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Memoir of the Life and Public Services of Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, F.R.S., &C. &C., Particularly in the Government of Java, 1811-1816, Bencoolen ... and Selections From His Correspondence. V. 2

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CHAPTER XIII. Sir Stamfords arrived ai Bencoolen — Improvement in the feelings of the inhabitants — State of affairs in the Eastern Archipelago requires him to proceed to Bengal—Wrecked on the passage—At-iention of the Government already directed to the subject of the Dutch encroachments—Lord Hastings determines on another line impolicy, and to secure the command of the Str CHAPTER XIII. Sir Stamfords arrived ai Bencoolen — Improvement in the feelings of the inhabitants — State of affairs in the Eastern Archipelago requires him to proceed to Bengal—Wrecked on the passage—At-iention of the Government already directed to the subject of the Dutch encroachments—Lord Hastings determines on another line impolicy, and to secure the command of the Straits of Malacca — Sir Stamford appointed Agent to the Qovernor-General for this purpose — Account of the discovery of the Tapir—Departure from Calcutta — Anticipation of Singapore as the spot for the new settlement—Arrival at Penang—Proceeds doum the Straits of Ma^ lacca — hoists the British flag at Singapore — Acheen — Decides on the right of the crown — Description of Acheen—Reformation introduced at Bencoolen — Journeys — General politics — Conquest of Java — The flrst convention for the unconditional restoration of it to the Dutch — only communication from Europe—Representations made in England — Apprehensions realised on return to India—Borean States — Dutch at Palembang — Acheen affairs — Title to the occupation of Singapore — Bible Society—Opinions of Captain Horsburgh and Mr. Carnegie on the settlement of Singapore — Accident to the vessel offRhio, On his return to Bencoolen Sir Stamford had the satisfaction to find that a general impression prevailed with those committed to his charge^ that the object of his government was to promote a spirit of enterprise among them as indi-viduals^ to give the utmost freedom to cultivation^ to extend the commerce of the country, and to advance the happiness of the people in general. It would have been delightful to him to have remained with them, desirous a» they appeared to be to promote his views for their welfare; but the larger national interest in the Eastern Archipelago required his immediate attention. On his arrival in Sumatra he had foreseen that it would be necessary for him to have personal communication with the Bengal government on this subject; and he therefore thought it advisable to proceed at once to Calcutta. It is only necessary to state, that Sir Stamford embarked in a very small vessel, which had no better accommodation than one small cabin, with only a port-hole to admit air, where centipedes and scorpions roved about without interruption : but personal convenience was never considered by him if it interfered with duty, and no better opportunity was likely to occur. The vessel lost a mast in the Bay of Bengal, and, owing to a drunken pilot, was literally upset in the middle of the night upon a dangerous bank at the mouth of the river Hoogley, where Sir Stamford was obliged to remain until boats were sent from Calcutta to take him out of the vessel. Sir Stamford found that the measures which he adopted in Sumatra, in particular the general protest which he had made against the Netherlands' authority on the occasion of its interference at Palembang, bad attracted the atten- SIR Stamford's arrival at Calcutta. tion of the Governor-Greneral in Council: and as the Netherlands' Government had submitted to the same authority its appeal against the part which he had taken^ the question was fairly before the Bengal Government. Fortunately the Government of Prince of Wales' Island had at length, on the transfer of Malacca to the Dutch, been awakened to the dangerous consequences which must have ensued to the interests of that Island, and the eastern trade generally; and their representations had the e£Pect of corroborating and confirming all Sir Stamford's previous apprehensions and statements.


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CHAPTER XIII. Sir Stamfords arrived ai Bencoolen — Improvement in the feelings of the inhabitants — State of affairs in the Eastern Archipelago requires him to proceed to Bengal—Wrecked on the passage—At-iention of the Government already directed to the subject of the Dutch encroachments—Lord Hastings determines on another line impolicy, and to secure the command of the Str CHAPTER XIII. Sir Stamfords arrived ai Bencoolen — Improvement in the feelings of the inhabitants — State of affairs in the Eastern Archipelago requires him to proceed to Bengal—Wrecked on the passage—At-iention of the Government already directed to the subject of the Dutch encroachments—Lord Hastings determines on another line impolicy, and to secure the command of the Straits of Malacca — Sir Stamford appointed Agent to the Qovernor-General for this purpose — Account of the discovery of the Tapir—Departure from Calcutta — Anticipation of Singapore as the spot for the new settlement—Arrival at Penang—Proceeds doum the Straits of Ma^ lacca — hoists the British flag at Singapore — Acheen — Decides on the right of the crown — Description of Acheen—Reformation introduced at Bencoolen — Journeys — General politics — Conquest of Java — The flrst convention for the unconditional restoration of it to the Dutch — only communication from Europe—Representations made in England — Apprehensions realised on return to India—Borean States — Dutch at Palembang — Acheen affairs — Title to the occupation of Singapore — Bible Society—Opinions of Captain Horsburgh and Mr. Carnegie on the settlement of Singapore — Accident to the vessel offRhio, On his return to Bencoolen Sir Stamford had the satisfaction to find that a general impression prevailed with those committed to his charge^ that the object of his government was to promote a spirit of enterprise among them as indi-viduals^ to give the utmost freedom to cultivation^ to extend the commerce of the country, and to advance the happiness of the people in general. It would have been delightful to him to have remained with them, desirous a» they appeared to be to promote his views for their welfare; but the larger national interest in the Eastern Archipelago required his immediate attention. On his arrival in Sumatra he had foreseen that it would be necessary for him to have personal communication with the Bengal government on this subject; and he therefore thought it advisable to proceed at once to Calcutta. It is only necessary to state, that Sir Stamford embarked in a very small vessel, which had no better accommodation than one small cabin, with only a port-hole to admit air, where centipedes and scorpions roved about without interruption : but personal convenience was never considered by him if it interfered with duty, and no better opportunity was likely to occur. The vessel lost a mast in the Bay of Bengal, and, owing to a drunken pilot, was literally upset in the middle of the night upon a dangerous bank at the mouth of the river Hoogley, where Sir Stamford was obliged to remain until boats were sent from Calcutta to take him out of the vessel. Sir Stamford found that the measures which he adopted in Sumatra, in particular the general protest which he had made against the Netherlands' authority on the occasion of its interference at Palembang, bad attracted the atten- SIR Stamford's arrival at Calcutta. tion of the Governor-Greneral in Council: and as the Netherlands' Government had submitted to the same authority its appeal against the part which he had taken^ the question was fairly before the Bengal Government. Fortunately the Government of Prince of Wales' Island had at length, on the transfer of Malacca to the Dutch, been awakened to the dangerous consequences which must have ensued to the interests of that Island, and the eastern trade generally; and their representations had the e£Pect of corroborating and confirming all Sir Stamford's previous apprehensions and statements.

2 review for Memoir of the Life and Public Services of Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, F.R.S., &C. &C., Particularly in the Government of Java, 1811-1816, Bencoolen ... and Selections From His Correspondence. V. 2

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