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From the blistering jungles of Vietnam to the far-flung battlefields of the African Congo, they faced the turmoil of a new era. It was a different kind of war. But the courage and skill of these young fighting men were an American tradition. Like their fathers before them, they rose up to the ultimate challenge of military valor, holding their own in a storm of clashing cu From the blistering jungles of Vietnam to the far-flung battlefields of the African Congo, they faced the turmoil of a new era. It was a different kind of war. But the courage and skill of these young fighting men were an American tradition. Like their fathers before them, they rose up to the ultimate challenge of military valor, holding their own in a storm of clashing cultures. They were America's new breed. The proudest and the best...


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From the blistering jungles of Vietnam to the far-flung battlefields of the African Congo, they faced the turmoil of a new era. It was a different kind of war. But the courage and skill of these young fighting men were an American tradition. Like their fathers before them, they rose up to the ultimate challenge of military valor, holding their own in a storm of clashing cu From the blistering jungles of Vietnam to the far-flung battlefields of the African Congo, they faced the turmoil of a new era. It was a different kind of war. But the courage and skill of these young fighting men were an American tradition. Like their fathers before them, they rose up to the ultimate challenge of military valor, holding their own in a storm of clashing cultures. They were America's new breed. The proudest and the best...

30 review for The New Breed

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    It is difficult to write reviews for the books in this series because I am reading them so quickly. I bought all of them at one time and have been going non-stop so that as soon as I finish one I just start the next leaving me no time to pause and write a review. However, I felt this book deserved a little bit of individual attention simply because, so far, it was the best of the bunch in not only this series but also of "The Corps" series which I read immediately before "The Brotherhood of War." It is difficult to write reviews for the books in this series because I am reading them so quickly. I bought all of them at one time and have been going non-stop so that as soon as I finish one I just start the next leaving me no time to pause and write a review. However, I felt this book deserved a little bit of individual attention simply because, so far, it was the best of the bunch in not only this series but also of "The Corps" series which I read immediately before "The Brotherhood of War." This book doesn't stand out because Griffin suddenly changed his formula either; it still features extraordinary soldiers and the women they love or lust after. This is the first book in the series that doesn't focus on Craig Lowell - instead it is really about the young private Portet drafted into the US Army from his expat home in the Congo where he fly's for his fathers fledgling airline. Portet, much like the rest of Griffin's characters, has an unusual ability to absorb languages - plus he is fairly well off financially though he isn't, as Lowell would say, "Comfortable." Portet, much like Lowell, however, isn't very pleased to find himself in the military and is just counting down the days until his obligation is fulfilled and he can return home. Home is the crux of his problem. Griffin has changed the playing field, and the normal flow of time in the series, by focusing on the chaos that took place in the Congo during the mid 1960's. "The Generals", the book that precedes "The New Breed" in the series actually takes place later in the 60's, after the events of "The New Breed." Furthermore, the other books in the series focus on the Asian Pacific theater so being thrust into the Congo rebellion is a little bit jarring; but in a good way. To tell the truth I was a little tired of Craig Lowell and his playboy lifestyle. I had tired of him a couple books prior; he never seemed to learn his lesson about screwing around. Craig's nephew, Geoff who is also featured in this book, is a more likable guy because he is both married and faithful to his wife Ursula. Furthermore, Private Portet, who was a bit of a ladies man before entering the Army, isn't simply a rich kid with an unusually successful love life. Instead he seems to have a little more depth than Lowell. I have also really enjoyed learning more about the circumstances of the strife in the Congo. It is one of those engagements I haven't read much about even though I'm somewhat familiar with Joseph Mobutu and Moise Tshombe. One of my favorite aspects of Historic Fiction is that it provides me with a launching pad to learn more about the actual history behind the story. I am anxious to learn more about the people and the events that took place around the Congo in the 1960s' thanks to this book. You can pick up any of Griffin's book and read them out of order because he does a pretty good job of providing the back story filler for each main character in each book. This is a little bit annoying when you read the books back to back - but it provides a casual reader with the perfect excuse to skip straight to "The New Breed" for an interesting and compelling story about the Cold War and our efforts to stop the spread of Communism through the world.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Pieck

