counter create hit The Wound of Knowledge: Christian Spirituality from the New Testament to St. John of the Cross - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Wound of Knowledge: Christian Spirituality from the New Testament to St. John of the Cross

Availability: Ready to download

The Wound of Knowledge is a penetrating psychological and intellectual analysis of Christian spirituality.


Compare

The Wound of Knowledge is a penetrating psychological and intellectual analysis of Christian spirituality.

30 review for The Wound of Knowledge: Christian Spirituality from the New Testament to St. John of the Cross

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Williams writes a selected history of Christian spirituality from the New Testament to St. John of the Cross. It highlights particular thinkers and is heavy on the emphasis of suffering, of darkness, of the wounding coming from the Christian life, and the transformation such wounding can provide. "If we believe we can experience our healing without deepening our hurt, we have understood nothing of the roots of our faith..." (11) Not to make it sound dour as it is a delightful delving into a spi Williams writes a selected history of Christian spirituality from the New Testament to St. John of the Cross. It highlights particular thinkers and is heavy on the emphasis of suffering, of darkness, of the wounding coming from the Christian life, and the transformation such wounding can provide. "If we believe we can experience our healing without deepening our hurt, we have understood nothing of the roots of our faith..." (11) Not to make it sound dour as it is a delightful delving into a spirituality of conflict, centered on Jesus crucified. He particularly explores the New Testament, Ignatius, Irenaeus, Clement, Origen, Athanasius, the Cappadocian Fathers (especially Gregory of Nyssa), Augustine, Antony, Cassian, Bernard, Dionysius, Aquinas, Eckhart, the late medieval mystics, Luther (in a brooding chapter), and St. John of the Cross and offers deep insight (almost rehabilitating Eckhart for me) and sometimes frank acknowledgement of limitations (especially with Clement's "internalizing" of the gospel and Dionysius, before his rehabilitation by Maximus). He has good discussions of martyrs, gnosticism, Platonism, and monasticism "The end of the believer's life is knowledge of God in conformity to God. Knowledge of God is not a subject's conceptual grasp of an object, it is sharing what God is - more boldy, you might say sharing God's 'experience'. God is known in and by the exercise of crucifying compassion; if we are like him in that, we know him."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Anderson

    This is a stunning book, both in terms of the way Williams is able to cogently explain so much of the movement of Christian spirituality over the centuries and also in the really beautiful nature of his prose. It was soul nourishing much like the Christian Wiman book (My Bright Abyss) I read recently and it also made my brain feel two sizes bigger (in a good way). Highly recommended. The chapters on Augustine and St. John of the Cross especially blew me away.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rex

    In fewer than 200 pages, Rowan Williams (a young man at the time of writing, but none the less erudite for it) tackles the history of classical Christian spirituality, focusing on a few major themes and pivotal figures “from the New Testament to Saint John of the Cross.” Williams does not hesitate to reproach strands of the tradition he views as problematic, and I’m not persuaded of a few of his critiques, but his overall treatment of the development of Christian spirituality is compelling and i In fewer than 200 pages, Rowan Williams (a young man at the time of writing, but none the less erudite for it) tackles the history of classical Christian spirituality, focusing on a few major themes and pivotal figures “from the New Testament to Saint John of the Cross.” Williams does not hesitate to reproach strands of the tradition he views as problematic, and I’m not persuaded of a few of his critiques, but his overall treatment of the development of Christian spirituality is compelling and insightful. Complaint might be made about style and readability. Almost anything Rowan Williams says is interesting, and at times his rhetoric swells to lyricism, but he often couches his point in complex sentences and meandering paragraphs, which slows down a book that, given its relative brevity and scope, ought to be a quick and accessible read. But as a study in Christian spirituality, it remains valuable, and one also glimpses in this essay some of the ideas that most shaped Williams’s lifelong religious sensibilities.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Rios

    As a survey of the history of spirituality, this was fine. Williams covered the basics in Church history from (as the subtitle suggests) the New Testament to St John of the Cross. However, as a book with a thesis that makes a point--I have no idea what I've just read. What is the wound of knowledge? Why should I want to be wounded? How does knowledge wound us? What does it even mean to be 'spiritual' as a Christian? For my money, this book exhibits the most disappointing ratio between promising As a survey of the history of spirituality, this was fine. Williams covered the basics in Church history from (as the subtitle suggests) the New Testament to St John of the Cross. However, as a book with a thesis that makes a point--I have no idea what I've just read. What is the wound of knowledge? Why should I want to be wounded? How does knowledge wound us? What does it even mean to be 'spiritual' as a Christian? For my money, this book exhibits the most disappointing ratio between promising title and actual content that I've encountered in recent memory. If you're interested in a history of spirituality, read Evelyn Underhill's "The Mystics of the Church" instead. It's better written, makes clearer judgments, and will leave you with something substantive and spiritually nutritious to mull over.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bob Price

