counter create hit The Children of Pride: A True Story of Georgia and the Civil War - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Children of Pride: A True Story of Georgia and the Civil War

Availability: Ready to download

This intimate record of a Georgia plantation family brings to life a proud but flawed society from its halcyon antebellum days through the shattering climaxes of defeat and occupation. Nowhere has the impact of the Civil War upon the South been portrayed with more immediacy than in these 1200 letters by the family and friends of the Reverend Dr. Charles Colcock Jones of Li This intimate record of a Georgia plantation family brings to life a proud but flawed society from its halcyon antebellum days through the shattering climaxes of defeat and occupation. Nowhere has the impact of the Civil War upon the South been portrayed with more immediacy than in these 1200 letters by the family and friends of the Reverend Dr. Charles Colcock Jones of Liberty County, Georgia. Arranged by Robert Manson Myers into a chronological narrative of the crucial years between 1854 and 1868, they read like an epistolary novel. The routines of plantation life, as affectionately described in the letters, are punctuated by episodes of drama: triumphs—surviving a yellow fever epidemic and selling an old slave for more than he is worth; vexations—a cousin’s degrading marriage and a Negro mother’s murder of her newborn child; and genuine tragedies—an appalling train wreck and the infamy of Andersonville. These letters underscore a fascinating and troubling paradox in American history: they reveal men and women who were intelligent, warmhearted, perceptive, and God-fearing, yet dedicated to the principle of slavery. The writers were proud of the national Union, but when its interests conflicted with their cherished mode of existence, they unhesitatingly chose the latter and defended it bravely. Confronted with the anguish and nostalgia of the postwar letters, few readerss will be immune to the poignancy of their defeat. The collapse of a civilization is a momentous thing. In The Children of Pride it pursues its inexorable course day by day, with the actors in the drama unaware of their destiny. Only the reader perceives the tragic ironies.


Compare

This intimate record of a Georgia plantation family brings to life a proud but flawed society from its halcyon antebellum days through the shattering climaxes of defeat and occupation. Nowhere has the impact of the Civil War upon the South been portrayed with more immediacy than in these 1200 letters by the family and friends of the Reverend Dr. Charles Colcock Jones of Li This intimate record of a Georgia plantation family brings to life a proud but flawed society from its halcyon antebellum days through the shattering climaxes of defeat and occupation. Nowhere has the impact of the Civil War upon the South been portrayed with more immediacy than in these 1200 letters by the family and friends of the Reverend Dr. Charles Colcock Jones of Liberty County, Georgia. Arranged by Robert Manson Myers into a chronological narrative of the crucial years between 1854 and 1868, they read like an epistolary novel. The routines of plantation life, as affectionately described in the letters, are punctuated by episodes of drama: triumphs—surviving a yellow fever epidemic and selling an old slave for more than he is worth; vexations—a cousin’s degrading marriage and a Negro mother’s murder of her newborn child; and genuine tragedies—an appalling train wreck and the infamy of Andersonville. These letters underscore a fascinating and troubling paradox in American history: they reveal men and women who were intelligent, warmhearted, perceptive, and God-fearing, yet dedicated to the principle of slavery. The writers were proud of the national Union, but when its interests conflicted with their cherished mode of existence, they unhesitatingly chose the latter and defended it bravely. Confronted with the anguish and nostalgia of the postwar letters, few readerss will be immune to the poignancy of their defeat. The collapse of a civilization is a momentous thing. In The Children of Pride it pursues its inexorable course day by day, with the actors in the drama unaware of their destiny. Only the reader perceives the tragic ironies.

30 review for The Children of Pride: A True Story of Georgia and the Civil War

  1. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    I started this book back late last summer and been with it so long I don't even have any good initial reaction insights left. Background: It's the story of a well-respected, wealthy, religious, compassionate, erudite, white supremacist, plantation family through the course of the civil war. The entire book consists of the letters they wrote to each other. Two cents: This is one of those books you internalize and never forget. It is one of the most insightful books on civil war times and one of t I started this book back late last summer and been with it so long I don't even have any good initial reaction insights left. Background: It's the story of a well-respected, wealthy, religious, compassionate, erudite, white supremacist, plantation family through the course of the civil war. The entire book consists of the letters they wrote to each other. Two cents: This is one of those books you internalize and never forget. It is one of the most insightful books on civil war times and one of the most unique books in the history of the human race. That's not hyperbole. I honestly doubt there is another collection of letters this extensive, written and preserved during one of the epic periods of human history, anywhere else in the world. The book starts in the heyday of the antebellum south. The family has several plantations, they are prosperous, the father is a respected elder in the Presbyterian church, and the sons are away in the north at Harvard law school and Penn Medical school. By the end of the book their plantations are razed, the family fortune is on its last legs and all the family is dispersed, consistent with the post war diaspora. You pass first hand through their marriages, their tragedies, the experience of their first born children, their careers, the death of loved ones, their military service, their racism and pride. Fiction could never do as much as this book-one person's imagination is only so expansive. History books can never do as much, writing from hindsight. Parts of their world are like our own, others radically different. Recently I find myself comparing it against life in internet times which only underscores how much the internet makes life feel like an abstraction, passing by as a movie. Final thought: Even the mini-biographies at the end of the book touched me deeply. The book is one of the best lessons in life I've ever read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lynne