    After finishing "The Generals" (which ends with an epilogue in the style of Where They Are Now), I was a bit surprised when Book 7 in Griffin's "Brotherhood of War" series opened in 1963 with Sandy Felter in his first meeting with newly-installed President Lyndon Johnson. I thought the story in the first six books was wide-ranging and deep, with plenty of characters to keep the plot spinning along nicely. But I also thought that it would be hard to continue it, especially by going back in time. H After finishing "The Generals" (which ends with an epilogue in the style of Where They Are Now), I was a bit surprised when Book 7 in Griffin's "Brotherhood of War" series opened in 1963 with Sandy Felter in his first meeting with newly-installed President Lyndon Johnson. I thought the story in the first six books was wide-ranging and deep, with plenty of characters to keep the plot spinning along nicely. But I also thought that it would be hard to continue it, especially by going back in time. However, I also thought that, after the focus on the antics and derring-do of Craig Lowell and Company, it might be interesting to get a clearer picture of Felter, a soldier who did most of his fighting in the halls of the White House, Pentagon, and in secret. Still, could Felter sustain a book--or three? The short answer is yes. Felter is no less a weapon than the Green Berets who starred in the prior volumes. And in this novel, we get to meet the up-and-coming generation of soldiers, many of them the sons of men we met in earlier books. Jeff Craig goes from being a reluctant recruit to a highly effective Green Beret. We are also introduced to Jack Portet, another unwilling draftee. The book's plot also focuses on developments in the recently independent Congo, where the population is divided between how to exercise this new independence--i.e., how much "assistance" to accept from former colonists. Any doubts I had about the vitality of the story flew out the window soon after PFC. Portet got himself tangled up with General Robert Bellman's daughter as well as with Colonel Felter's group of "colleagues". We're also treated to more in-depth explorations of the stories behind Karl-Heinz Wagner, a former East German officer who crashed through the Berlin Wall and joined the United States Army so he could "kill Communists" (he also gets tangled up with Felter), his sister Ursula (married to Jeff Craig), and plenty of others. Yet again, the vitality, passion, and compassion for those involved in soldiering--both on the battlefield and at home--is clear on every page. I'm glad there are still two books left in this series and will definitely miss the characters who peopled these tales when I turn the last page in the last volume.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ira Livingston

    My favorite so far of the entire series. After the last volume, "The Generals" I really thought that they were finished, if you read it, you'll see why at the end of the book. But this book brings back most of our beloved characters, and moves to the front many of the secondary characters of previous volumes. It also brings the Congo Independence to the fore front - a piece of American history greatly overshadowed by the rising conflict in Vietnam. The level of suspense in this volume surpasses th My favorite so far of the entire series. After the last volume, "The Generals" I really thought that they were finished, if you read it, you'll see why at the end of the book. But this book brings back most of our beloved characters, and moves to the front many of the secondary characters of previous volumes. It also brings the Congo Independence to the fore front - a piece of American history greatly overshadowed by the rising conflict in Vietnam. The level of suspense in this volume surpasses the others, showing Griffin's writing style is improving as you get deeper into the series. I'd recommend this volume greatly, but you still need the previous volumes for all of the comradely and back story of the main characters.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Keith Blodgett

    This one took a little longer. There was a lot of chatter and running around before we get to the action in Stanleyville and elsewhere in the Congo. It's bloody and horrific but also full of the courage of the professional soldier who stand up when called. I was a little confused and maybe some disappointed when the author either forgot his own source material or just decided to up and change things. In this novel we're told our long time character Craig Lowell won his promotion on the battlefie This one took a little longer. There was a lot of chatter and running around before we get to the action in Stanleyville and elsewhere in the Congo. It's bloody and horrific but also full of the courage of the professional soldier who stand up when called. I was a little confused and maybe some disappointed when the author either forgot his own source material or just decided to up and change things. In this novel we're told our long time character Craig Lowell won his promotion on the battlefield in Greece when anyone who's read this series knows that's not true. Lowell was promoted because a general wanted him for his polo team and the French whom he was competing against don't mix with enlisted men. Still, the story wax a good one, probably the bloodiest of the series so far but also a bit too talky inbetween the action sequences.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Clem

