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Sue Coe: The Ghosts of Our Meat

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The Ghosts of Our Meat examines a series of paintings, prints and drawings by artist/activist Sue Coe that criticize the practice of meat consumption and the capitalist slaughterhouse industry, while advocating animal rights and a sustainable, non-meat diet. Coe's work centers on such issues as animal rights, empathy, cruelty, corporate greed and consumer guilt. Discussing The Ghosts of Our Meat examines a series of paintings, prints and drawings by artist/activist Sue Coe that criticize the practice of meat consumption and the capitalist slaughterhouse industry, while advocating animal rights and a sustainable, non-meat diet. Coe's work centers on such issues as animal rights, empathy, cruelty, corporate greed and consumer guilt. Discussing her works in an accompanying essay, Stephen Eisenman demonstrates connections between Coe's work and that of Romantics and Expressionists, inviting comparisons with paintings by artists such as Hogarth, Goya, Grosz, Dix, Shahn, Picasso and Golub. However, while these artists focused largely on man's inhumanity towards fellow man, Sue Coe broadens the perspective to include atrocities committed by man against fellow animals. Indeed, many of Coe's works reference the style and imagery of Weimar-era art, drawing uncomfortable and controversial comparisons between the slaughterhouses of the meat industry and those of the Holocaust.


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The Ghosts of Our Meat examines a series of paintings, prints and drawings by artist/activist Sue Coe that criticize the practice of meat consumption and the capitalist slaughterhouse industry, while advocating animal rights and a sustainable, non-meat diet. Coe's work centers on such issues as animal rights, empathy, cruelty, corporate greed and consumer guilt. Discussing The Ghosts of Our Meat examines a series of paintings, prints and drawings by artist/activist Sue Coe that criticize the practice of meat consumption and the capitalist slaughterhouse industry, while advocating animal rights and a sustainable, non-meat diet. Coe's work centers on such issues as animal rights, empathy, cruelty, corporate greed and consumer guilt. Discussing her works in an accompanying essay, Stephen Eisenman demonstrates connections between Coe's work and that of Romantics and Expressionists, inviting comparisons with paintings by artists such as Hogarth, Goya, Grosz, Dix, Shahn, Picasso and Golub. However, while these artists focused largely on man's inhumanity towards fellow man, Sue Coe broadens the perspective to include atrocities committed by man against fellow animals. Indeed, many of Coe's works reference the style and imagery of Weimar-era art, drawing uncomfortable and controversial comparisons between the slaughterhouses of the meat industry and those of the Holocaust.

25 review for Sue Coe: The Ghosts of Our Meat

  1. 5 out of 5

    Diogenes

    I only recently stumbled upon Sue Coe, and I feel ashamed to not have heard about her sooner. This catalogue for a 2013 exhibit at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania is a powerful protest against meat-eating and industrial slaughter, which is the focus Coe has dedicated her life’s work to. In many ways I feel she is the Barbara Krueger of animal rights, but that is just one person’s impression. Coe does so with tenacity and a huge heart for the animal kingdom. We could all certainly seek to eat m I only recently stumbled upon Sue Coe, and I feel ashamed to not have heard about her sooner. This catalogue for a 2013 exhibit at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania is a powerful protest against meat-eating and industrial slaughter, which is the focus Coe has dedicated her life’s work to. In many ways I feel she is the Barbara Krueger of animal rights, but that is just one person’s impression. Coe does so with tenacity and a huge heart for the animal kingdom. We could all certainly seek to eat more veggies, and find our protein needs through plants, with obesity rates swelling as they are (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/obes...), and with environmental havoc already underway (Paul Hawken & crew’s master battle-plan Drawdown [http://www.drawdown.org/ ] has a “plant-rich diet” at #4 on their triaged list of crucial priorities humanity needs too undertake in order to forestall the dire effects of global warming). Choosing the higher moral ground doesn’t hurt in that effort too. A tri-fold win. If you’d like to be appalled into humility, devour Coe’s work with empathy and the willingness to consider better choices with all that you consume. This is art with profound meaning.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Zoe

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bwickre

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lacy B

  5. 5 out of 5

    Viola

  6. 4 out of 5

    amy elizabeth marceaux

  7. 4 out of 5

    Seb

  8. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leeanne Phipps

  10. 5 out of 5

    Erika Bradley

  11. 4 out of 5

    Larakaa

  12. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  13. 4 out of 5

    Christa May

  14. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne Goodwin

  15. 4 out of 5

    Maddog

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jenna Holakovsky

  17. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Moulson

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ana

  19. 5 out of 5

    Isabel

  20. 4 out of 5

    Money Shaw

  21. 5 out of 5

    fleur

  22. 5 out of 5

    Paromita

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hellen Songa

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nick

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jinx:The:Poet {the Literary Masochist, Ink Ninja & Word Roamer}

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