance, there is a big difference between someone giving up on something out of disgust and giving up on something out of despair. One of them elicits far more empathy in this reader than the other. This particular book was presented in a series of character spotlights with all of them tying together. As in real life, each individual experienced their life and the other people in the village from their own perspective, through their own lenses, tinted by their own conditioning and growth. It is very deftly done and highlights yet again how people can live in the same place and share a moment, a decade, a life and yet experience it so differently. Perception is such an amazing force and probably doesn’t receive the respect – nor the fear, perhaps – that it deserves. The characters are all so well-done, and the story so satisfying, I couldn’t help but draw it out as long as I could. I really didn’t want it to end and I wouldn’t have minded being invited into even more of the villager’s homes, hearts, and minds. Reading this book felt like being cuddled in a big old comfy armchair; safe, secure, and blissfully knowing that no matter the trials and challenges the characters in the book encounter, all will be well in the end.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This is my favorite Maeve Binchy book that I've read to date. I've yet to find another person who feels the same way, so perhaps I'm the odd woman out, but I don't mind. I simply got immersed in the story and found it easy to relate to the characters especially Chris. I loved the idea that everyone thought what they knew what was going in the other characters lives, but it wasn't until you got to their respective chapters that you learned the truth....

  3. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    I have always loved Maeve Binchy's stories; she's such a marvelous storyteller. This book, set in a small Irish country village, follows a group of school children, from childhood through to parenthood. Their lives are entertwined, like many in small towns, but each of their stories hold secrets. The book was set from the 50's and ended in the 70's, and gives a good picture of life at that time in rural Ireland. The school that had seen generations of children walk through its doors, to carve th I have always loved Maeve Binchy's stories; she's such a marvelous storyteller. This book, set in a small Irish country village, follows a group of school children, from childhood through to parenthood. Their lives are entertwined, like many in small towns, but each of their stories hold secrets. The book was set from the 50's and ended in the 70's, and gives a good picture of life at that time in rural Ireland. The school that had seen generations of children walk through its doors, to carve their names on the giant beech it sat under, had stories to tell of its own, if it could only talk. Each chapter focused on one of the characters, and the tale was told from his/her perspective. This will be a reread for me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    'The Copper Beech' is a series of interwoven character studies, which tell different parts of a story of a small town community in Ireland, in the middle and late twentieth century. It opens with the description of a large beech tree, which gives shade in the grounds of a primary school. The school is being honoured with a visit from the Bishop, and we meet several characters from the town including some mischievous children. There are then several sections, each written from the perspective of 'The Copper Beech' is a series of interwoven character studies, which tell different parts of a story of a small town community in Ireland, in the middle and late twentieth century. It opens with the description of a large beech tree, which gives shade in the grounds of a primary school. The school is being honoured with a visit from the Bishop, and we meet several characters from the town including some mischievous children. There are then several sections, each written from the perspective of one of the people in the town. They usually start in the person's childhood, showing their upbringing and introducing some of their friends. There are ongoing threads too - who marries whom? Will Maura get her dream of a house of her own? What happens in Leo's family that makes her draw back from the rest of the community? It's very well written, with excellent characterisations. Perhaps a bit slow-moving at times, and certainly no great excitement or intrigue, but for someone like me who enjoys reading about people, a very enjoyable book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Hannigan

    One evening I went to visit with a neighbor who had just returned from another neighbor's house with 2 books and this was one of them. I mentioned that I loved Maeve Binchy and was sadden by her passing. My neighbor asked if I would like to borrow the book as she had the other book to read as well and I gratefully snatched it out of her hands. At 400+ pages, I wasn't sure how long it would take me to finish it--especially since I had a few library books that were due back soon. The next day my h One evening I went to visit with a neighbor who had just returned from another neighbor's house with 2 books and this was one of them. I mentioned that I loved Maeve Binchy and was sadden by her passing. My neighbor asked if I would like to borrow the book as she had the other book to read as well and I gratefully snatched it out of her hands. At 400+ pages, I wasn't sure how long it would take me to finish it--especially since I had a few library books that were due back soon. The next day my husband had business up in Seattle, so after dropping my son off at work I sat down and started reading "just for a few minutes"... Maeve had me at page one and I had the most delightful day in Ireland while sitting in my favorite chair (with moments of real life thrown in to pick my son up from work and to fix dinner). I finished the book at 11 pm with mixed emotions because I knew the next day would be very lonely indeed without these wonderful characters in my life for another day. As with all the books I have read by Ms Binchy, there is incredible sadness, but they end with a wonderful feeling of hope and happiness!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cheyenne Blue