    This book was a pleasant surprise on many levels. The seventh installment of the author’s “Brotherhood of War” series is a book that, I’m somewhat convinced, might not have ever had the intention of being written. Volume Six, “The Generals” was probably supposed to have been the last. That one was somewhat haphazard, took place during two different time periods (both stories seemed unrelated) and even had a “Where Are They Now” postscript at the end of the book. It was a definitely a letdown. I’m This book was a pleasant surprise on many levels. The seventh installment of the author’s “Brotherhood of War” series is a book that, I’m somewhat convinced, might not have ever had the intention of being written. Volume Six, “The Generals” was probably supposed to have been the last. That one was somewhat haphazard, took place during two different time periods (both stories seemed unrelated) and even had a “Where Are They Now” postscript at the end of the book. It was a definitely a letdown. I’m guessing that the author realized that he still had more story to tell around his characters and their escapades, and decided to resurrect the series. For this book, we go back several years to 1964. The focus for this installment is the Communist uprising in the Congo. Most people nowadays are not really familiar with that event. We tend to remember this time, when speaking of military events, as the time when America was starting their escalation into Vietnam, so that event tends to be our focus when we think back. I immensely enjoyed this book for two reasons. First, unlike the other books in this series, this book tends to focus more on the actual fighting and the incidents going on in the thick of the conflict. In the other installments, Griffin only talks about the major conflicts in a half-hearted way, choosing instead to focus on the main characters that are mostly far away from the battle. The earlier books take place during World War II, Korea, and Vietnam, yet very little action takes place on the battlefield. Instead, Griffin focuses a lot on his principal characters, their love lives, their sex lives, their tendencies to imbibe a lot at cocktail parties, and so on. He still managed to tell a good story, it just got a bit old after a while. It’s somewhat refreshing to finally read a book about the military where the actual events that made history have a much more predominant role in the storytelling. The second reason I enjoyed this book so much is somewhat related to the first reason. When we read about love lives, sex lives, and cocktail parties, Craig Lowell was always the lead character in the previous books and, after a while, the shtick got old. Lowell is one of those characters that fits in perfectly for an old 1940s style war movie. Incredibly good looking, incredibly rich, insatiable with every woman he meets, and incredibly rebellious against the military and its rules. Lowell always weasels out the consequences of his actions because, well, just like one of those handsome actors in those old movies, is an outstanding soldier. In this book, he’s featured rarely. Instead, his friend Sandy Felter gets the spotlight through most of the book. It’s Felter who convinces new President Johnson that the Congo is just as equally as hot as Vietnam, and action must be taken there as well. So we meet a few new characters, revisit a lot of older characters that were introduced to us somewhere along the older books, and are treated to a very good story. I can’t say it’s the best of the lot. After reading so many of these, the timeline blurs for me when trying to remember what happened in every one of the books (especially when the author spends probably too much time revisiting events that happened in the earlier books. I guess he wants to make sure his reader remembers and/or doesn’t get lost). It's par for the course. Perhaps I enjoyed it so much is because the author smartly realized that there were too many loose ends after the last book, and that particular one wasn’t as satisfying. A wonderful addition to a very good series.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Tee