    I read the unabridged version, which my local used book store was able to find for me. I am so glad to have discovered this series. Can't believe I didn't know about it all these years, since it won so many awards when it was first published. This true story of the Jones family in pre-Civil War years, war time, and the postwar era is totally absorbing. Now that I have family members living in the Savannah area, it has more meaning than if I had read it earlier. Each person in the Jones family ha I read the unabridged version, which my local used book store was able to find for me. I am so glad to have discovered this series. Can't believe I didn't know about it all these years, since it won so many awards when it was first published. This true story of the Jones family in pre-Civil War years, war time, and the postwar era is totally absorbing. Now that I have family members living in the Savannah area, it has more meaning than if I had read it earlier. Each person in the Jones family has his or her own voice, even through the letter format, and it is surprising how contemporary they often sound. Their good intentions are quite apparent, so it is even more shocking how callous they can sound about their slaves. Though they are concerned about souls, in the end it is all about business. I must also give great credit to the editor, Dr. Myers, for his monumental work in shaping this collection.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Laura Edwards

    If you are a Civil War buff this book is a worthwhile read. However, if you merely want an overview of the time period and setting, Sarah Morgan's Civil War Diaries would be a much better choice as it is written in a more engaging manner. When first reviewing the list of people central to the volume, I was encouraged by the large number and hoped to get many viewpoints of the times. To my disappointment, well over half the book involves letter exchanges between basically three people. This leads If you are a Civil War buff this book is a worthwhile read. However, if you merely want an overview of the time period and setting, Sarah Morgan's Civil War Diaries would be a much better choice as it is written in a more engaging manner. When first reviewing the list of people central to the volume, I was encouraged by the large number and hoped to get many viewpoints of the times. To my disappointment, well over half the book involves letter exchanges between basically three people. This leads to a great deal of repetition and a sort of tunnel vision of unfolding events. One of the most interesting parts occurred during Sherman's March across Georgia when excerpts from journals are interspersed with the letters. I think the book would have been better served to include journal excerpts throughout. To me, these were much more interesting and delved deeper into a person's thoughts and feelings. I was continually left incredulous by the thinking of Reverend Jones and his wife. Now, I'm not naïve as to how people, particularly Southerners, viewed black people during this time period. However, the hypocrisy displayed by a preacher was stunning. I kept wanting to ask him one question. "Do you think when getting to heaven, black people will be cooped up in a different section of paradise?" And both he, his wife and children exhort a need to fight for liberty as all the while they deny liberty to others. Another part of the letters which grew tedious were the constant listing of sicknesses and ailments. At times, I felt as if I'd been cornered by the elderly relative whose greatest thrill in life is to relay all their aches and pains. The prevalence of certain illnesses (such as cholera, yellow fever, measles, etc.), however, left me quite thankful I live in a time of vaccines and where scientists have eradicated many virulent illnesses. My favorite parts of the letters were the descriptions of the young children and their exploits. The pride of the grandparents shines through whenever they are mentioned and the reader can sense the love for the grandchildren and the eagerness the grandparents have while awaiting a visit. All of which made the death of little Julia very sad, even though I'd already perused the family tree and knew it was inevitable. The predominance of the children in the letters also helps the reader remember the truly innocent victims in any war, on either side. Children. While I admire the courage and reliance on faith of Mrs. Mary Jones (the Reverend's wife), at times her hypocrisy is breathtaking. My skin actually crawled when she stated that Caucasians are intellectually superior to blacks, though she certainly was not thinking differently than most for the time period. She is also greatly shocked that most of the black people would choose freedom over continuing enslavement. If nothing else, that should have proven her wrong on the question of intellect. One point which was returned to over and over left me perplexed and if anyone knows the answer, please enlighten me. The Reverend Jones at times, and later on his wife in much more emphatic fashion, continually plead with their eldest son, Charles Jr., to "accept God as his Savior". From all the letters I read that were written by Charles, he believed in God and Jesus and seemed quite religious. What am I missing? Is it something specific to the Presbyterian religion? Does he have to make a public statement of faith before he can be "saved"? Nothing I read by Charles Jr. left the impression that he was a godless man on the path to hell. If anyone can help with the specifics here, I'd appreciate it. Overall, a good look at the mindset of people in the South at the time and the way their lives are upended by war. Because of the repetition, however, I would recommend this only to people with an extreme interest in Civil War history.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I checked this book out of my local public library because it was the biggest book I had ever seen on the shelves there. I wasn't at all prepared for how fascinated and even swept-away I would be by this book. It was like the true story version of Gone With the Wind. I checked this book out of my local public library because it was the biggest book I had ever seen on the shelves there. I wasn't at all prepared for how fascinated and even swept-away I would be by this book. It was like the true story version of Gone With the Wind.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    I'd heard this dramatized on radio when it was first released in 1973 and wanted to get "the whole story." I would recommend the complete addition, which has an index, maps, and brief biographies of people mentioned in the letters. The abridged edition confines itself to the Civil War and Reconstruction periods and left me, at least, wondering why everyone was so concerned about Charlie's faith, why was Kitty Stiles so close to the family, and wondering what became of the minor players. I'd heard this dramatized on radio when it was first released in 1973 and wanted to get "the whole story." I would recommend the complete addition, which has an index, maps, and brief biographies of people mentioned in the letters. The abridged edition confines itself to the Civil War and Reconstruction periods and left me, at least, wondering why everyone was so concerned about Charlie's faith, why was Kitty Stiles so close to the family, and wondering what became of the minor players.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Absolutely superb history, a true slice of life. Shows an unbiased view of an extended family in the South before, during, and after the Civil War.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sherwood Smith