    I had a Maeve Binchy phase, oh, about 20 years ago. She wrote these cosy books about an old fashioned Ireland, where people were quirky, knew everything about everyone, and were never nasty to each other. Bad things happened to good people, but they got past it. I outgrew Maeve, but from time to time I pick one up, for a pleasant re=read. The Copper Beech is one of her ensemble cast stories. She takes a central theme and weaves the individual stories around the centrepost. It's a bit like reading I had a Maeve Binchy phase, oh, about 20 years ago. She wrote these cosy books about an old fashioned Ireland, where people were quirky, knew everything about everyone, and were never nasty to each other. Bad things happened to good people, but they got past it. I outgrew Maeve, but from time to time I pick one up, for a pleasant re=read. The Copper Beech is one of her ensemble cast stories. She takes a central theme and weaves the individual stories around the centrepost. It's a bit like reading interconnected short stories rather than a novel. Her style and plots are predictable, stereotypes abound, and there's an underlying order to things that her characters seldom deviate from. People pair off neatly, reproduce on cue (or suffer madly before finding a suitable alternative), agonize over their lives, become stronger, get over it. The bad guys get their low-key just desserts. But most of her stories are set in the 1950s or earlier and so she gets away with it. Overall, I think she does better with her earlier works "Light a Penny Candle" for example, which follows one storyline and fewer characters. She's the macaroni cheese of Irish fiction and I love her for it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Leigh

    Great storyteller !!!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Clayton

    I have to admit that I sometimes get a sense of deja vu when starting any of Binchy's books. Her style is very much her own and taking any chapter from any of her books you can immediately tell it is a Bincky book. However, I think that that is one of the things that appeals to me about her as a writer. I read many modern novels that stretch the form and push the reader to re-evaluate our place on earth, etc., but when the world becomes just a tad to overbearing I always know I can open a Binchy I have to admit that I sometimes get a sense of deja vu when starting any of Binchy's books. Her style is very much her own and taking any chapter from any of her books you can immediately tell it is a Bincky book. However, I think that that is one of the things that appeals to me about her as a writer. I read many modern novels that stretch the form and push the reader to re-evaluate our place on earth, etc., but when the world becomes just a tad to overbearing I always know I can open a Binchy book to chapter one and fall right into her world of comfortable deeply-imagined characters. Copper Beach is actually a series of interrelated chapters(almost novellas) that examine each character in a small town in Great Britain. I really enjoyed how she connected the characters yet gave each one a major focus for a long period of time in the story.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Christine Killeen

    A great all around story; I love Maeve Binchy anyway, so it's hard for me to find a book of hers I don't like. I like the way she tells her stories; this one, like most, revolves almost entirely around different personalities, their secrets, actions, loves, hates, and how they all interact with each other. Complex, yet simple. The book spans almost 30 years, and you feel like you've been there all along as the characters grow and change. Nothing earth shattering, nothing overly gripping, just a A great all around story; I love Maeve Binchy anyway, so it's hard for me to find a book of hers I don't like. I like the way she tells her stories; this one, like most, revolves almost entirely around different personalities, their secrets, actions, loves, hates, and how they all interact with each other. Complex, yet simple. The book spans almost 30 years, and you feel like you've been there all along as the characters grow and change. Nothing earth shattering, nothing overly gripping, just a well told story of a small town, its schoolhouse, and the faces that have passed through.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kara Hansen