    The New Breed is the sixth installment of the hardcover series “Brotherhood of War” by W.E.B. Griffin and is said to be the best one of all the other 8 books. The book is about 4 American colonels and their daily lives during the Congo crisis and the Vietnam war. Colonel Sanford, Colonel Rudolph George, Colonel Craig, and Colonel Philip, who were in all of the previous books, but in this one W.E.B. Griffin writes and introduces a new character to the series named Jack Portet. The book takes a ste The New Breed is the sixth installment of the hardcover series “Brotherhood of War” by W.E.B. Griffin and is said to be the best one of all the other 8 books. The book is about 4 American colonels and their daily lives during the Congo crisis and the Vietnam war. Colonel Sanford, Colonel Rudolph George, Colonel Craig, and Colonel Philip, who were in all of the previous books, but in this one W.E.B. Griffin writes and introduces a new character to the series named Jack Portet. The book takes a step into the past after the 6th installment of the series before the lives of the 4 Colonels have come to closure where some of them got a happy ending while the others did not. And it later continues on with Jack Portet story and his relationship with the other 4 Colonels. The book gives you a different perspective of war. Rather than the perspective of the government, it shows you the perspective of the people who fight the wars themselves, whether it's directly or indirectly. Normally it would have helped if I were to read the previous books in order to get a better understanding of the story, characters and the style of writing W.E.B. Griffin uses. But with this book it is unnecessary to read all the other books as it still gives you good background information on all the other characters and their individual personalities. For example without knowing the previous books I know now that Colonel Sanford is the assistant to the president and has the hunger to back into the field of battle as he feels dissatisfied fighting the war indirectly. Throughout all of this I feel like this series is one of the more interesting ones that I have read and I might even take the time to read all the other volumes.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Richard Guerrero

    Loved it again. Really enjoyed how the emphasis was more on Colonel Sandy Felter. Like to read more books through his character. I did notice though how he grew a few inches and adding some weight on this book in comparison to a couple of books back. They always call him the mouse, a midget, a very small person. On a couple of books back he was 5‘4“ and 130 pounds. On this book he had a growth spurt and is now 5‘7“ and 148 pounds. That is small but there is a good difference between the two. I k Loved it again. Really enjoyed how the emphasis was more on Colonel Sandy Felter. Like to read more books through his character. I did notice though how he grew a few inches and adding some weight on this book in comparison to a couple of books back. They always call him the mouse, a midget, a very small person. On a couple of books back he was 5‘4“ and 130 pounds. On this book he had a growth spurt and is now 5‘7“ and 148 pounds. That is small but there is a good difference between the two. I know that doesn’t mean anything but still had to note it. One of my only concerns is on how his young prestige characters have attitudes and are able to pop off a little more. How Jack brought in his girlfriend Marge, general Bob’s daughter, and how the mother and the sun was able to find out about the top secret Mission with no repercussion. I know they have some family involved but they do not hesitate of talking back to authority. Talking more about Jack and Jeffrey Craig. Hope the next books done start getting a little too carried away with those characters. It seems like if you have prestige or money the book is giving them more of a leeway. With that being said, looking forward to the next book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jc

    His books are always fun to read. The recipe is the same: a couple of young soldiers (one of which is very rich and connected, the other one poor and self-made) involved in some military action with a bit of clean romance sprinkled on top. What I discover here is that the historical background is not fictional.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Richie hall

    Very good, knows how the military mind works worts and all. Anyone who has been in the military it will take them back to their younger days with a smile on the face and a lump in their throats

  10. 4 out of 5

    Scott Bienz

    Excellent overall series with some flaws This is my 5th re-read. Web Griffin was a master at weaving the military story through multiple generations, though his writing suffers from some obvious prejudices he carried (some veiled anti-semitism and racism).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    Typical WEB Griffin novel. Same format and recipe. New characters show up to replace those who died or retired in previous books. Some of the previous characters are still alive and serving their country in this. Primarily about a Spec Ops mission to the Congo

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Morrison

    One of my favorite series, I started reading it when we were stationed in Germany in 1987. I reread the series probably once a year just for fun.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stewart Wolfe

    W.E.B. Griffin's Brotherhood of War series is wonderful. He understands that individual military members have different ways of coping with the constant stress they experience. W.E.B. Griffin's Brotherhood of War series is wonderful. He understands that individual military members have different ways of coping with the constant stress they experience.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gary H. BRyant

    As usual this is a great book.! Can hardly put it down. I would recommend this book to all my friends. I 'm reading this series for the second time. I as good as the first time. As usual this is a great book.! Can hardly put it down. I would recommend this book to all my friends. I 'm reading this series for the second time. I as good as the first time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth Stufflebeam

    I hat that I am all must done with them.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Boswell

    Possibly the greatest war series of all time. My father read this and passed it down to me. Great reading.