    This is the abridged version (at almost 700 pages) of the letters of a Georgia plantation family on the verge of, during, and just after the Civil War. It's fascinating for all the reasons collections of period letters are such a treasure, especially when the letters are written without any eye to an audience. We see from the inside the idyllic life of a loving family, who are convinced that their way is God's plan for the world--they genuinely care for their "childish" slaves nearly as much as t This is the abridged version (at almost 700 pages) of the letters of a Georgia plantation family on the verge of, during, and just after the Civil War. It's fascinating for all the reasons collections of period letters are such a treasure, especially when the letters are written without any eye to an audience. We see from the inside the idyllic life of a loving family, who are convinced that their way is God's plan for the world--they genuinely care for their "childish" slaves nearly as much as they cherish their children. When sickness strikes, the nursing and the (largely ineffective) doctoring is spread among them all. But they don't question that way of life--Lincoln and the Northerners, the "Lincolnists" are seen as willful destroyers. And of course everything they feared came to pass--the south was torn up, their plantation burned and stripped of everything of value, and they were scattered around--those who survived--to adjust to change. Robert Manson Myers, in selecting the letters, centered them around Charles Colcock Jones, Jr. who was made mayor of a city at the age of 29 because of his dynamism, erudition, and his deep faith. We see him gradually alter into a military man, though he suppresses the worst details because he's writing to his mother, his sisters, his aging pastor of a father. We see him pursue a frustrating case where another pastor came to live at the house, seduced a black servant, and left the girl pregnant. He never discusses this case with his family, as that wouldn't be proper: there are no civil laws covering the situation, so he writes to the man's church, presenting three proofs--that is, the man staying there during the time, the fact that the girl readily said who had fathered her baby, and the fact that the "mulatto" baby looks just like the father. In turn, the church authorities of the man's home explain how each charge could be wrong. Even when evidence turns up that the man had done this before, the churchmen still are reluctant to act when their man swears an oath, and he's so upstanding in all other regards. You see both sides trying to figure out what to do when there are no laws--except that blacks and whites cannot marry, therefore the man could not be charged with false promises. Watching these people struggle to deal with justice in circumstances that we, in modern times, know were rife with injustice makes tough reading. Watching the war from the southern viewpoint, as all the high ideals erode and grim reality just gets worse; watching Jones's first wife die, and his little daughter, because the medical knowledge of the time is ineffective. Watching the family struggle to save the baby, whose ears are leaking nasty stuff--they finally resort to baths of burnt brandy, which (unknown to them) kills germs. The baby survives. Their earnestness, their mutual love, their faith while they cannot see the injustice of their entire way of life does not make this book an easy read, but it's sure an absorbing one.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mom

