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Flood Country: When a Drought Hits, the Water Wars Begin

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Jack Miller, former Sydney Morning Herald journalist, follows his instincts to rural Dawson to do a followup piece on a headline that read 'Angry farmer accuses bureaucrat of corruption'. Little did he know what he was about to unleash as he set about helping the feisty old cattle farmer to expose corruption in the water industry—blatant water theft at the height of a ten y Jack Miller, former Sydney Morning Herald journalist, follows his instincts to rural Dawson to do a followup piece on a headline that read 'Angry farmer accuses bureaucrat of corruption'. Little did he know what he was about to unleash as he set about helping the feisty old cattle farmer to expose corruption in the water industry—blatant water theft at the height of a ten year drought crippling the Australian farming landscape. As Jack and his friends slowly unravel the web of deceit and corruption, which extends through the bureaucracy and into the corridors of political power and big business, they are confronted by an increasingly desperate enemy willing to do anything to stay above the law. The story, while fiction, uses close to real life happenings as the context and this means it also touches on the tough, but little spoken of issues, of high rates of farmer suicide, the erosion of rural communities through misguided government policies and the buy-up of Australia's rural interests by multinationals. Accordingly, proceeds of this book are being donated to the not-for-profit organisations RiverSmart Australia and Beyond Blue.


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Jack Miller, former Sydney Morning Herald journalist, follows his instincts to rural Dawson to do a followup piece on a headline that read 'Angry farmer accuses bureaucrat of corruption'. Little did he know what he was about to unleash as he set about helping the feisty old cattle farmer to expose corruption in the water industry—blatant water theft at the height of a ten y Jack Miller, former Sydney Morning Herald journalist, follows his instincts to rural Dawson to do a followup piece on a headline that read 'Angry farmer accuses bureaucrat of corruption'. Little did he know what he was about to unleash as he set about helping the feisty old cattle farmer to expose corruption in the water industry—blatant water theft at the height of a ten year drought crippling the Australian farming landscape. As Jack and his friends slowly unravel the web of deceit and corruption, which extends through the bureaucracy and into the corridors of political power and big business, they are confronted by an increasingly desperate enemy willing to do anything to stay above the law. The story, while fiction, uses close to real life happenings as the context and this means it also touches on the tough, but little spoken of issues, of high rates of farmer suicide, the erosion of rural communities through misguided government policies and the buy-up of Australia's rural interests by multinationals. Accordingly, proceeds of this book are being donated to the not-for-profit organisations RiverSmart Australia and Beyond Blue.

17 review for Flood Country: When a Drought Hits, the Water Wars Begin

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tobia

    I really wanted to like this book. I was intrigued by the topic and the settings general. It started out so slow and more than once I thought about quittting. After about 40%(!) it finally started to pick up somewhat. Overall I’d say it was a bit forced, on occasion a bit too much. In the beginning the dialogues were so constructed and emotionless it bothered the heck out of me. 1* for the topic (which could have been a bit more explored) 1* for the setting/storyline 1* for the improvement from beg I really wanted to like this book. I was intrigued by the topic and the settings general. It started out so slow and more than once I thought about quittting. After about 40%(!) it finally started to pick up somewhat. Overall I’d say it was a bit forced, on occasion a bit too much. In the beginning the dialogues were so constructed and emotionless it bothered the heck out of me. 1* for the topic (which could have been a bit more explored) 1* for the setting/storyline 1* for the improvement from beginning to end I believe it could have been a much better book with some work (and a good editor?!). In the end I was just annoyed how much time I spent on it and glad I was done.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paul Cropper

  3. 4 out of 5

    Deb Loomis

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chad WetMORE

  5. 4 out of 5

    graeme styles

  6. 5 out of 5

    ms s j king

  7. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Shovlin

  8. 4 out of 5

    tom collins

  9. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sylvia McDonald

  11. 4 out of 5

    Samand

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Rios

  13. 4 out of 5

    John Mathers

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lezli

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy Karemi

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mimi

  17. 4 out of 5

    Davebaxter2006hotmail.Co.Uk

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