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The internationally bestselling, award-winning Japanese thriller about a child who may be the future of the human race -- or the cause of its extinction. During a briefing in Washington D.C., the President is informed of a threat to national security: a three-year-old boy named Akili, who is already the smartest being on the planet. Representing the next step in human evo The internationally bestselling, award-winning Japanese thriller about a child who may be the future of the human race -- or the cause of its extinction. During a briefing in Washington D.C., the President is informed of a threat to national security: a three-year-old boy named Akili, who is already the smartest being on the planet. Representing the next step in human evolution, Akili can perceive patterns and predict future events better than most supercomputers, and is capable of manipulating grand-scale events like pieces on a chess board. And yet, for all that power, Akili has the emotional maturity of a child -- which might make him the most dangerous threat humanity has ever faced. An American soldier, Jonathan Yeager, leads an international team of elite operatives deep into the heart of the Congolese jungle under Presidential orders to destroy this threat to humanity before Akili's full potential can be realized. But Yeager has a very sick child, and Akili's advanced knowledge of all things, medicine included, may be Yeager's only hope for saving his son's life. Soon Yeager finds himself caught between following his orders and saving a creature with a hidden agenda, who plans to either save humanity as we know it -- or destroy it.


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The internationally bestselling, award-winning Japanese thriller about a child who may be the future of the human race -- or the cause of its extinction. During a briefing in Washington D.C., the President is informed of a threat to national security: a three-year-old boy named Akili, who is already the smartest being on the planet. Representing the next step in human evo The internationally bestselling, award-winning Japanese thriller about a child who may be the future of the human race -- or the cause of its extinction. During a briefing in Washington D.C., the President is informed of a threat to national security: a three-year-old boy named Akili, who is already the smartest being on the planet. Representing the next step in human evolution, Akili can perceive patterns and predict future events better than most supercomputers, and is capable of manipulating grand-scale events like pieces on a chess board. And yet, for all that power, Akili has the emotional maturity of a child -- which might make him the most dangerous threat humanity has ever faced. An American soldier, Jonathan Yeager, leads an international team of elite operatives deep into the heart of the Congolese jungle under Presidential orders to destroy this threat to humanity before Akili's full potential can be realized. But Yeager has a very sick child, and Akili's advanced knowledge of all things, medicine included, may be Yeager's only hope for saving his son's life. Soon Yeager finds himself caught between following his orders and saving a creature with a hidden agenda, who plans to either save humanity as we know it -- or destroy it.