    Children of Pride is an absolutely incredible, amazing book. It consists of a collection of letters between members of a Georgia family from 1854-1868 -- just before, during and after the Civil War. You don't have to be interested in history to appreciate this book; if you are interested in people, then you will find the book engrossing (and learn a lot of history along the way!). The paterfamilias, Dr. Colcock Jones, is a retired Presbyterian minister, a published author, a missionary to the sla Children of Pride is an absolutely incredible, amazing book. It consists of a collection of letters between members of a Georgia family from 1854-1868 -- just before, during and after the Civil War. You don't have to be interested in history to appreciate this book; if you are interested in people, then you will find the book engrossing (and learn a lot of history along the way!). The paterfamilias, Dr. Colcock Jones, is a retired Presbyterian minister, a published author, a missionary to the slave population. His wife Mary helps to oversee their 3 plantations and more than 100 slaves, and spends much time entertaining, visiting, and graciously managing her household. As the letters begin, the oldest son is attending Harvard Law School, the second son, a recent Princeton graduate, is in medical school, and the youngest child, a daughter, lives at home preparing for her expected life as a Southern woman of means. One of the amazing things about this book is the eloquence of their writing; even just between child and parent, the writing is formal and erudite. Interestingly, after a brief prologue introducing the characters, the letters tell the entire story, without footnotes, without narration. The letters themselves read like a complete novel (an intimate and intense Gone with the Wind). Reading the letters, I was stunned at how their lives were upended by the war -- from a comfortable privileged life, to confusion and grief and then terror as the war progressed, to destitution and "a skeleton world" at the end. But the thought uppermost in my mind after finishing the book was puzzlement. These were good kind intelligent people -- how could they not see the inherent evil of slavery? But they didn't. These kind generous people truly believed in the rightness of slavery. At close to 2000 pages, starting this book is an intense commitment, but, wow, one of the best, most emotional and enlightening books ever!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anne Slater

    I read ALL of the original 1400 page (plus the 300 page who's who) in the spring of 1973 when my family (me as adult) was in France, way out in the country. I borrowed it from the USIA library which was (is now??) on the 4th floor of the magnificent city library of Clermont-Ferrand, an hour's drive away from the village we lived near. An utterly engrossing story is told in these pages, letters to and from many people of this one Presbyterian Southern family. They had owned slaves, but had given t I read ALL of the original 1400 page (plus the 300 page who's who) in the spring of 1973 when my family (me as adult) was in France, way out in the country. I borrowed it from the USIA library which was (is now??) on the 4th floor of the magnificent city library of Clermont-Ferrand, an hour's drive away from the village we lived near. An utterly engrossing story is told in these pages, letters to and from many people of this one Presbyterian Southern family. They had owned slaves, but had given them their freedom long before (If I am remembering correctly). The one thing that made it possible for me to take in this story (it seemed at first like lots of people all speaking at once)was that we had no radio, a rented television that did not work very well (and was in our bedroom, where there were no chairs, and freezing cold). No distractions. No wonder this book won the 1972 National Book Award. Robert Manson's judicious editing, his succinct and meaty footnotes, and 300 pages of who's who to turn to every so often, made this a pearl of a book. A string of pearls. Two or three sides of every argument were revealed, the tragedies and the (small) triumphs... If you love a good book, can allow yourself to be drawn in, read the full length version. It takes the whole family to tell the story.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    Really interesting, although I wish there were maps so I could pinpoint the places they are talking about. I know the coastal area just well enough to be frustrated by this. However, the book itself is great. It confirmed some things that I had always heard about the war and the post-war time.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

    This is a collection of letters written before, during and after the Civil War from members of a southern family to each other. The sons went to Harvard so the northern view is expressed. Fascinating!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    A fascinating look at life on a Georgia plantation during the civil war through letters of the family. I can't believe I'm the only person on Shelfari who has read this. I know somebody who became so interested in this that they went down to Georgia and found the remains of the mansion. A fascinating look at life on a Georgia plantation during the civil war through letters of the family. I can't believe I'm the only person on Shelfari who has read this. I know somebody who became so interested in this that they went down to Georgia and found the remains of the mansion.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    This was a life changer for me because I did it for my Master s degree back in the 80s

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cecelia114

    Excellent, especially for Civil War buffs.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Missmath144

    Fascinating collection of letters written before, during and after the Civil War.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    David Buttolph was my great, great uncle

