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What’s a sweets-loving young boy growing up gay in North Carolina in the eighties supposed to think when he’s diagnosed with type 1 diabetes? That God is punishing him, naturally. This was, after all, when Jesse Helms was his senator, AIDS was still the boogeyman, and no one was saying, “It gets better.” And if stealing a copy of an x-rated magazine from the newsagent was a What’s a sweets-loving young boy growing up gay in North Carolina in the eighties supposed to think when he’s diagnosed with type 1 diabetes? That God is punishing him, naturally. This was, after all, when Jesse Helms was his senator, AIDS was still the boogeyman, and no one was saying, “It gets better.” And if stealing a copy of an x-rated magazine from the newsagent was a sin, then surely what the guys inside were doing to one another was much worse. Sweet Tooth is Tim Anderson’s uproarious memoir of life after his hormones and blood sugar both went berserk at the age of fifteen. With Morrissey and The Smiths as the soundtrack, Anderson self-deprecatingly recalls love affairs with vests and donuts, first crushes, coming out, and inaugural trips to gay bars. What emerges is the story of a young man trying to build a future that won’t involve crippling loneliness or losing a foot to his disease—and maybe even one that, no matter how unpredictable, can still be pretty sweet.


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What’s a sweets-loving young boy growing up gay in North Carolina in the eighties supposed to think when he’s diagnosed with type 1 diabetes? That God is punishing him, naturally. This was, after all, when Jesse Helms was his senator, AIDS was still the boogeyman, and no one was saying, “It gets better.” And if stealing a copy of an x-rated magazine from the newsagent was a What’s a sweets-loving young boy growing up gay in North Carolina in the eighties supposed to think when he’s diagnosed with type 1 diabetes? That God is punishing him, naturally. This was, after all, when Jesse Helms was his senator, AIDS was still the boogeyman, and no one was saying, “It gets better.” And if stealing a copy of an x-rated magazine from the newsagent was a sin, then surely what the guys inside were doing to one another was much worse. Sweet Tooth is Tim Anderson’s uproarious memoir of life after his hormones and blood sugar both went berserk at the age of fifteen. With Morrissey and The Smiths as the soundtrack, Anderson self-deprecatingly recalls love affairs with vests and donuts, first crushes, coming out, and inaugural trips to gay bars. What emerges is the story of a young man trying to build a future that won’t involve crippling loneliness or losing a foot to his disease—and maybe even one that, no matter how unpredictable, can still be pretty sweet.

30 review for Sweet Tooth: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Elite Indie

    Tim Anderson had me in tears, not sad tears (though his life could have been sad with what he had to deal with), but tears of pure mirth. This memoir, primarily a coming of age story from a closeted homosexual, diabetic, awkward boy into a openly homosexual, severely diabetic, awkward man kept me reading. His honest portrayal of raging hormones,the discovery of his sexuality and the terrifying truth of it was expertly crafted to make his reader extremely uncomfortable, but also hysterical. I pic Tim Anderson had me in tears, not sad tears (though his life could have been sad with what he had to deal with), but tears of pure mirth. This memoir, primarily a coming of age story from a closeted homosexual, diabetic, awkward boy into a openly homosexual, severely diabetic, awkward man kept me reading. His honest portrayal of raging hormones,the discovery of his sexuality and the terrifying truth of it was expertly crafted to make his reader extremely uncomfortable, but also hysterical. I pictured him shoving stolen porn down the front of his pants, dripping sweat, guilt hanging his shoulders, fantasizing increasingly unlikely love scenarios with incredibly straight dudes.It was painful to read, in the sense that it reminded of my wild teenage imagination and the heartbreak that often accompanied it, as I was inevitably let down. Anderson bares all in this memoir, which is sure to endear him to readers of many persuasions and tastes. If you like funny, you will like this book. His crazy diabetic episodes have got to be the most embarrassing, gripping tidbits I've ever read. Thank you, Tim, for sharing your awkwardness honestly. It really made this equally awkward reviewer's week to experience your life, which must have been a lot harder than you let on in this comedic portrayal.