    I always enjoy the cozy stories from Maeve Binchy. This one was not my favourite~ I found some of the stories dragged on a little too long.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    In the close-knit Irish community of Shancarrig, there stands an old copper beech overlooking the schoolhouse. For years, the imposing tree has been both a silent spectator and a staunch supporter of the generations of students who have gone to school in Shancarrig. Eight children once carved their names - and the names of those who they loved - into the bark of the tree, as part of an annual tradition that takes place on the final day of school. And so, the old copper beech has kept the secrets In the close-knit Irish community of Shancarrig, there stands an old copper beech overlooking the schoolhouse. For years, the imposing tree has been both a silent spectator and a staunch supporter of the generations of students who have gone to school in Shancarrig. Eight children once carved their names - and the names of those who they loved - into the bark of the tree, as part of an annual tradition that takes place on the final day of school. And so, the old copper beech has kept the secrets of these former pupils; bearing the etchings of their myriad ambitions and hopeful dreams for the future within its trunk. These eight children have since become adults and are living their own lives. Yet the schoolhouse in Shancarrig still holds a special place in all of their hearts; as it is the schoolhouse that has shaped them and made them who they are. For each person, their hometown holds such special memories - some memories that are just too personal or private to ever be shared. However, the mighty copper beech has witnessed various declarations of love, hope, and identity - all the youthful dreams of the children who once played beneath its sheltering branches. Although they live such vastly different lives, these eight dreamers can certainly agree on one thing about the bucolic and peaceful town of Shancarrig: life is dull; some might even say deadly dull. From Ryan's Hotel to Barna Woods, where the gypsies set up their campsites each year, from Nellie Dunn's bustling little sweet shop to Father Gunn's quiet parish church; the pace of life in tiny Shancarrig is placidly uneventful. And the community seems to prefer it that way. However, for some more passionate souls - such as Nessa Ryan - there must be more to life in Shancarrig than running the family hotel. Yet if Nessa could just peel back the various layers of serenity - if she could see beyond the calm exterior of life in Shancarrig - she would see so much unexpected drama: the schoolhouse's headmistress, Maddy Ross has a secret love; Eddie Barton has developed a surprising friendship with someone through the mail; and Maura Brennan has discovered that she has a curious kinship with a glamorous couple - Mike and Gloria Darcy - recent newcomers to Shancarrig. In this picturesque little town, where the river runs around the great rock for which the town is named, human life flows along in all its variety. Lives intertwine in much the same way as names crisscross on the trunk of that sturdy copper beech. Yet, from the cottages where Foxy Dunne and his family live in poverty; to the grand house where Leonora 'Leo' Murphy lives; and for the Kellys', who live near the school; as well as the town physician, Dr. Jims Blake, who lives on The Terrace - nothing is as it seems. For now, the secrets that have long been hidden deep in Shancarrig's shadows are being brought back into the light. I must say that I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. As I know I have said before, I absolutely love Maeve Binchy as an author. In my opinion, she writes such poignant stories and develops such personable characters that I found myself truly connecting with as I read further along in the book. I also appreciate that her plots are never just the 'chocolate box' variety - the 'feel good, happily ever after' type plots and stories. Ms. Binchy's stories aren't always wrapped up in a nice, neat little bow. I love her writing style precisely because I find it to be more realistic and true to life. I would definitely give this book an A+!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    A huge copper beech tree sits in the school yard in Shancarrig and everyone has weitten their names in the tree through out the years. From ryan's Hotel to Barna Woods, where the gypsies came each year, from Nellie Dunn's sweet shop to FatherGunn's church, the tenor of life in this small Irish village is outwardly placid and uneventful. Nessa Ryan would say it was deadly dull. But, behind the calm exterior, serenity fades into unexpected drama. Maddy Ross has a secret love; Eddie Barton a surpri A huge copper beech tree sits in the school yard in Shancarrig and everyone has weitten their names in the tree through out the years. From ryan's Hotel to Barna Woods, where the gypsies came each year, from Nellie Dunn's sweet shop to FatherGunn's church, the tenor of life in this small Irish village is outwardly placid and uneventful. Nessa Ryan would say it was deadly dull. But, behind the calm exterior, serenity fades into unexpected drama. Maddy Ross has a secret love; Eddie Barton a surprising friendship and the Darcys, the glamorous newcomers, find a curious partner in prro Marua Brennan. At the cottages,where the Dunnes live in poverty, the grand house of Leo Murphy, the Kellys near the school, Dr. Jim's on The Terrace...nothing is as it seems.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I picked up this book simply because its author was Irish--I'm into all things Irish these days. The author tells the stories, one at a time, of eight schoolchildren in a small Irish village who carve their initials on graduation day into the huge copper beech tree beside the school. The stories intertwine and build on each other. Some characters were likeable, others not, which I'm sure was the intent of the author, but it shows how you never know what life will bring.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kristy

    Love Maeve Binchy! Another feel-good tale.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Obsidian