30 review for Genocide of One

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    I was expecting a thriller, but this isn't. There were some really juvenile politics which unconvincingly put the 2 main characters in danger. Worse, one is supposed to be really smart & yet seems to have a lot of trouble putting obvious facts together. On top of that, the author gets bogged down into scientific detail that is needlessly complex & long winded - a lecture, not a thriller. That's the worst. If I want to know about the intricacies of G-protein-coupled receptors, ligands, & how to s I was expecting a thriller, but this isn't. There were some really juvenile politics which unconvincingly put the 2 main characters in danger. Worse, one is supposed to be really smart & yet seems to have a lot of trouble putting obvious facts together. On top of that, the author gets bogged down into scientific detail that is needlessly complex & long winded - a lecture, not a thriller. That's the worst. If I want to know about the intricacies of G-protein-coupled receptors, ligands, & how to synthesize antagonists with structural optimization, I'd read a nonfiction book on the subject. I do NOT!!! Cutting loose!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Possibly some spoilers 12/2 - I'm really enjoying the feeling of suspended tension in 'Hawk's' side of the story, but Kento's story is getting a bit bogged down in the details of biological science. Reading the explanations of what Kento's father wants him to do, my eyes were starting to glaze over with the complexity of it all. It seems clear to me that Takano did his research (or has a background in biology), but I really wish he hadn't been quite so thorough with his explanations, it's just a Possibly some spoilers 12/2 - I'm really enjoying the feeling of suspended tension in 'Hawk's' side of the story, but Kento's story is getting a bit bogged down in the details of biological science. Reading the explanations of what Kento's father wants him to do, my eyes were starting to glaze over with the complexity of it all. It seems clear to me that Takano did his research (or has a background in biology), but I really wish he hadn't been quite so thorough with his explanations, it's just a bit too much for someone with a 'no science' background. It's like he knows his professor will be reading this book and feels great pressure to get the science absolutely right and explain everything as if this is an exam instead of fiction. To be continued... 17/2 - I'm trying really hard to enjoy this because it has such a promising plot (it started out with four stars, but if I was to continue to be honest about my feelings regarding the book I couldn't leave the rating at four, it had to come down to three). It could be soooo good! but there are just too many incomprehensible medical, biological, and technical computer details. Any time something exciting starts to happen (whenever Hawk and his men in the Congo show up, which isn't nearly often enough) the chapter ends and the POV changes to one of the scientists who play a role in bringing the story together and the reader is bombarded with information about a highly technical subject that most of us just don't have the expertise to understand or the tolerance to find the depth of detail given all that interesting. The subjects of DNA, genetic mutations, code breaking, viruses, and so on are all interesting, but Takano just goes into so much detail that, at frequent points, I feel like I'm reading a non-fiction journal article aimed at professionals of the field. I was expecting a thrill ride, not a lecture. To be continued... 27/2 - GOD! I have been reading this for.ever.. I have to finish this tonight, there are other books which look really enticing and more interesting than this. My feelings haven't really changed regarding everything I said in my previous updates. The things that are annoying continue to be annoying, and the things that aren't annoying continue to be completely overshadowed by the aforementioned annoying things. To be continued... 28/2 - FINISHED FINALLY!! I feel like I've been reading this for months. In parts it's been a real tough slog, then others the story got very exciting and attention-holding. I will reiterate what I've said a number of times now - there was just too much technical detail. I felt like the author had read reviews of other sci-fi/action thrillers where the reviewers had complained about the lack of detail and realistic explanation as to how magical-seeming science stuff worked, and decided that no one was going to make the same complaint of his book. Unfortunately he went about 100 miles too far with his explanations, leaving this reader with the feeling of complete bemusement regarding all the scientific explanations about how new drugs are made. I feel compelled to give you an example, so below is a passage taken from reasonably early on in the book, page 53. As he waited for the laptop to boot up, he read further in his father's message. The research project: 1. I want you to design an agonist for an orphan receptor and synthesize it. 2. Details about the target GPCR are in the white laptop. 3. You have to complete the project by February 28. Kento let out a groan. This was ridiculous. He read the instructions again, carefully, to make sure he was getting it. This was all a little out of his field. The outer surfaces of cells have several types of receptors, all of which are proteins. As the name implies, receptors have pocketlike depressions that accept and bind to certain types of ligands and through this binding control cell function. This is how hormones are bound by the cells and how hormones influence cells to take a particular form and/or perform certain functions. For example, ligands in the form of male and female steroid hormones play a role in muscle development and skin conditioning. The orphan receptors mentioned in his father's message are bodies whose function - and the ligands they bind with - are unknown. His father wanted him to find a material, an agonist, that would activate orphan receptors. The GPCRs his father mentioned - G-protein-coupled receptors - are long, ropelike proteins that loop seven times inside the cell wall and out again, making a pocket in the middle. It is very hard to determine the pocket's shape, and designing a ligand to bond with it is extremely difficult. To carry out his father's instructions would require a huge research organisation - like a pharmaceuticals company - as well as top flight researchers, more than a decade of work, and tens of billions of yen. Even then the hurdle would be so great the project might fail. Yet here his father was asking a second-year MA student, alone, with only five million yen to complete the task in a month. Was he crazy? Did his father actually have any chance of succeeding? The clues to that would lie in the lab logbook, but the contents were way out of Kento's field of expertise. There were only four pages of notes in the logbook. The first research goal, according to the notes, was to "design an agonist for the mutant type GPR769 and synthesize it". Ah, Kento thought. So this mutant protein, GPR769, was the name of the target orphan receptor. The agonist was the drug that would bind with this receptor and activate the cell - in other words, an artificially created ligand. But that was as far as Kento could follow. The rest of the procedures read: Structural analysis of mutant type GPR769 CADD (design in silico) Synthesize Binding assay in vitro In vivo activity assessment Other than the part about synthesizing, this all required expertise in other disciplines, and Kento couldn't judge whether these were appropriate directions or not. But he did get the impression that his father had greatly underestimated the difficulties of drug development. Structural optimization of the synthesized compound, clinical trials on humans - these critical and time-consuming phases of development were entirely missing. Am I stupid, or does having multiple passages like that throughout the book make other people's brains hurt with information overload? Am I the only one who finds all that information just too dense for what originally appears to be an action thriller? PopSugar 2015 Reading Challenge: A Book with a Number in the Title