  17. 5 out of 5

    William Walter

    Above average for W.E.B. Griffin, better characters with some development

  18. 5 out of 5

    john garten

    Great book It's as good as the rest of his books and I love how it goes to the next generation I wish there were more Great book It's as good as the rest of his books and I love how it goes to the next generation I wish there were more

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

    And they keep marching on! Great series with a great cast!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    Griffin tells the US Army story. Always a good read

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lucas

    Join the great illuminati Family and flourish forever We offer wealth, light 🔺 Power and fame 🔺 Inbox/WhatsApp +2347084603892 Email:[email protected] For imediate help

  22. 4 out of 5

    Angus Whittaker

    The previous book in this series - The Generals, book 6 - seemed to finish up the whole series. We were told how the lives of Lowell, Felter, Bellmon, and all the other characters ended, and how some of them lived happily ever after and some did not. Anyway, it surprised me, then, to find that, instead of creating some new characters and continuing from where he left off - or, even more likely, just concluding the entire series - WEB Griffin went back a few years to 1964 and wrote another book. The previous book in this series - The Generals, book 6 - seemed to finish up the whole series. We were told how the lives of Lowell, Felter, Bellmon, and all the other characters ended, and how some of them lived happily ever after and some did not. Anyway, it surprised me, then, to find that, instead of creating some new characters and continuing from where he left off - or, even more likely, just concluding the entire series - WEB Griffin went back a few years to 1964 and wrote another book. It takes place in the Congo, in a conflict that I hadn't even really known about before reading this book, unlike his other book set in 1964, which was set in Vietnam. Contrary to what I said before, WEB Griffin does actually introduce a new character, who I guess could be the "main character" of the novel, but all the old ones feature in it, too. This new character is Jack Portet, and he possesses even less character than some of Griffin's other cardboard cutouts... I mean characters. In fact, I would say that Portet has less character development, idiosyncrasies, and general personality than my cat. This is not to say that this was not a good book - as you can see, I still gave it 5 stars. These stars are awarded for the performance of the other characters, who put on a good show, the plot, suspense (if you can call it that) and general enjoyability. One thing that always strikes me odd about Griffin's books, however, is the lack of action (apart from bedroom action, of which they contain their fair share). You'd think that, cigar-chomping, beard-wearing, gun-toting veteran that he is, Griffin would includes some bloody and gritty battle scenes. After all, his subject matter includes World War II, Greece, Korea, Vietnam, Cuba, and now the Congo - all of which were bloody and intense crises. He does not. The most action he ever includes consists of a few paragraphs, maybe even up to a page or two, of light gunfire. This does not necessarily detract from his books, it's just kind of strange.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Molly Franks