    It's funny, I think I read this one eons ago (back in the mid-2000s) but I never got into it. At least I can say that nothing read as familiar to me when I started this. I thought that the way that Binchy balances all of the characters, and then we get to see them in the end, adults, married, with children was great. I always want to know what happens next in a story, so we get a little of that here. Binchy divides up the book and focuses on certain characters in the village of Schancarrig. We st It's funny, I think I read this one eons ago (back in the mid-2000s) but I never got into it. At least I can say that nothing read as familiar to me when I started this. I thought that the way that Binchy balances all of the characters, and then we get to see them in the end, adults, married, with children was great. I always want to know what happens next in a story, so we get a little of that here. Binchy divides up the book and focuses on certain characters in the village of Schancarrig. We start off with Father Gunn, then we move to Madeline Ross (known as Maddy) which also introduces Father Barry. We have other adults in this one, Dr. Jims and Nora Kelly but they are in the mix of when the school children are introduced. After them, we move to the children who go to Schancarrig school. First we have Maura, then Eddie, Nessa, and Leo. We also have another character who is not one that went to the school, Richard. He is related to one of the characters we hear about in this story, Niall. We don't get Niall's POV in this though. I have to say that out of everyone I liked Nessa's and Leo's stories the most. Probably because Nessa gets to see a different side to her mother's relationship with her father, and she realizes that it's better for her to give her strength to someone who needs it/her instead of throwing herself away on someone who doesn't deserve her. Leo's story was heart wrenching. Her family gets twisted upside down and she is forced to keep a secret that haunts her. I did love how the village reprobate Foxy made good and how he was hell-bent on marrying Leo. I thought it was odd though that Binchy didn't switch Foxy in for Richard's story. One of the main reason's why I gave it 4 stars. Maddy's story was a hot mess. Dealing with an overbearing mother, she throws her all into being an assistant teacher, and then her friendship with Father Barry who is another mess. Her ending was not happy at all, and I liked how Binchy looped her back in the end. I really liked the writing in this one. You really have to pay attention to what is going on while reading this since you get hints of thing to come in other people's stories. Also Binchy does a wonderful job of looping things back. For example, you don't know what caused Leo to suddenly change how she was personality wise. You just know that other characters remark upon it. Eventually you do find out while reading Leo's story. The flow was good too, though some of the individual stories, I was a little bored with like Richard and Eddie. Eddie's story gets better by the end, but the beginning of his tale was slow. Richard I didn't like at all, and it was odd that was even included I though except it gave us insights into two other characters, Nessa and a woman we hear mentioned a lot, Mrs. Gloria Darcy. The setting is Shancarrig in the 1960s. When the book ends we are in 1970 I think or at least 1971. The book focuses on the school (the old stone house) and the tree that the children wrote their initials on as they grew up (the copper beech). The ending leaves things on a hopeful note for all of the characters except for Richard and Maddy.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Roberta

    BOOK # 1000 on my 'read' list! Woot-woot.... a long time coming but a worthy celebration! I really loved the way that this story wove in and around the characters! In some ways, it was like a collection of short stories in that the author would focus on one person and their particular situation and then move onto the next person. However, each and every character showed up in the stories of the other characters. Being set in a small Irish village, it was easy to have many of the villagers make a BOOK # 1000 on my 'read' list! Woot-woot.... a long time coming but a worthy celebration! I really loved the way that this story wove in and around the characters! In some ways, it was like a collection of short stories in that the author would focus on one person and their particular situation and then move onto the next person. However, each and every character showed up in the stories of the other characters. Being set in a small Irish village, it was easy to have many of the villagers make appearances here and there--some significant and some insignificant--and the blending of their lives was seamless. And, it had a very moving and happy ending! I love a surprise ending, but I really love a satisfying ending! Well done and worth reading.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Yvonne

    Good study of a small town.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stasha

    I cannot say that it was my favourite Binchy yet but I must say that it was quite interesting. I liked the way that the author broke down the novel according to the several characters who made the story what it was. I also liked the fact that when an event occured with one character, more details were provided in another chapter based on a supporting character. At times the novel was difficult to put down as the story was so appealing, despite the fact that there was no great particular event pe I cannot say that it was my favourite Binchy yet but I must say that it was quite interesting. I liked the way that the author broke down the novel according to the several characters who made the story what it was. I also liked the fact that when an event occured with one character, more details were provided in another chapter based on a supporting character. At times the novel was difficult to put down as the story was so appealing, despite the fact that there was no great particular event per se. At times, I questioned what the purpose of the Copper Beech tree was to the story, but by book's end, I realised that it had had a significant impact on the lives of the people in Shancarrig at one point or another. I think it symbolised for them the secrets that many of them kept, or rather, it served as a backdrop to the interwoven relationships in the story. I found it interesting that the school had been put up for sale in the end, and that so many of the main characters were willing to purchase it.However,I was very happy about the unanimous agreement about it in the end.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cait