  3. 5 out of 5

    Squire

    For the most part, this is an exceptional thriller: fast-paced, exciting and suspenseful. But if suffers from some complex and detailed scientific processes that the author simplifies for the purposes of his story. These sections slow the story down and Takano ends up talking down to his readers in the process. It also has a an unsophisticated approach to political satire that detracts from the books pleasures. In fact, I'm not certain it IS satire. The tone of the work switches from serious to For the most part, this is an exceptional thriller: fast-paced, exciting and suspenseful. But if suffers from some complex and detailed scientific processes that the author simplifies for the purposes of his story. These sections slow the story down and Takano ends up talking down to his readers in the process. It also has a an unsophisticated approach to political satire that detracts from the books pleasures. In fact, I'm not certain it IS satire. The tone of the work switches from serious to venomous when the action switches to Washington, DC where President Gregory S. Burns and Vice President Daniel Chambers discuss the progress of the war they are conducting in Iraq. And President Burns is caught up in the guilt of his chasing down a dictator because he had projected the hatred he felt towards his father onto said dictator--all after he found religion and stopped drinking. Such a ham-fisted approach almost derails the book, but the story is so strong and engrossing that it survives, like it's heroes, battle-worn and soiled and taking itself way too seriously. But, the author is probably okay with that. He did manage to kill off Vice President Chamberlin in a hijacked drone attack.

  4. 5 out of 5

    ☕️Kimberly

    Five reasons to plug-in and listen to Genocide of One If you like, thrillers that take you deep into the jungle, into the office of the President and avoiding the police in the streets of Japan you will love the story that unfolds in Genocide of One. What if a child was born that was smarter than our supercomputers? Who at age three could crack our security codes but still cried when he was tired? American soldier, Jonathan Yeager takes an elite team into the Congolese jungle under Presidentia Five reasons to plug-in and listen to Genocide of One If you like, thrillers that take you deep into the jungle, into the office of the President and avoiding the police in the streets of Japan you will love the story that unfolds in Genocide of One. What if a child was born that was smarter than our supercomputers? Who at age three could crack our security codes but still cried when he was tired? American soldier, Jonathan Yeager takes an elite team into the Congolese jungle under Presidential orders to destroy this threat to humanity. Genocide of One shares their mission with us. If you enjoy stories within stories that run parallel and soon find themselves wrapped within the main plot, you will enjoy Genocide of One. Jonathan Yeager has a very sick son with a rare disorder who only has weeks to live. The young child Akili may hold the knowledge to save him. This second thread has us following a young Japanese medical student in a race against the clock. Spies, secret codes and lots of cloak and dagger moments kept me fully engaged. The tale is told in multiple perspectives and one of those is from that of a medical student who recently lost his father and soon finds himself in a race to save two lives. Jonathan is another voice and he takes us deep into the jungle. Each character we come across is developed and felt authentic. Knezevich did an excellent job of giving each character and pov a unique voice. Realism, unfiltered brutality and violence are something you can handle. Takano does not tone down the brutality of war and there were scenes that will forever be etched in my mind. Ones I would prefer to forget. He exposes the cruelest aspects of war and the raw hopelessness young children recruited unwillingly into the cause face. While it was dark, I appreciated the authenticity and questions in raised. Takano weaves a fascinating and well-researched tale. From the original concept to the science fiction and war aspects, it had a realistic vibe that notched up my enjoyment. Genocide of One was dark but there were moments of joy, laughter and humor. As we traveled between characters, I became completely swept up as the tension built. Each storyline was developed allowing me to fully appreciate each aspect.  It was a ride I will not forget and the ending left me both satisfied and hopeful. Audio provided by publisher.This review was originally posted at Caffeinated Book Reviewer

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    A great blend of science and adventure, I couldn't put this thriller down. A new form of human has appeared on earth, superior mentally to the current homo sapiens. How will our society deal with him, as a threat or a blessing? And once that decision is made how will he deal with it? I thoroughly enjoyed this read. The science was well researched and totally believable and the emotional responses of the characters were well written. When I finished I wished there was more. I received this book as A great blend of science and adventure, I couldn't put this thriller down. A new form of human has appeared on earth, superior mentally to the current homo sapiens. How will our society deal with him, as a threat or a blessing? And once that decision is made how will he deal with it? I thoroughly enjoyed this read. The science was well researched and totally believable and the emotional responses of the characters were well written. When I finished I wished there was more. I received this book as part of a goodreads giveaway but the opinions are my own.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carola