  2. 5 out of 5

    WhatAStrangeDuck

    Had I not known that this is not fiction I would have been constantly on the edge of my seat for fear that our protag literally is too stupid to live. But as the author lived to tell the tale I wasn't worried (much). This is a hilarious recounting of the author's life as a teenager and a young man. I loved reading about his bumbling through life. It's a rare talent to be able to make the reader really feel all the horrific teenage-angst and real fear of dying but at the same time keeping them bel Had I not known that this is not fiction I would have been constantly on the edge of my seat for fear that our protag literally is too stupid to live. But as the author lived to tell the tale I wasn't worried (much). This is a hilarious recounting of the author's life as a teenager and a young man. I loved reading about his bumbling through life. It's a rare talent to be able to make the reader really feel all the horrific teenage-angst and real fear of dying but at the same time keeping them belly-laughing. I have to admit that I probably had a special fondness for the book because so many of the pop culture references are just up my alley because I'm pretty much the same age as the author. Highly recommended.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    Thank you NetGalley and Lake Union Publishing for a copy of the ebook. “Sweet Tooth” is fun, funny and full of raging hormones. Having read and enjoyed Anderson’s previous memoir “Tune in Tokyo,” I was excited to delve into this. This book ranges from the time Tim was fifteen until his 26th birthday. Anderson pokes fun at two personal tragedies in his life, learning to live with type 1 diabetes and being an awkward and closeted gay, horny teen. The chapters in the book alternate with accounts of Thank you NetGalley and Lake Union Publishing for a copy of the ebook. “Sweet Tooth” is fun, funny and full of raging hormones. Having read and enjoyed Anderson’s previous memoir “Tune in Tokyo,” I was excited to delve into this. This book ranges from the time Tim was fifteen until his 26th birthday. Anderson pokes fun at two personal tragedies in his life, learning to live with type 1 diabetes and being an awkward and closeted gay, horny teen. The chapters in the book alternate with accounts of Anderson’s low blood sugar episodes which read in a dreamy way like someone who is high and incoherent. Tim is a free spirit looking for a good time which usually involves attractive men. The “good time” is hard for him to find as a teenager, but things start to look up as he becomes a man. I rooted for Tim and I worried about Tim while reading this memoir. He makes fun of everything which is enjoyable, but he didn’t always take care of his diabetes well and was lonely for love at times. There were many pop culture references that music lovers of the 80’s and early 90’s will appreciate. I think this book will appeal to fans of David Sedaris and to those who aren’t squeamish or prudish when it comes to sex.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    I wanted to read Sweet Tooth because my sixteen year old son has Type I Diabetes, the same as Tim Anderson. Mr. Anderson (oh no, I’m having Matrix flashbacks!) begins his memoir when he is diagnosed at the age of fifteen. Strangely enough, that was also around the time that Tim discovered that he’s gay. Two major life changes at the same time. Many adults couldn’t handle a one-two punch like that as well as Tim Anderson did as a teenager. Want to know how he got through it? His sense of humor. T I wanted to read Sweet Tooth because my sixteen year old son has Type I Diabetes, the same as Tim Anderson. Mr. Anderson (oh no, I’m having Matrix flashbacks!) begins his memoir when he is diagnosed at the age of fifteen. Strangely enough, that was also around the time that Tim discovered that he’s gay. Two major life changes at the same time. Many adults couldn’t handle a one-two punch like that as well as Tim Anderson did as a teenager. Want to know how he got through it? His sense of humor. Tim Anderson is funny and self-deprecating and able to see the humor in almost any situation. Sweet Tooth takes place in the South in the 1980s. It was the beginning of the AIDS crisis and the height of the Moral Majority’s power. One of the worst times and places to come out as a gay teenager. The music was good though. I am a little bit older than Tim Anderson, so many of the musical references were unfamiliar to me, but he depended heavily on the musical influences of the time. Almost as much as he did on his sense of humor. There was a song for every occasion and meaning in every lyric. He