    How 'Spiritual' can you be? Does the Christian church have anything to offer anymore about Spirituality? Did it ever? In Christian Spirituality, Rowan Williams traces the history of spiritual thought from the New Testament to St. John of the Cross, a period of almost 1600 years....in about two hundred pages. That in of itself should tell you what sort of book we are in for. This book was originally written when the Archbishop of Canterbury was only 29 years old. (Now I'm starting to feel a bit of How 'Spiritual' can you be? Does the Christian church have anything to offer anymore about Spirituality? Did it ever? In Christian Spirituality, Rowan Williams traces the history of spiritual thought from the New Testament to St. John of the Cross, a period of almost 1600 years....in about two hundred pages. That in of itself should tell you what sort of book we are in for. This book was originally written when the Archbishop of Canterbury was only 29 years old. (Now I'm starting to feel a bit of the crunch on me!) Williams is undoubtedly brilliant and we see his genius in this book. He paints broad pictures and yet is able to probe the depths of some of the greatest thinkers in Christian history. We see him deal equally ably with Augustine, Aquinas, Meister Eckhart and Martin Luther. Overall, the writing is very clear and easy to read. The pacing seems a bit rushed, but with over 1500 years of history to cover in 200 pages, it has to be. The goal in writing this book seems to have been to open the door for the modern day Christian for different spiritual traditions within the early church. While he analyzes the theology involved, the main emphasis is on the implications for a spiritual theology. What emerges then is a good solid basic introduction to many different theologians. It is a book designed to spur you on to further reading and different studies. I highly recommend this book for pastors and interested lay people within the church. Non Christians may find this book and its subject matter a bit dull. Grade: B

  6. 4 out of 5

    James Wheeler

    Fantastic introduction to the history of spirituality and some of the great figures that have shaped the Christian traditions. I enjoyed how W. explores the deep motivations and desires of the people he presents. I will try to post a couple of quotes later.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Marc Schneider

    Every English-speaking Christian should read this book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    A compact, nourishing read. Although not a book for novices, Williams is clear and readable, and takes care to explain various concepts along the way. Williams charts the first 1500 years of Christian spirituality, showing how, at its core, its not a case of ecstatic visions, special techniques or transcending the material, but is a real engagement with life in all its joy and pain. A great introduction to a variety of Christian thinkers and writers. This is a book I'll definitely return to. John A compact, nourishing read. Although not a book for novices, Williams is clear and readable, and takes care to explain various concepts along the way. Williams charts the first 1500 years of Christian spirituality, showing how, at its core, its not a case of ecstatic visions, special techniques or transcending the material, but is a real engagement with life in all its joy and pain. A great introduction to a variety of Christian thinkers and writers. This is a book I'll definitely return to. John of the Cross 'accepts the fact that there is a draining and crucifying conflict at the centre of Christian living and refuses to countenance any joy or celebration which has not faced this conflict and endured it.' (p.180)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tom Greentree

    A rapid tour through Christian spirituality from St Paul to St John of the Cross, focusing on the centrality is the cross of Christ and the necessary suffering inherent within true Christian maturation.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nick Jordan

    Brilliant book albeit very dense. You've got to love that he was 29 when this classic was published. I'm certain I should reread it some day if I want to digest more of what is here. Brilliant book albeit very dense. You've got to love that he was 29 when this classic was published. I'm certain I should reread it some day if I want to digest more of what is here.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Graham

    A very thorough reading in early theological formation. This was far more intensely academic than anticipated (not saying that's a bad thing at all). This was my first encounter with Williams. He covers the Church Fathers very well, digging into the important players in the early development of Christian Spiritual theology (Ignatius, Iranaeus, Origen, the Cappadocians, Augustine etc.). Where he comes up short, in my opinion is the huge jump from the early 6th century to the 12th. He provides ver A very thorough reading in early theological formation. This was far more intensely academic than anticipated (not saying that's a bad thing at all). This was my first encounter with Williams. He covers the Church Fathers very well, digging into the important players in the early development of Christian Spiritual theology (Ignatius, Iranaeus, Origen, the Cappadocians, Augustine etc.). Where he comes up short, in my opinion is the huge jump from the early 6th century to the 12th. He provides very little on anything between the early monastics and the rise of scholasticism (he inlcudes some discussion of Pseudo-Dionysius which is helpful). The other issue is the quick conclusion. The final paragraphs are very well composed, but he comes to a very abrupt end after dealing with St. John of the Cross in great detail. A separate chapter to wrap up would have helped the overall impression of the book. However, overall, it is a very good guide to understanding the development of Christian thought.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Matt Ely