    Without spoiling too much: this book simultaneously takes place in the US, Japan and the Congo. We’ve got the US President and those directly surrounding him. We’ve got four mercenaries sent on a mission. We’ve got children born with a deathly illness. We’ve got a Japanese student whose father just passed away. And most of all, we’ve got a three-year-old child named Akili: the next step in human evolution. This book is pretty damn brilliant. When I just started reading, I was afraid this was not Without spoiling too much: this book simultaneously takes place in the US, Japan and the Congo. We’ve got the US President and those directly surrounding him. We’ve got four mercenaries sent on a mission. We’ve got children born with a deathly illness. We’ve got a Japanese student whose father just passed away. And most of all, we’ve got a three-year-old child named Akili: the next step in human evolution. This book is pretty damn brilliant. When I just started reading, I was afraid this was not going to be my type of book. It starts out sounding a lot like a military thriller, but it is in fact a dareIsayit perfect piece of science fiction. The plot of the book is extremely intricate and it all fits and works. By the end we’ve got not a single loose end, and yet it never feels forced. Again without spoiling too much: to me the plot was extremely satisfying, from the beginning to the end. And the plot is also extremely realistic. You can imagine every aspect of it becoming reality. In fact, much of this book is either describing actual events or heavily based on actual events. The book is so convincing that you will even believe in the portrayed consequences of the birth of this evolved hyperintelligent human being. The book really is three things: both thrilling and unpredictable, and also very philosophical. The first two will make you want to keep reading. The last one will creep you out. Because just like the plot, the philosophy is real. The book is full of what-ifs, and Takano manages to hand them to you without it ever becoming tiresome. Now, this book also uses a lot of jargon. I’m convinced Takano is a genius, not just because he convinces me with the science, the military and the political aspects, but also because he still manages to write it down in such a way that my poor Humanities-oriented brain understands (sort of). Again without it ever becoming tiresome. So yes. Read this. FTC disclosure: I received this book for free, courtesy of the publisher, through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michael Jensen

    Man, I wish I could give this 4.5 instead of 4 because there were a lot of things I liked and just a few I didn't. The plot is somewhat standard for this type of present day sci fi thriller. In this case, a new form of human has evolved possibly posing a threat to us much dumber homo sapiens. Naturally some folks want to wipe out a possible threat and a race is on to save the new species. That's the plot in a nutshell. While not reinventing the wheel, the story is well-written (and translated) and Man, I wish I could give this 4.5 instead of 4 because there were a lot of things I liked and just a few I didn't. The plot is somewhat standard for this type of present day sci fi thriller. In this case, a new form of human has evolved possibly posing a threat to us much dumber homo sapiens. Naturally some folks want to wipe out a possible threat and a race is on to save the new species. That's the plot in a nutshell. While not reinventing the wheel, the story is well-written (and translated) and executed with just enough twists to keep you on your toes. The characters are sympathetic and well drawn and have you rooting for them. What I especially enjoyed about Genocide, and found rather remarkable, was how nakedly Takano went after the second President Bush, here barely as President Burns. Takano rakes Bush over the coals for the Iraq War, for torture, for destroying our right to privacy, and pretty much everything else he did. He also mocks him relentlessly for his incurious and jingoistic nature. If, like me, you think the Bush Presidency was a disaster for the world, you'll love it. If not, you'll probably be enraged. It isn't just Bush that Takano goes after. He also blasts Western nations and corporations for their exploitation of Africa, as well as those Africans who are participating in their own continent's wars and genocides. It's pretty blistering all the way around and something the world needs to hear more about, so kudos to Takano. My two minor-ish beefs with the book are that at 500 pages it's a little long for the story it tells. That might partly because of my second beef which is that Takano spends too much dwelling on the scientific aspects of the story involving the very complicated creation of a new drug. Clearly Takano knows his stuff (or so it seems) but he both dwells on it too much and fails to make it particularly understanding or interesting for the reader. Honestly, I'd suggest just skimming those sections. Otherwise, I can definitely recommend this one!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cam