bonded with friends over musical artists and rejected other potential friends because they had different musical tastes. Tim was well aware of the life altering side effects of Type I Diabetes (T1D) and they were driven home with terrifying clarity repeatedly in the book. As the mother of a child with T1D, I was alarmed at the way Tim dealt with his health. The carelessness with which he treated his disease. As a citizen of the USA, I was pissed for him when he couldn’t get insurance to cover his diabetic testing supplies. That’s right, think what you may about Obama care, but at least today men, women and children with T1D don’t have to go without testing supplies and guestimate their insulin dosage. Doing this can cause deadly complications. Aside from being alarmed and pissed, I was also lifted up. To see how well Tim Anderson dealt with life and love; both in the face of T1D and his burgeoning sexuality was like a breath of fresh air after this long winter we’ve had. He took chances, but what teenager doesn’t think he is ten feet tall and bullet proof? He made stupid mistakes, but which of us hasn’t? The bottom line is that he took what at that time in history were two strikes against him, and he hit a homerun. The treatment of T1D has made major strides in the last thirty years. I don’t have to tell any of you how far the gay equality movement has come in that same time. I was rooting for Tim the whole time. Watching him come out slowly, to one person at a time and seeing it get easier each time he said the words “I’m gay” gives credence to the It Gets Better motto. I hoped he would get his health under control and keep it that way. I hoped he would find true love and have his happily-ever-after. There is a sequel to Sweet Tooth, so I guess I can go find out how he did it!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    One of the things I love about memoirs, whether they are from someone you have heard about before or not, is how they can get you thinking about your own life. It's amazing how reading the narration of another life, can make you rethink yours, how it can bring memories to the front of your mind that you haven't thought of in years. I'm always surprised and overjoyed when something will trigger one of my memories, especially when they revolve around sex. Within the first 25 pages of Sweet Tooth, One of the things I love about memoirs, whether they are from someone you have heard about before or not, is how they can get you thinking about your own life. It's amazing how reading the narration of another life, can make you rethink yours, how it can bring memories to the front of your mind that you haven't thought of in years. I'm always surprised and overjoyed when something will trigger one of my memories, especially when they revolve around sex. Within the first 25 pages of Sweet Tooth, I had already thought of a porn magazine and a church crush, both of which I hand't thought of in years. I was a little younger than Tim the first time I stole a porn magazine, and sadly it wasn't an actual gay porn one, but it was Playgirl, and I got the same sort of thrill that he had when I got the courage up to stick it down the back of my jeans, and hide it under my shirt. I can even remember the first time I was alone somewhere, and a bear skin rug was involved, so I could look at it and do what every man does on a regular basis. It was the first time I really admitted to myself that the sight of a naked man, did it for me. It was scary, electrifying, and self affirming all at the same time. As far as the crush goes, I had a huge crush on my pastor's son. Terry Kent was older, I think he was either a Senior in high school, or a Freshman in college when I first laid eyes on him, and he invaded my dreams for a very long time after that. One of those dreams involved the baptismal, but you guys don't want those details. Sadly nothing ever happened, except for a short shoulder rub at church camp, but that touch was enough for me, it was the fuel for fantasies for months afterwards. When I remembered Terry Kent, I looked him up on Facebook for the first time, and I must say, he didn't age very well. Sweet Tooth is one of those memoirs that I think anyone who has ever had an awkward adolescence, and who hasn't, should read. It reaffirms the idea that while all of us are unique and have different lives from one another, we all share a core set of experiences that allows us to relate in ways that we tend to overlook in our day to day lives. It's the kind of story that helps to remind us that we all share a common humanity, and I want to thank Tim Anderson for sharing his story, and reminding me of that.