    3.5, rounded up for the possibility of partial re-reads. This is a unique history of the Christian religion. Williams focuses in on the spiritual questions and struggles that were prominent from the religion's founding to the Counter-Reformation. He does this through the lens of the most famous theologians in each era, teasing out how they relate to their predecessors and what they added to the conversation. It's a good overview and in certainly helped me see connections I wouldn't have seen oth 3.5, rounded up for the possibility of partial re-reads. This is a unique history of the Christian religion. Williams focuses in on the spiritual questions and struggles that were prominent from the religion's founding to the Counter-Reformation. He does this through the lens of the most famous theologians in each era, teasing out how they relate to their predecessors and what they added to the conversation. It's a good overview and in certainly helped me see connections I wouldn't have seen otherwise. The issue is that he very much jumps straight into the deep end. It's a dense read (not a problem, just a note) and it took me until the section on Origen to really get a feel for what he was trying to accomplish. Ultimately I think the book might be best used as reference material, summaries on important thinkers and directions for further reading. As a single volume read straight through, it's a bit unwieldy.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Robert Heckner

    2020 reread review: This is a magnificent study of Christian Spirituality in its deep paradoxes and struggles from the New Testament to the work of Saint John of the Cross. Williams is an excellent communicator and erudite theological interpreter, commentator, and thinker. I had forgot how formative to my own spiritual life and interest and attitude in/ to theology this book has been and continues to be. Furthermore, having recently finished Williams’ “Anglican Identities” before this reread, I a 2020 reread review: This is a magnificent study of Christian Spirituality in its deep paradoxes and struggles from the New Testament to the work of Saint John of the Cross. Williams is an excellent communicator and erudite theological interpreter, commentator, and thinker. I had forgot how formative to my own spiritual life and interest and attitude in/ to theology this book has been and continues to be. Furthermore, having recently finished Williams’ “Anglican Identities” before this reread, I am struck with a sense that there is a way in which the two works can be read a somewhat coherent whole leading the reader through Christian spirituality from the New Testament into its particularly Anglican incarnation in the modern era.

  14. 4 out of 5

    David

    This book provides just what it promises - a history of Christian spirituality from Paul on through over 1500 years to St. John of the Cross. Included in this overview are all sorts of greats: Gregory of Nyssa, Origen, Augustine, Aquinas, Luther. Don't let "overview" fool you though, this is not necessarily an easy read. That is not to say it is too difficult either, it is just that if you see "spirituality" and think simplistic, this is not. It is more spiritual theology. Anyway, Williams is a This book provides just what it promises - a history of Christian spirituality from Paul on through over 1500 years to St. John of the Cross. Included in this overview are all sorts of greats: Gregory of Nyssa, Origen, Augustine, Aquinas, Luther. Don't let "overview" fool you though, this is not necessarily an easy read. That is not to say it is too difficult either, it is just that if you see "spirituality" and think simplistic, this is not. It is more spiritual theology. Anyway, Williams is a fantastic writer and has a good grasp on all the people he writes about. For those interested in Christian classics, the sort of spiritual books that have stood the test of time, check this one out.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kate Davis

    Read for Theology of Spiritual Formation with Chelle Stearns Informative of progression of theology through the early church, but written densely. Great for information, not for pleasure. (Personally: see my AnnBib on it)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Adam Shaeffer

    An insightful discussion of the first 1600 years of Christian spirituality. Williams draws out the continuities and changes between traditions and eras very well. A must read for the scholar of Christian spirituality today.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    Welby is a good replacement, but Williams had a brain like few others on this earth.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Arcement

    The strength of Williams's book is the clarity by which he expresses the flow of the spiritual movements through Christian history. He weaves a seamless tapestry of this rich and varied tradition. The strength of Williams's book is the clarity by which he expresses the flow of the spiritual movements through Christian history. He weaves a seamless tapestry of this rich and varied tradition.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    I had a hard time getting started with this book but I'm glad I stuck with it. There is a lot here - too much to absorb in one reading. I'll be coming back to this one. I had a hard time getting started with this book but I'm glad I stuck with it. There is a lot here - too much to absorb in one reading. I'll be coming back to this one.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jon Beadle

    Good book. It took me a while given that I am not as familiar with the source material alluded to in nearly every sentence. But worth a read!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Eshleman-Robles

  22. 5 out of 5

    Darius Parker

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  24. 5 out of 5

    Agusrachmat

  25. 4 out of 5

    Holly LaFon

  26. 4 out of 5

    daniel greeson

  27. 4 out of 5

    Carlos

  28. 4 out of 5

    Khegan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Luke Jamison

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Coffman

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.