    W.E.B. Griffin is my number one author EVER! His real name is William E. Butterworth and I don't know where the Griffin came from. His books are military in nature and as I am ex-Army I can readily identiy. He has several series going. One series is about N.Y. policemen. His dialogue is so brilliant that I can't put the books down. Such interesting characters and great plots. My favorites are the military ones. He starts off writing about WWI. Sounds boring to some but again, his character developme W.E.B. Griffin is my number one author EVER! His real name is William E. Butterworth and I don't know where the Griffin came from. His books are military in nature and as I am ex-Army I can readily identiy. He has several series going. One series is about N.Y. policemen. His dialogue is so brilliant that I can't put the books down. Such interesting characters and great plots. My favorites are the military ones. He starts off writing about WWI. Sounds boring to some but again, his character development is awesome. You don't have to have a military background to read these. His explanations are so well written that anyone can understand what he's talking about. The series begins when this rich polo playing kid was drafted into WWI as a private. He was stationed overseas (I think - because it's been a long time since I read these) and a General Officer wanted to play polo but they were one man short. They put out a call for polo players and this guy answered. BUT the General wouldn't play with an enlisted man so he was promoted to 2LT to play polo. That was not the plot of the story but I thougt it was really cute. The characters grow and move into the next novel progressively. They are placed into actual military battles and you get to see the development of offensive / defensive military tactics that are made so interesting. He uses obscure military events and places his characters right smack dab in the middle of them. I can't stree enough to give this guy a chance. BUT it would be better to start at the beginning of his series since his characters are used over and over again. You may miss out on the character development but he does go into explanations of each character if you happen to read them out of order. Please give him a chance and ENJOY!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    PLAYING WITH FIRE by Katie MacAlister is 331 pages in length in paperback form. This is #1 in A Novel Of The Silver Dragons. Brief Description: FIRE AND WATER DON'T MIX -- OR DO THEY? Gabriel Tauhou, the leader of the silver dragons, can't take his eyes off May Northcott -- not even when May, who has the unique talent of being able to hide in the shadows, has slipped from everyone else's sight. May, however, has little time for Gabriel -- not when she's hiding from the Otherworld law, hunting down a PLAYING WITH FIRE by Katie MacAlister is 331 pages in length in paperback form. This is #1 in A Novel Of The Silver Dragons. Brief Description: FIRE AND WATER DON'T MIX -- OR DO THEY? Gabriel Tauhou, the leader of the silver dragons, can't take his eyes off May Northcott -- not even when May, who has the unique talent of being able to hide in the shadows, has slipped from everyone else's sight. May, however, has little time for Gabriel -- not when she's hiding from the Otherworld law, hunting down a blackmailer, and trying to avoid a demon lord's demands. But her ability to withstand Gabriel's fire marks her as his mate, and he has no intention of letting her disappear into the darkness she seems to prefer. Then May is ordered to steal one of Gabriel's treasures -- an immensely important relic of all dragonkin -- and he must decide which to protect: his love or his dragons. This is a very interesting read. I am not sure I understand all the fantasy parts about dragons and doppelgangers, but I am not sure you really need to. May is a very interesting person who is twin to Cyrene. Cyrene and May seem to end up in more trouble than even a dragon can get them out of. This is probably "R" rated as some of the sex scenes are intense. This has a lot of humor, sex, a bit of a mystery and interesting individuals in the book. I am giving this 4 out of 5 stars. I do plan to read the next in the series to see what happens to May and Gabriel. I was left hanging in this first book. BUY NOW: Conniesbookshelf $2.99

  25. 4 out of 5

    Richard Palmer

    After he ended the series with Book 6, Griffin must have felt the need to go back and get more out of the characters. Even though we know the future history, after Vietnam, this book goes back and creates a story centered on a civil war in Africa. Lowell and Felter are there, as is Bellmon. There are some new young officers, and Lowell's nephew is one of the key figures in the story. This was very similar to The Generals, in which there is a long buildup to a battle at the end. I found it a litt After he ended the series with Book 6, Griffin must have felt the need to go back and get more out of the characters. Even though we know the future history, after Vietnam, this book goes back and creates a story centered on a civil war in Africa. Lowell and Felter are there, as is Bellmon. There are some new young officers, and Lowell's nephew is one of the key figures in the story. This was very similar to The Generals, in which there is a long buildup to a battle at the end. I found it a little slow going, but in the end, Griffin comes through and the characters show the same bravado and swagger that we are used to. There are some interesting portraits of LBJ as president, since he has elected to keep Felter around as his counselor. If you liked the rest of the series, you will find the same soap opera character buildup and a little of the same action here.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Will

    The Stanleyville Rescue and the Gulf of Tonkin Incident. The powers that be move to the air cav and Vietnam gets its incendiary start in the Gulf of Tonkin. Great effort is expended to staunch the Commie vortex into Africa, beginning with the former Belgian Congo, where Ursula and baby, and Hanni and Mary Magdalene get caught in the middle of a Simba insurrection. Defying all odds, Jack Portet is able to secret himself off with Margorie Bellmon for an intense weekend of sexual heat before he is The Stanleyville Rescue and the Gulf of Tonkin Incident. The powers that be move to the air cav and Vietnam gets its incendiary start in the Gulf of Tonkin. Great effort is expended to staunch the Commie vortex into Africa, beginning with the former Belgian Congo, where Ursula and baby, and Hanni and Mary Magdalene get caught in the middle of a Simba insurrection. Defying all odds, Jack Portet is able to secret himself off with Margorie Bellmon for an intense weekend of sexual heat before he is swept away as a subject matter expert on the Congo, culminating in his jumping into Stanleyville wih the Belgians and rescuing Ursula and company and reuniting with Father Lundsford and escaping the madness.