  6. 4 out of 5

    H.M. Jones

    This book is the kind of book you will find yourself being annoying with. To be precise, you will be laughing too loudly anywhere you read this: in the bathroom, in the library, on your couch, at school. This book is funny, humiliating, awkward and strange. At the same time, it's like so many coming of age books, and is good because it is relatable. Am I a homosexual teen with raging hormones? No, but I was once a hetero teen with raging hormones, and, though the road is a lot smoother for strai This book is the kind of book you will find yourself being annoying with. To be precise, you will be laughing too loudly anywhere you read this: in the bathroom, in the library, on your couch, at school. This book is funny, humiliating, awkward and strange. At the same time, it's like so many coming of age books, and is good because it is relatable. Am I a homosexual teen with raging hormones? No, but I was once a hetero teen with raging hormones, and, though the road is a lot smoother for straight folks, the problems are similar. Learning to be an adult, to love like an adult and to juggle our own flaws can be difficult, but mostly, it is very funny, if you only have the sense of humor to see it that way. And Tim Anderson has the best sense of humor. Great read all around. Give this book a try. You won't regret it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Valerity (Val)

    Sweet Tooth: A Memoir (Kindle Edition) I liked this memoir of a youth who painfully discovers that he not only has a thing for hot guys, but he also has Type I diabetes. Now this was several decades back, when it was way more of a time consuming drag to have Type I diabetes, not to mention hard on your social life if you were lucky enough to have one. But Tim manages to find ways to work it to his advantage at times, as you will find, sometimes with comical outcomes.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Metcalf

    From the very first page Tim Anderson had me in the palm of his hands with his writing. It was unexpectedly good, it was witty, and within the first chapter it provided a distinct reason for the the title Sweet Tooth. As a boy Tim loved sugary treats. He almost never got them but craved them like nobody's business. At fifteen his worst fears become reality when he was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. Ahh, I thought, this is going to be a medically focused memoir. Then, just as quickly he progress From the very first page Tim Anderson had me in the palm of his hands with his writing. It was unexpectedly good, it was witty, and within the first chapter it provided a distinct reason for the the title Sweet Tooth. As a boy Tim loved sugary treats. He almost never got them but craved them like nobody's business. At fifteen his worst fears become reality when he was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. Ahh, I thought, this is going to be a medically focused memoir. Then, just as quickly he progressed into chatting about his overwhelming teen hormones and sexual fantasies of boys and men. Oh, so maybe it's more of a LGBT themed memoir I thought. In reality it was a mix of the two. Tim Anderson's memoir spanned just over a decade from the time he was fifteen through until he was twenty-six. In the early days as he struggled with his sexuality, his strong religious beliefs had him convinced his Diabetes diagnosis was God's way of punishing him, and he tried to resist his urges. Every step of the way I wanted things to turn out better for Tim than they actually did, and every step of the way he continued to goof up. It turns out he was not great at managing his disease as a teen and to be frank he got worse over time becoming blasé with his testing regime. That he lived to tell the story was comforting and his self deprecating tone allowed me to laugh out loud (whilst inwardly scalding him). He included a series of chapters titled "He's Lost Control" numbers one through ten and these detailed in a comic manner ten diabetic episodes where Tim's blood sugar levels became dangerously unmoderated - way too high or way too low. Coming out as a gay man, starting to venture into gay bars, searching for love or any kind of sexual activity really - all of these things were also relayed in an entertaining, albeit forthright manner. Whilst there's no way I condone his eating, drinking and drug taking behaviours especially when they so clearly jeopardised his already compromised health, I simply couldn't help taking his story in the spirit it was delivered. With all his 80's music and pop culture references and an epilogue I was delighted to read this book was quite simply a sweet surprise. Well done Tim on telling a difficult story in such an entertaining manner.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Randee