    Suspense thriller set in a barely-masked Bush II timeframe with a bit too much exposition. Good to read if you want another culture's take on the U.S., but I would think a lot of thriller fans would be turned off by the critical look at our internal and external politics. Most of the action is split between the eastern Congo and Tokyo. Researchers stumbled on an evolved human and the U.S. government reacts to what it sees as an existential threat by ordering a mercenary team to execute everyone Suspense thriller set in a barely-masked Bush II timeframe with a bit too much exposition. Good to read if you want another culture's take on the U.S., but I would think a lot of thriller fans would be turned off by the critical look at our internal and external politics. Most of the action is split between the eastern Congo and Tokyo. Researchers stumbled on an evolved human and the U.S. government reacts to what it sees as an existential threat by ordering a mercenary team to execute everyone who knows about the child and it's village. Someone has penetrated U.S. spy organizations, though, and seems to be one step ahead. The team in the Congo realizes that they'd be killed next and decides to extract the researcher and the child. Meanwhile, in Japan, .... This one gets off to a slow start, and lots of science and political commentary slow the pace until it all starts to gell about halfway through. Good enough for thriller fans who like a bit of a challenge and interesting thinking on how the next step of evolution might handle us to survive.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lei

    Most time I'll rate it a 5-star then list it in my favorite bookshelf. But I don't like the end much. I prefer a darker end like the book name itself(the Chinese book name means human extinction, the book only shows some possibilities). Some drug making part is very boring to read, as a normal reader I can't understand most of them, maybe some graphics will help, I skipped most.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Juliana Philippa

    Hodge-podge. team put together by U.S. government to go after a national security threat located in DRC jungle ... and they know little more than that about what they're targeting. It's a big mystery throughout the story what they're actually going after and why (don't read the book summary here, because it stupidly gives it away), but slowly everything starts to come together and different threads begin to make sense. Interesting premise; interesting book. Different storylines, but all very clos Hodge-podge. team put together by U.S. government to go after a national security threat located in DRC jungle ... and they know little more than that about what they're targeting. It's a big mystery throughout the story what they're actually going after and why (don't read the book summary here, because it stupidly gives it away), but slowly everything starts to come together and different threads begin to make sense. Interesting premise; interesting book. Different storylines, but all very closely intertwined. Don't think it really counts as a "suspense" or "thriller" ... maybe thriller, but in a weird and unexpected way. Kept me intrigued throughout and I really wanted to see what would happen, so that's always a good sign. It also had some crazy accurate kernels of wisdom (bolding is my own):Up until the twentieth century only the African continent was left behind by development because the slave trade and cruel colonial control had stolen away the most valuable resource of all—its people. "Humans can't understand that they and other races are the same species. They distinguish themselves by skin color, nationality, religion—even by narrow groupings such as geographical region and family—and see these as their defining features. Individuals from different groups are viewed with hostility, as if they were a different species. This isn't a rational decision but a biological characteristic. The human brain inherently distinguishes different beings and views them as a danger. To me this is proof enough of humans' cruelty." Rubens could understand Heisman's point. "In other words this behavior is preserved in the species because it aids survival. Conversely, if a person isn't on his guard against another race, then he'll be killed by that other race." "True. It's the same logic as when a type of animal that isn't afraid of snakes is then bitten by poisonous snakes, and its numbers decrease. The result is that individuals who are afraid of snakes will survive in greater numbers, and most of their descendants will have an instinctive fear of snakes." "But don't we also have a desire for peace?" "It's much easier to call for world peace than it is to get along with one's neighbor," Heisman replied sarcastically. "Look, war is just another form of cannibalism. Humans use their intelligence to try to hide their instinct for cannibalism. They mix in various kinds of sophistry to justify it—politics, religion, ideology, patriotism—but deep down they have the same desires as animals. People killing other people to defend their territory and chimpanzees going crazy and becoming violent when their domain is invaded—how are these any different?" "Then how do you account for altruistic acts? Some people do what we'd consider unselfish good deeds." As he said this Rubens pictured a seedy-looking Japanese—Kento Koga, whose photo was attached to the report by the DIA. That young man, unappealing and obviously unattractive to women—why would he continue developing a new drug even though he knew it put him in grave danger? "I'm not denying that people also have a good side. But good deeds are seen as virtuous precisely because they run counter to human nature. If these were biologically normal acts, we wouldn't praise them. The only way people can show how good their country is is by not killing people from other countries. But human beings today can't even do that." Rubens knew his debate skills might not be enough to refute Heisman's deep-seated distrust of humans. Heisman might even be hoping that his report would come true, that mankind would be wiped out. "I'm sorry, but I can't cooperate with the Pentagon's operation. If a new type of human being has appeared, I see it as cause for celebration. Modern men are pitiful beings that have spent most of the last two hundred thousand years killing each other. This situation, in which humans can only coexist by threatening each other with weapons of mass destruction, shows the limits of human morality. It's time we hand over the planet to the next generation of beings." [...] Rubens cursed the fragility of human peace. Why, he thought, do we have to live in constant fear of humans killing each other? This anxiety has never let up, from the time when human beings first appeared to the present, an unbroken chain of two hundred thousand long years. The sole enemy human beings have is their own species—other humans. (p.351-354)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Richard Hesse