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lois

    Although a tremendous undertaking, this historical non-fiction will give you an unmatched experience of plantation life in Georgia before, during and after the Civil War. It is essentially a case study, focusing on the events of these times through the lives of one family- that of Rev. CC and Mary Jones of Liberty County, GA. revealed through their extended family's exchanged correspondence. Deeply religious, and yet deeply believing in the moral rectitude of their position as masters over "the Although a tremendous undertaking, this historical non-fiction will give you an unmatched experience of plantation life in Georgia before, during and after the Civil War. It is essentially a case study, focusing on the events of these times through the lives of one family- that of Rev. CC and Mary Jones of Liberty County, GA. revealed through their extended family's exchanged correspondence. Deeply religious, and yet deeply believing in the moral rectitude of their position as masters over "the people" (black servants, not once referred to as slaves) the Reverend Jones disagreed that the war was being fought to maintain the South's economic system: "We are fighting for our liberty and independence, not for our interests. They certainly are involved, but they are secondary." Meanwhile, his wife, Mary, foreshadows the great tragedy which is about to overtake her family and friends, writing in 1860: "Our commonest blessings are our greatest; we need only to be deprived of them to feel it so." A wonderful resource, but a read for only the dedicated few.

  18. 5 out of 5

    George Keenan

    I have the first edition which my family gave me. I am Charles Colcock Jones' great great great great grandson which feels very strange to state given the horrors of slavery my ancestors participated in and the value my father, Jones' great great great grandson, imparted to me to be actively against racism and viewing blacks as inferiors to white people. I look to forward to reading this book so that I can learn more about one of the most important periods of our young nation's history. Another bo I have the first edition which my family gave me. I am Charles Colcock Jones' great great great great grandson which feels very strange to state given the horrors of slavery my ancestors participated in and the value my father, Jones' great great great grandson, imparted to me to be actively against racism and viewing blacks as inferiors to white people. I look to forward to reading this book so that I can learn more about one of the most important periods of our young nation's history. Another book which may be of interest is this one about Jones' great grandson: War and Healing: Stanhope Bayne-Jones and the Maturing of American Medicine (Southern Biography Series) https://www.amazon.com/dp/080711717X/...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    My five stars are for the unabridged version, which I was able to find through a used book source. It's three huge volumes, but reading in full gave me a sense like no other of living through the years before, during, and after the Civil War in coastal Georgia. The letters of this extended family are so thorough and detailed I really felt like I knew them and understood the times in a way I never had before. I read this in 2010 but it still ranks as one of my greatest reading experiences. I've r My five stars are for the unabridged version, which I was able to find through a used book source. It's three huge volumes, but reading in full gave me a sense like no other of living through the years before, during, and after the Civil War in coastal Georgia. The letters of this extended family are so thorough and detailed I really felt like I knew them and understood the times in a way I never had before. I read this in 2010 but it still ranks as one of my greatest reading experiences. I've recommended the unabridged version to others over the years as one of the best ways to understand the Southern experience during this time period.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Marsha Valance

    Provides a detailed picture of plantation life in Georgia before, during, and after the War Between the States. National Book Award for History (1973), Fletcher Pratt Award (1972), Museum of the Confederacy Founders Award (1972)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jolaine

    This is one of the most powerful and moving books I've ever read. This is one of the most powerful and moving books I've ever read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    ELB

    Patrick, March 10,2015 Wrote an excellent review. This book is very very long, but it is one that I became lost in. I enjoyed it very much; it is much more interesting to read a book wrote by people that actually lived the experiences they are writing about.. The story they are telling by writing letters to one another transported this reader back in time. This book is so different from most books that deal with this time period. These people were actually opening their hearts to one another abo Patrick, March 10,2015 Wrote an excellent review. This book is very very long, but it is one that I became lost in. I enjoyed it very much; it is much more interesting to read a book wrote by people that actually lived the experiences they are writing about.. The story they are telling by writing letters to one another transported this reader back in time. This book is so different from most books that deal with this time period. These people were actually opening their hearts to one another about the sad conditions and hardships they were experiencing. It may take a while to read it but it will be worth the time.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    * Understanding Oppression: African American Rights (Then and Now) The Children of Pride: Selected letters of the family of the Rev. Dr. Charles Colcock Jones from the years 1860-1868; A New, Abridged Edition by Robert Manson Myers #history #americas slavery

  24. 5 out of 5

    Robin Lee Hatcher

    I own and have read the unabridged version of The Children of Pride. Excellent. The very best research for any writer of Civil War era fiction.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marsha

    Civil war-era letters NPR --

  26. 4 out of 5

    Austin

  27. 5 out of 5

    George

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joe Spann

  29. 4 out of 5

    Karen Cascio

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lawyer

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.