    Tim Anderson is a type 1 diabetic. I am a type 2 diabetic. Tim is gay; I am straight. Tim likes alternative music. I am a heavy metal type of girl. Nonetheless, I feel like we could be besties after reading his memoir. I really liked it, I really liked him. Part quest for sex/love, part medical tome on the intricacies of navigating diabetes (sometimes not so successfully) and part what it's like to be young and searching for yourself and letting all your insecurities hang out no matter how despe Tim Anderson is a type 1 diabetic. I am a type 2 diabetic. Tim is gay; I am straight. Tim likes alternative music. I am a heavy metal type of girl. Nonetheless, I feel like we could be besties after reading his memoir. I really liked it, I really liked him. Part quest for sex/love, part medical tome on the intricacies of navigating diabetes (sometimes not so successfully) and part what it's like to be young and searching for yourself and letting all your insecurities hang out no matter how desperately you try to hide them. This felt so authentic and honest, I was actually comforted that my own youth with the challenges of trying to be cool often getting the best of me was shared, at least, by one other member of the homo sapien species. Upon finishing, I immediately downloaded to my Kindle, his book "Tune in Tokyo" and will soon read it. Everyone that knows me knows that I am crazy for Japan...Japanese movies, TV, authors, culture, fashion, visual kei, bands...I could go on and on. It appears that Tim and I may have something here we mutually like and I want to hear everything he has to say about it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alysa H.

    There's a feeling I get whenever I encounter the memoirs of non-famous people with whose work I'm not familiar. That question of "So, why do I care about [name of person] enough to read a book about their life?" In the case of Tim Anderson's Sweet Tooth, that question is basically a moot point, because the writing is so hilarious that I can see myself reading this book a dozen times and always laughing out loud. And despite the specificity of his late-1980s/early-1990s struggles as a gay diabetic There's a feeling I get whenever I encounter the memoirs of non-famous people with whose work I'm not familiar. That question of "So, why do I care about [name of person] enough to read a book about their life?" In the case of Tim Anderson's Sweet Tooth, that question is basically a moot point, because the writing is so hilarious that I can see myself reading this book a dozen times and always laughing out loud. And despite the specificity of his late-1980s/early-1990s struggles as a gay diabetic high school (and later college) student, there is quite a lot of universality to the way he depicts the awkwardness of growing up and dealing with one's adolescent angst. Things that happen to one's teenaged self often feel like epic tragedies while they're occurring, but years later those things take on comical tones. It's not nice to laugh at other people's pain, but laughing WITH other people at their former selves, in retrospect, can be a lovely and cathartic experience. It's like that trend in Open Mic nights where adults read aloud from their ancient middle-school diaries. Although I'm almost a decade younger than Anderson, there wasn't a single pop-culture reference that I didn't get (though this might not be the case for readers with different musical tastes). The only real criticism I would give is that the official book description misleads a little with its emphasis on Anderson's origins in North Carolina, when it could have been set practically anywhere in the U.S. because the book doesn't dwell on anything particularly "Southern". I received an ARC of this book via NetGalley.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    (4.5/5) "What's this clay sculpture you've made Tim?" "It's my dead pancreas. His name is Fran" A memoir of a young man named Tim, in the closet and coming to terms with diabetes. I could not put this book down, I just wanted more. The alternating chapters of Tim's low sugar episodes was refreshing among the main chapters. Filled with many 80's and 90's music references, great humor, the progression of a man coming out sexually; this was one hell of an enjoyable read (4.5/5) "What's this clay sculpture you've made Tim?" "It's my dead pancreas. His name is Fran" A memoir of a young man named Tim, in the closet and coming to terms with diabetes. I could not put this book down, I just wanted more. The alternating chapters of Tim's low sugar episodes was refreshing among the main chapters. Filled with many 80's and 90's music references, great humor, the progression of a man coming out sexually; this was one hell of an enjoyable read

  12. 4 out of 5

    Allan

    Sometimes entertaining, sometimes clichéd, this memoir about a type 1 diabetic growing up gay in North Carolina was worthwhile if a little repetitive at times. Did we need to learn of 10 separate diabetic episodes which resulted in the same outcome? A light read / listen.