  27. 4 out of 5

    William Ridgley

    This applies to ALL W.E.B. Griffin's (at al.) books in this series. Griffin write a strong tale, with the most important element in a good story: characters you like and care about. Of course, that doesn't minimize the importance of a plausible story, particularly when dealing with fiction in historical events. Griffin is a past master at this, and his books never disappoint! I particularly enjoy snippets of apparently un-well known historical surmises/guesses/facts that are included to give his This applies to ALL W.E.B. Griffin's (at al.) books in this series. Griffin write a strong tale, with the most important element in a good story: characters you like and care about. Of course, that doesn't minimize the importance of a plausible story, particularly when dealing with fiction in historical events. Griffin is a past master at this, and his books never disappoint! I particularly enjoy snippets of apparently un-well known historical surmises/guesses/facts that are included to give his books a very nice flavor! I originally read the series in paperback in the late eighties/early 90s and still had the paperbacks (which were packed away) and repurchased them in Kindle to re-read and share with my wife, who also enjoyed them!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    “The New Breeds” – the seventh book in the “Brotherhood of War” It is the least interesting book in the series. After “The Generals” , Griffin went back few years and wrote an “addendum” to what happened during the Congo conflict. He created new and developed previous characters, but it was hard to get excited about Jack Porte and others after the author finished the story of Lowell, Felter and Bellmon. This book added another chapter of Fleter’s life but it did not create any excitement ( for m “The New Breeds” – the seventh book in the “Brotherhood of War” It is the least interesting book in the series. After “The Generals” , Griffin went back few years and wrote an “addendum” to what happened during the Congo conflict. He created new and developed previous characters, but it was hard to get excited about Jack Porte and others after the author finished the story of Lowell, Felter and Bellmon. This book added another chapter of Fleter’s life but it did not create any excitement ( for me) It was a lot of writing about nothing but I have to say that the ending was quite electrifying. https://adamvb67.wordpress.com

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bob Conner

    I first fell in love with Griffin's series beginning with the Corps Series. Then along came Brotherhood of War. Like The Corps, his characters are engaging and richly colorful. But, the Brotherhood of War, while still very dynamic, seems to focus a little less on the world of war and fighting and more on the culture of the US Army, especially the officer's corps. Reading this series, I was intrigued by the almost country-club like atmosphere Griffin sees in play among the US Army officers and th I first fell in love with Griffin's series beginning with the Corps Series. Then along came Brotherhood of War. Like The Corps, his characters are engaging and richly colorful. But, the Brotherhood of War, while still very dynamic, seems to focus a little less on the world of war and fighting and more on the culture of the US Army, especially the officer's corps. Reading this series, I was intrigued by the almost country-club like atmosphere Griffin sees in play among the US Army officers and the history behind the Army's culture.

  30. 4 out of 5

    George

    Book 8 of 9 in the "Brotherhood..." series. Good book that intertwines with "The Aviators" and set circa 1964. Again, the main characters developed well and are well traveled. There are minor errors of context, but the research is exquisite. Further, it's written from an Army perspective and isn't very joint in nature. Perhaps Special Ops did not get joint until after 1979? On to the last book of the series: "Special Ops." Book 8 of 9 in the "Brotherhood..." series. Good book that intertwines with "The Aviators" and set circa 1964. Again, the main characters developed well and are well traveled. There are minor errors of context, but the research is exquisite. Further, it's written from an Army perspective and isn't very joint in nature. Perhaps Special Ops did not get joint until after 1979? On to the last book of the series: "Special Ops."

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