    Genocide of One, written by Kazuaki Takano, takes you on a mental rollercoaster across three different continents. It takes you on a tour through the human psyche, biology, and genetics. While explaining only what needs to be explained, and always leaving you on the edge of your seat. As this roller coaster speeds up you almost forget where you are, and most importantly, what you are really looking for. In the west, Jonathan Yeager is picked by the United States government to be part of a top se Genocide of One, written by Kazuaki Takano, takes you on a mental rollercoaster across three different continents. It takes you on a tour through the human psyche, biology, and genetics. While explaining only what needs to be explained, and always leaving you on the edge of your seat. As this roller coaster speeds up you almost forget where you are, and most importantly, what you are really looking for. In the west, Jonathan Yeager is picked by the United States government to be part of a top secret mission with three other mercenaries. Jonathan Yeager embarks on this mission because he is scared to go home to his dying son and he needs the money to pay for his son’s medical treatment. Yeager’s son has a very uncommon disease called “pulmonary alveolar proteinosis”. Sadly, Yeager’s son is in the final stage of the disease. He only has about two months left to live. The team is told that a new virus has broken out in the Democratic Republic of Congo and that they are to go there and kill an entire village of indigenous people who live deep in the jungle. They are also told that if they see an organism that they have never seen before, they were to kill it immediately. Jonathan Yeager soon realizes that something is not quite right about the story he was told. He starts to question if he wants to keep being a pawn in this global game. At the same time in Japan, a young man, who works in the scientific field, named Kento, has to deal with the death of his father. Kento’s father passed away very recently. When he gets an automated email from his dead father, he realizes that there may have been more to his dad then the boring professor he always knew. Kento starts getting calls from a mysterious figure who calls itself “Poppy.” Poppy tells Kento to research a very uncommon disease with no cure and no relation to him called, “pulmonary alveolar proteinosis”. He also finds a paper that his dad had read called, “The Heisman Report,” which has to do with possible ways the human race could go extinct in the near future. All of this leaves Kento clueless and makes him question everything, even, who his own father was. Meanwhile, in the United States, a young, highly intelligent man named Rubens, who works for the White House, gets a mission from the president. A new chapter in human evolution has started. The Homo sapiens has evolved, and this new species has appeared in Africa. The three year old is called “Akili.” The new species is not only a threat to the US government but to the whole human species. This new species is able to understand complex concepts in their entirety, it can decode all military codes, in short, it is the new human while we are the outdated ape. Ruben’s mission is to do everything in his power to kill this new human and then everybody who has something to do with the mission. This turns into a moral dilemma for Rubens because while he realizes the threat that the three year old poses, he does not want to kill the whole village. The reason for Rubens to accept this mission is that he very rarely gets the chance to have a worthy partner to compete with intellectually. Ruben’s ego blinds him in being able to see through the smoke, and see just how powerful his enemy might be. So he sits down for a game of three-dimensional chess with this new species. These three different plot lines create multiple dimensions for this story and make it even more exciting to follow. Genocide of One, does a very good job of diving into different topics like corruption, the human psyche,biology and genetics. It explores these different categories and answers question one starts to wonder about like, “Why exactly did the homo sapien evolve from the ape”, and “Could this scenario be possible ?” It also opens your eyes to how the homo sapiens thinks and why it does so. This is one of those books that you can read and enjoy like a good game of chess. At the end, you realize that not everything is black and white and that you have to think further than the 64 shaded quadratic fields in front of you. That is the fatal mistake the humans race makes in this game of chess it forgets to look up, to see who it is playing against. Will this be the final mistake the human race ever makes?