  13. 5 out of 5

    S Wright

    This continues my streak of reading "funny" memoirs and then proceeding to read it without laughing all that much. I am going to chalk that up to the fact I haven't been enjoying much of anything I've been reading lately. So. I don't think that is on Tim Anderson. This was alright. I don't really have much to say. It's life. This continues my streak of reading "funny" memoirs and then proceeding to read it without laughing all that much. I am going to chalk that up to the fact I haven't been enjoying much of anything I've been reading lately. So. I don't think that is on Tim Anderson. This was alright. I don't really have much to say. It's life.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    Tim is a sweet angel I want to shower him with insulin and hugs.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Len

    My new favourite gay male author. Read Tune in Tokyo first and immediately had to go to this next and it didn't disappoint. I actually find him funnier than David Sedaris, and I want more!! My new favourite gay male author. Read Tune in Tokyo first and immediately had to go to this next and it didn't disappoint. I actually find him funnier than David Sedaris, and I want more!!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lulu

    Story: 9 First MC: 9 Second MC: N/A Secondary characters: 8 Mystery: 3 Sexual tension: 3 Humor: 8 Hotness: 2 Product placement: 6 Ridiculousness: 1 Annoying: 0 Audio: 10 (10h 6min) To re-read: 10 Even though its a memoir (which I never read) I really enjoyed it. And even though I don't like YA I like this, mainly because of the heavy dose of humor (only way I could finish a YA book) Starts when Tim is 15, gay boy with a very sweet tooth. It progresses to his life as a diabetic gay man. There are periods when Story: 9 First MC: 9 Second MC: N/A Secondary characters: 8 Mystery: 3 Sexual tension: 3 Humor: 8 Hotness: 2 Product placement: 6 Ridiculousness: 1 Annoying: 0 Audio: 10 (10h 6min) To re-read: 10 Even though its a memoir (which I never read) I really enjoyed it. And even though I don't like YA I like this, mainly because of the heavy dose of humor (only way I could finish a YA book) Starts when Tim is 15, gay boy with a very sweet tooth. It progresses to his life as a diabetic gay man. There are periods when he is lonely failing to find a boyfriend or someone to take for, but its never sad he takes it on stride (maybe for the sake of a book?) We don't get the impression that his life was sad; just hard. I laughed as his inner monologues, I wonder if he is like this in real life. Never knew the struggle diabetics face on daily basis. No sex scenes here. All off camera, we just know he has sex. finally! The audio was amazing! Authors: this is how to get the right narrator for your book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Full disclosure: I recieved a free copy of this as an ebook from netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I don't usually read memoirs, especially of people that I've never even heard of before. I don't know why I picked up this one as a 'read now' on netgalley. I'm chalking my interest up to the fact that I live in NC, and people are VERY homophobic here. Anyways. This was quite an engaging read- funny, light-hearted, self-depricating and thoughtful. Most teenagers wouldn't be able to handle Full disclosure: I recieved a free copy of this as an ebook from netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I don't usually read memoirs, especially of people that I've never even heard of before. I don't know why I picked up this one as a 'read now' on netgalley. I'm chalking my interest up to the fact that I live in NC, and people are VERY homophobic here. Anyways. This was quite an engaging read- funny, light-hearted, self-depricating and thoughtful. Most teenagers wouldn't be able to handle finding out that they are gay AND diabetic at the same time, on top of just trying to survive adolescence. This book just goes to show you that having a sense of humor about your situation and being able to laugh at yourself will carry yoyu far in life, and get you through many troubles. I would definitely recommend this book. It's very humorous, thought provoking, and sometimes even sweet. (Pun intended. Very much so.)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    Kind of a bummer...honestly not that funny :( I had to keep reminding myself that Tim Anderson is not David Sedaris. I know that's kind of unfair, but the similarity in the gay/Southern voice just invites comparison. I did not really laugh out loud while reading, and I got pretty bored of the incessant 80s/90s music references. While I usually like reading about gay culture in the 80s, I found this memoir pretty boring :( Kind of a bummer...honestly not that funny :( I had to keep reminding myself that Tim Anderson is not David Sedaris. I know that's kind of unfair, but the similarity in the gay/Southern voice just invites comparison. I did not really laugh out loud while reading, and I got pretty bored of the incessant 80s/90s music references. While I usually like reading about gay culture in the 80s, I found this memoir pretty boring :(

