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The Losing War: Plan Colombia and Beyond

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Plan Colombia was an ambitious, multibillion dollar program of American aid to the country of Colombia to fight that nation's recreational drug industry. First signed into law by President Clinton in 2000, the program would, over a twelve year period, provide the Colombian government with more money than every other country in the region. But how successful was Plan Colomb Plan Colombia was an ambitious, multibillion dollar program of American aid to the country of Colombia to fight that nation's recreational drug industry. First signed into law by President Clinton in 2000, the program would, over a twelve year period, provide the Colombian government with more money than every other country in the region. But how successful was Plan Colombia, and is it a model worthwhile in applying to other countries? In The Losing War, Jonathan D. Rosen applies international relations theory to understand how the goals and objectives of Plan Colombia evolved over time, particularly after the events of 9/11. Various individuals, including Alvaro Uribe, the president of Colombia from 2002-2010, and George W. Bush, argued that Plan Colombia should be used as a model to help other countries combat drug trafficking. Plan Colombia was not mentioned in the Obama administration's 2011 budget proposal and no longer exists today. Rosen concludes that the policy failed to make substantial inroads in curtailing drug cultivation, production, or trafficking, thus calling into question the value of applying the same strategy to other countries, such as Mexico, in the present or future.


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Plan Colombia was an ambitious, multibillion dollar program of American aid to the country of Colombia to fight that nation's recreational drug industry. First signed into law by President Clinton in 2000, the program would, over a twelve year period, provide the Colombian government with more money than every other country in the region. But how successful was Plan Colomb Plan Colombia was an ambitious, multibillion dollar program of American aid to the country of Colombia to fight that nation's recreational drug industry. First signed into law by President Clinton in 2000, the program would, over a twelve year period, provide the Colombian government with more money than every other country in the region. But how successful was Plan Colombia, and is it a model worthwhile in applying to other countries? In The Losing War, Jonathan D. Rosen applies international relations theory to understand how the goals and objectives of Plan Colombia evolved over time, particularly after the events of 9/11. Various individuals, including Alvaro Uribe, the president of Colombia from 2002-2010, and George W. Bush, argued that Plan Colombia should be used as a model to help other countries combat drug trafficking. Plan Colombia was not mentioned in the Obama administration's 2011 budget proposal and no longer exists today. Rosen concludes that the policy failed to make substantial inroads in curtailing drug cultivation, production, or trafficking, thus calling into question the value of applying the same strategy to other countries, such as Mexico, in the present or future.

10 review for The Losing War: Plan Colombia and Beyond

  1. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin

    Plan Columbia was a government program designed to combat drug production and trafficking in Columbia. It was started by Bill Clinton in 2000 and continued through the Bush 43 administration but was not mentioned in Obama's 2011 budget. The United States dumped millions of dollars into the program in what can be objectively considered a failure. Drug production actually increased over the course of Plan Columbia and had detrimental effects especially on the rural poor population that were poison Plan Columbia was a government program designed to combat drug production and trafficking in Columbia. It was started by Bill Clinton in 2000 and continued through the Bush 43 administration but was not mentioned in Obama's 2011 budget. The United States dumped millions of dollars into the program in what can be objectively considered a failure. Drug production actually increased over the course of Plan Columbia and had detrimental effects especially on the rural poor population that were poisoned and displaced due to the crop spraying methods employed by the United States. Overall the author, Jonathan D. Rosen, makes a clear and argument supporting his assessment that supplyside War on Drugs is ineffective at best and detrimental and expensive at best. The author should have gone into more depth with the ramifications of Plan Columbia on US drug policy in general. He went too deep into the minutia of International Relations Theory and the conclusions could have been strengthened or more engaging if Rosen took up a comparative approach with Columbia and Mexico or Afghanistan.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mariana

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dan Bell

  5. 4 out of 5

    D.marvelli

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Lear

  7. 4 out of 5

    Diane Velez

  8. 4 out of 5

    VirgĂ­nia Brito

  9. 5 out of 5

    John

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Therrien

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