  12. 4 out of 5

    seo eun Lee

    It was creative and really interesting. we think we are the last and most developed humans. But that's not true. We always had an evolution in our history and always will. we can be the history. in our early days, how did we reacted to the ones different from us? or smarter and stronger. we feared them. and that fear became a hatred towards them. then, that's the start of genocide.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rana

    So, here's the deal. The half of this book that was straight thriller, race against the clock to save a new human species against nefarious bad guys with weird science stuff, was pretty good. I would give that four stars. But, and this is a big but, the other half of this book that was blah blah blah about humans fighting and their propensity for war and violence? That got way super heavy-handed morally at points and holy shit, the Burns guy as president? Just fucking call him Bush, it was so in So, here's the deal. The half of this book that was straight thriller, race against the clock to save a new human species against nefarious bad guys with weird science stuff, was pretty good. I would give that four stars. But, and this is a big but, the other half of this book that was blah blah blah about humans fighting and their propensity for war and violence? That got way super heavy-handed morally at points and holy shit, the Burns guy as president? Just fucking call him Bush, it was so incredibly blatant that I almost didn't want to finish the book. The average of four stars and "didn't want to finish" is two stars.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Richard Janzen

    Kind of an odd book. Quite a long book....it was good enough that I read the whole thing. Was interested in the story, despite feeling that it could've been cut by 150 pages. Kind of an odd thing to read a political thriller which involves the US government but isn't written by a Japanese...and he jabs at Japanese history/prejudice a few times too. Had an uneasy hint of a feeling that the author might feel that he is closer to the more intelligent new species that he describes rather than the hu Kind of an odd book. Quite a long book....it was good enough that I read the whole thing. Was interested in the story, despite feeling that it could've been cut by 150 pages. Kind of an odd thing to read a political thriller which involves the US government but isn't written by a Japanese...and he jabs at Japanese history/prejudice a few times too. Had an uneasy hint of a feeling that the author might feel that he is closer to the more intelligent new species that he describes rather than the humans in the story....

  15. 4 out of 5

    ALASKANTHUNDERFLUFF

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book kept me on my toes throughout the entire read! Besides the blatant political parallels to the Bush admin, I have no complaints! That even really isn’t one. It created a sense of doubt on the true purpose of the government’s goals and what they’re capable of to make sure they are achieved. This book was packed with suspense, fear and deep sense of hope with all the bs taking place. The one thing that really stuck with me was the horrible scenes involving the African rebellion soldiers. This book kept me on my toes throughout the entire read! Besides the blatant political parallels to the Bush admin, I have no complaints! That even really isn’t one. It created a sense of doubt on the true purpose of the government’s goals and what they’re capable of to make sure they are achieved. This book was packed with suspense, fear and deep sense of hope with all the bs taking place. The one thing that really stuck with me was the horrible scenes involving the African rebellion soldiers. Oof. Just goddamn...

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I really enjoyed most of this book. It was fast-paced in my opinion, and it kept me interested throughout the book. I wish the character development was a little better but I did end up caring about each of the main characters. The only thing I did not like was the ending. Compared to the rest of the book which felt pretty detailed, the ending felt rushed and not thought out. It almost felt like it was being set up for a second book (not sure if that was the thought behind it or not). It was jus I really enjoyed most of this book. It was fast-paced in my opinion, and it kept me interested throughout the book. I wish the character development was a little better but I did end up caring about each of the main characters. The only thing I did not like was the ending. Compared to the rest of the book which felt pretty detailed, the ending felt rushed and not thought out. It almost felt like it was being set up for a second book (not sure if that was the thought behind it or not). It was just very abrupt and left me wanting more. Overall this book was still a 4/5 for me.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lanie Molinar

    This was a wonderful book! I love thrillers, and I love sci-fi, so it was perfect for me. I couldn't put it down! It's full of suspense and kept me interested all the way through. I was rooting for Yeager, Akili, and the other good people in this book until the end. If you like thrillers with plenty of suspense and a little bit of science fiction, you'll love this book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    This book starts out slow. As I read on and became more involved with the plot I really started to enjoy the science background. As the political intrigue developed I was surprised to see how appropriate the characters were to the present day. This is a novel type of science fiction, not to everyone’s taste, but I am always looking for something a bit different.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amy Hiller

    This is one of the most thought provoking novels I have ever read. Full of mystery and suspense this book makes the reader really think about what it means to be “human”. The translation to English was superb. This book does contain some highly graphic and disturbing scenes (which didn’t bother me but might be too harsh for some readers).