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joann(san diego shutterbug)

    Positively loved this book. it had me laughing at the times i should not have been... Although some of the parts were sad the way the story was told was a good way for the story to be told. Very well written. Comedy at its best. It was great to see that he found his husband in then end. Even the credits were funny to read. i received this book as part of goodreads.com first read giveaways

  20. 4 out of 5

    David Morris

    Panic on the sweets of raleigh Far from a classic but a nice read never the less. It provides a sometimes disturbing insight into the life a young diabetic who also has the added pressure of deciding when to come out of the closet. It was interesting for myself ,as the main character was both the same age as me and we had very similar musical tastes.I also loved the fact that he briefly mentioned 'The Chameleons. Panic on the sweets of raleigh Far from a classic but a nice read never the less. It provides a sometimes disturbing insight into the life a young diabetic who also has the added pressure of deciding when to come out of the closet. It was interesting for myself ,as the main character was both the same age as me and we had very similar musical tastes.I also loved the fact that he briefly mentioned 'The Chameleons.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    Very Different Lots of laughs, lots of Head shaking thinking he's not that dumb, didn't know what an avocado was or that you didn't eat the rind. Loved sweets and diabetic, egad. An accident waiting to happen. Someone, a higher being was looking out for him because he never went into a coma. Whew, like watching a train wreck. It was still a good book, it was just very different. Very Different Lots of laughs, lots of Head shaking thinking he's not that dumb, didn't know what an avocado was or that you didn't eat the rind. Loved sweets and diabetic, egad. An accident waiting to happen. Someone, a higher being was looking out for him because he never went into a coma. Whew, like watching a train wreck. It was still a good book, it was just very different.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne

    I tried to love it I really did. I even switched to the audiobook to see if that wouldn't get me into the mood for finishing this one but I just couldn't. None of the characters suited me and there was nothing relatable for me. When I read a character driven story there has to be at least one character that's a good person and not so negative all the time about everything. I tried to love it I really did. I even switched to the audiobook to see if that wouldn't get me into the mood for finishing this one but I just couldn't. None of the characters suited me and there was nothing relatable for me. When I read a character driven story there has to be at least one character that's a good person and not so negative all the time about everything.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    As if being a closeted gay teenager wasn't hard enough, Tim Anderson is diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. In this laugh-out-loud memoir, Tim puts a humorous twist on his painful experiences growing up in the 1980s. If you are into humour, this candid memoir is not to be missed. As if being a closeted gay teenager wasn't hard enough, Tim Anderson is diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. In this laugh-out-loud memoir, Tim puts a humorous twist on his painful experiences growing up in the 1980s. If you are into humour, this candid memoir is not to be missed.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarahanne

    Coming of age story with diabetes. Some mildly amusing moments but nothing really engaging. The audio book passed the time while driving (listening at 1.5x speed) but the only part that was really pleasant & engaging was the last chapter & epilogue.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Luis Orellana

    Such Fun A book I really enjoyed, it was my companion for the last month on my commute to work. Always wanted for my travel to be longer since I was enjoying the story so much. I learned a few words along the way. But the highest point is how relatable it felt, how seen I felt.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Arlene Gutierrez

    Entertaining This book was hilarious! It wasn’t all funny because it was about life, but the author’s ability to make light of any and all situations, was amazing. I would recommend this book to anyone who loves a good comedy with a happy ending.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Andree Tite

    Good Very well written and a good insight into teenage life dealing with homosexuality back in the nineties as well as reminding me of all great music around at the time!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Charles

    More like 3.5. Started out fabulously, but ended up not being what I expected...which is more about me than the book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    George Broadway

    A Wonderful Book Tim does a great job of describing the trials and tribulations of being a gay diabetic. I truely enjoyed this book. Thanks Tim !

  30. 4 out of 5

    Melvin

    A very funny book about a serious issue. I found it refreshing to hear from another T1 diabetic like myself. Would highly recommend this book to all young adults living with diabetes.

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