    I have been reading Maeve Binchy books since I was a teenager and for as long as I can remember, Tara Road has always been my favourite. Well today that all changed when I finished "The Copper Beech." My new favourite Binchy book. The Copper Beech is an incredible compilation of short stories about the people living in the small town of Shancarrig. The stories describe their lives, hopes, feelings, secrets, fears and loves. Though there are 8 stories of different people, they are all woven toget I have been reading Maeve Binchy books since I was a teenager and for as long as I can remember, Tara Road has always been my favourite. Well today that all changed when I finished "The Copper Beech." My new favourite Binchy book. The Copper Beech is an incredible compilation of short stories about the people living in the small town of Shancarrig. The stories describe their lives, hopes, feelings, secrets, fears and loves. Though there are 8 stories of different people, they are all woven together. Each character pops up in the lives of the others. 1 community, 8 tales. I devoured this book and wanted to know more about my favourite characters. And that is why I love Maeve Binchy so much. That is why she is my favourite author. She completely satisfies me with her writing and always leaves me wanting to know more.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

    An unusual narrative taking the reader from the beginning of the story, with the people involved being mostly children, through several formative years of their lives separately, adding extra details like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle until finally you realise the bigger picture. I found the plot easy to follow, and there were plenty of surprises, but not unreasonable ones. The only thing this book lost a star for was that the ending, where the characters' story joins back into each other's and we f An unusual narrative taking the reader from the beginning of the story, with the people involved being mostly children, through several formative years of their lives separately, adding extra details like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle until finally you realise the bigger picture. I found the plot easy to follow, and there were plenty of surprises, but not unreasonable ones. The only thing this book lost a star for was that the ending, where the characters' story joins back into each other's and we find out what they are doing as successful (or not) adults. I had been quite moved by the happiness, sadness, and by the determination of the characters' main stories, but I guess I hoped for a happy ending all round! Maybe I should stop being a big baby and change it to five stars...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Maeve Binchy had a nice way of taking a lot of diverse characters and pulling them together to create a complete picture of a town or community. I found this interesting throughout. It struck me how much everyone thought they knew about one another, when in fact each person was deeper and different than believed. I think that is true of "real life" as well. We all have depths that few are able or take the time to plumb.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sandrus

    Not bad but I didn't enjoy it as much as I did with the other ones I have read from this author.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    A chronicle of the intersecting lives of a small Irish town, Maeve Binchy's Copper Beech presents the everyday sorrows and joys of individuals and the supportive power of community. While the book is more a loose assortment of narrative strands than a tightly-plotted novel, each individual character maintains the reader's attention. In the book, Dr. Jims Blake reflects that "There was a human story everywhere he turned...in the small houses and in the big ones," and this idea best characterizes A chronicle of the intersecting lives of a small Irish town, Maeve Binchy's Copper Beech presents the everyday sorrows and joys of individuals and the supportive power of community. While the book is more a loose assortment of narrative strands than a tightly-plotted novel, each individual character maintains the reader's attention. In the book, Dr. Jims Blake reflects that "There was a human story everywhere he turned...in the small houses and in the big ones," and this idea best characterizes Binchy's storytelling. Whether the characters are major or minor, each of them has a unique and very human backstory that transports readers to the little town of Shancarrig.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tricia

    I have read a few of Maeve Binchy's books and this one is the best so far. It centres around a small community and a school with a beech tree. Like many of her books it is not really a story as such, but more a collection of tales told from the perspective of different characters and all the tales intertwine. Each story brings an extra part to the tale so you get a more complete picture of what is happening in the town.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hayley

    I’m giving this 5 stars based on my memory of reading it 10+ years ago and looooving it. I’ve been searching for a copy for a number of years now to reread it and see if I’d still love it as an adult.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    Pure comfort read. Full of Irish charm, I discovered Maeve Bincy at 13 and loved her

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Another story of a small Irish town; each chapter told from a different person's perspective, covering some of the same events but diving deeper into the experiences of each person when it's his or her chapter.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    I ❤️ Maeve Binchy books!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Deacon Tom F

    Great Read. Intimate Irish stories of life.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Barb

    Maeve Binchy’s stories are always so full of insight into the “human condition”—-just enjoyable reading.

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