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bernd Richter

    Interesting read about genetic evolution of human race and what comes next. Idea has been used many times in different ways of course but here it is simply biologically driven dealing with the dilemma of one group opposing the threat to maintain status quo of society and another group supporting the next step. I liked it and gave me another perspective on evolution leapfrogging.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

    Great concept, some really solid research. Interesting how the political tone shifts as the novel unfolds, but some really"but why?" plot devices, especially the motivation for creating the drug. Writing is quite clunky; perhaps this is partly the translation, but I think it goes beyond that.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nico

    German Review on GosuReviews 3,5* Interesting SciFi-Thriller with provoking ideas, but a few problems with pacing and characters that where just too ordinary and acted just like they were supposed to. German Review on GosuReviews 3,5* Interesting SciFi-Thriller with provoking ideas, but a few problems with pacing and characters that where just too ordinary and acted just like they were supposed to.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Anstey

    A remarkable, gripping read. Tonnes of genetics and intrigue and suspense. Definitely do NOT give this to teenagers because it had vivid descriptions of shocking war crimes. Don't read this if you don't like reading violence etc.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Josh Bayliss

    One of the best books that I've read in years. Incredibly well researched, Takano breathes new life into his characters. Be warned, there are many moments that are incredibly technical (especially in the chemistry field) and if that's not for you, you might find this book drab.

  25. 4 out of 5

    bookshopgirl212

    I really liked the scientific details. It's a good thriller 3 1/2 stars if Goodreads would allow half ones :-)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    In my perspective this is a comic book without pictures. It it 50/50 fast paced and 50/50 explanation. The premise is good but not original. Many obstacles are constructed and their solutions even more so. The tension that I perceive on almost every page is just a description, and sometimes it is also explained to me -just if I didn't get it. And if I didn't get the deeper thoughts, they're there in the book: Politics, morality, ethics, culture, a mercenary's way of life, Africa, humanity, some li In my perspective this is a comic book without pictures. It it 50/50 fast paced and 50/50 explanation. The premise is good but not original. Many obstacles are constructed and their solutions even more so. The tension that I perceive on almost every page is just a description, and sometimes it is also explained to me -just if I didn't get it. And if I didn't get the deeper thoughts, they're there in the book: Politics, morality, ethics, culture, a mercenary's way of life, Africa, humanity, some light SciFi, IT hacking, chemistry, how different types of weapons work and what they do to their targets, and so on. Just read and "learn." My suspension of disbelief was crushed long before it was announced that continuous video streaming is a piece of cake, from the middle of the Kongo jungle without even a power source for the laptop. And even in the middle of a skirmish with heavy weapons. Boo! But without that gadget the story would have to take a completely different route, which the author didn't want to go. Are there any characters in the book? -There are templates with names, you learn them after a while. Some kudos although for the description of child soldiers in african wars, terrifying! But, if I 'd get asked to read it again, I'd say NO WAY!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    I forced myself to get through this, but it was definitely a slog. It's supposed to be a blend of science fiction with a high tempo thriller, but it falls short of working well as either. It feels like it was intended as a movie script rather than a novel, because the characters all fit into cliched one dimensional stereotypes, the action is overly gruesome to the point of indecency, and the science is too complex to be taken at anything other than face value. Good science fiction doesn't need t I forced myself to get through this, but it was definitely a slog. It's supposed to be a blend of science fiction with a high tempo thriller, but it falls short of working well as either. It feels like it was intended as a movie script rather than a novel, because the characters all fit into cliched one dimensional stereotypes, the action is overly gruesome to the point of indecency, and the science is too complex to be taken at anything other than face value. Good science fiction doesn't need to explain in excruciating detail how something works for readers to accept and imagine the possibilities. Good action thrillers don't need to shock with violence to keep your attention. The concept behind the novel was sound and had potential, and I don't doubt it would make a fabulous B-rated film someday, but as a novel, it fell far short of my expectations.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mengda Liu

    A somewhat realistic book that describes the potential scenarios of a better human race. The author throws in technical detail on different, which is quite interesting. The pace of the novel is also pretty fast, so I finished the book in a day. Imagining what a better race will do is by definition hard, as human knowledge should not be able to interpret it correctly.

  29. 4 out of 5

    D.M. Dutcher

    Couldn't finish this. It doesn't even work as a thriller. It has the problem a lot of Japanese SF has where it's incredibly dry and full of exposition. It doesn't really advance the plot well at all as opposed to tell the minimum of what we need to know.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Linda Smith

    There is an interesting premise and good story hidden inside this novel. What-ifs that make you wonder. Unfortunately, there was too much scientific/ medical jargon that bogged it down. I think it also suffered from translation from the Japanese. The language was very stilted.

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