counter create hit Land of the Turquoise Mountains: Journeys Across Iran - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Land of the Turquoise Mountains: Journeys Across Iran

Availability: Ready to download

For Cyrus Massoudi, a young British-born Iranian, the country his parents were forced to flee thirty years ago was a place wholly unknown to him. Wanting to make sense of his roots and piece together the divided, divisive and deeply contradictory puzzle that is contemporary Iran, he embarked on a series of journeys that spanned hundreds of miles and thousands of years. Ric For Cyrus Massoudi, a young British-born Iranian, the country his parents were forced to flee thirty years ago was a place wholly unknown to him. Wanting to make sense of his roots and piece together the divided, divisive and deeply contradictory puzzle that is contemporary Iran, he embarked on a series of journeys that spanned hundreds of miles and thousands of years. Rich portrayals of Sufis and ageing aristocrats, smugglers and underground rock bands are all woven together with history, religion and mythology to form a unique portrait of contemporary Iranian society. And, running through the heart of the narrative, lies Massoudi's poignant personal quest; his struggle echoing that of Iran itself, as it fights to forge a cohesive modern identity. Land of the Turquoise Mountains reveals a world beyond the propaganda-driven, media-fuelled image of fractious, flag-burning fundamentalism and provides a compelling glimpse both into the heart of a deeply misunderstood nation and into what it is to seek out and discover one's heritage.


Compare
Ads Banner

For Cyrus Massoudi, a young British-born Iranian, the country his parents were forced to flee thirty years ago was a place wholly unknown to him. Wanting to make sense of his roots and piece together the divided, divisive and deeply contradictory puzzle that is contemporary Iran, he embarked on a series of journeys that spanned hundreds of miles and thousands of years. Ric For Cyrus Massoudi, a young British-born Iranian, the country his parents were forced to flee thirty years ago was a place wholly unknown to him. Wanting to make sense of his roots and piece together the divided, divisive and deeply contradictory puzzle that is contemporary Iran, he embarked on a series of journeys that spanned hundreds of miles and thousands of years. Rich portrayals of Sufis and ageing aristocrats, smugglers and underground rock bands are all woven together with history, religion and mythology to form a unique portrait of contemporary Iranian society. And, running through the heart of the narrative, lies Massoudi's poignant personal quest; his struggle echoing that of Iran itself, as it fights to forge a cohesive modern identity. Land of the Turquoise Mountains reveals a world beyond the propaganda-driven, media-fuelled image of fractious, flag-burning fundamentalism and provides a compelling glimpse both into the heart of a deeply misunderstood nation and into what it is to seek out and discover one's heritage.

30 review for Land of the Turquoise Mountains: Journeys Across Iran

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Very well researched but terribly dull, I was bogged down in all the confusing history but there was no overall narrative bringing it together or pulling me along. Which is a shame as I was reading this as I travelled through Iran & was really enjoying the country. This history is incredible but endless asides about what happened with a king or empire about a place that I may or may not have visited is not very meaningful & the stories themselves are not interesting enough to stand on their own. Very well researched but terribly dull, I was bogged down in all the confusing history but there was no overall narrative bringing it together or pulling me along. Which is a shame as I was reading this as I travelled through Iran & was really enjoying the country. This history is incredible but endless asides about what happened with a king or empire about a place that I may or may not have visited is not very meaningful & the stories themselves are not interesting enough to stand on their own. There was little insight into how the country made Massoudi feel at home, he seemed to hang out with a series of wacky characters having mildly wacky adventures but then we returned to some heavy handed histories. As if he'd gone and read a lot more history to bolster up the content, neither informed the other & neither offered much in themselves.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carolinemawer

    Interspersed with the bus and taxi trips Cyrus took to see some of the tourist sights of Iran, there's lots of chunks of history in this book. Best bit: his adventure in the sea mud with the rats. But no turquoise mountains that I remember - even though there really are mountains (that used to be) loaded with turquoise in Iran. So why was that the book's title? Why didnt he go to see the remnants of the turquoise deposits? Sometimes the history chunks felt a little indigestible. Is that his writ Interspersed with the bus and taxi trips Cyrus took to see some of the tourist sights of Iran, there's lots of chunks of history in this book. Best bit: his adventure in the sea mud with the rats. But no turquoise mountains that I remember - even though there really are mountains (that used to be) loaded with turquoise in Iran. So why was that the book's title? Why didnt he go to see the remnants of the turquoise deposits? Sometimes the history chunks felt a little indigestible. Is that his writing style? Or simply reflecting how little he knew when he embarked on his journey? The history was, in my opinion, more than a little partial: his choices of Pope, Sykes, and that military sounding guy whose name I've forgotten as his go-to people to quote were surprising to me - especially when there is so much else on offer (and in the bibliography). I missed hearing exactly what Cyrus had been doing for his three years in Iran. I also missed hearing from any women - there's a lot of criticising heavy make-up (in Tehran - or as an indicator of how 'advanced' a smaller town was), or admiring stereotypically hidden eyes, but no idea of the women of Iran as individuals. Not that many of the men get a much better deal. Why does Massoudi say his Persian is rudimentary, if he lived there for three years? And I don't understand why he ends the book with a rehashing of the colonial stereotypes of the Iranian character. Iran and Iranians are multi-faceted, and can be frustrating - but the positives are much more than all the hospitality he describes.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jeruen

    Sometimes there's a travel narrative that makes you just want to book the next ticket to that destination. This book is perhaps one of those. Cyrus Massoudi is a British-born Iranian who decided to take some time travelling within Iran after his studies. I spent only 3 weeks in the country back in 2016, while the author spent 3 years. And I must say it was a wonderful experience reading his stories, as most of them overlapped with my own experiences in the brief stay I did 3 years ago. Perhaps o Sometimes there's a travel narrative that makes you just want to book the next ticket to that destination. This book is perhaps one of those. Cyrus Massoudi is a British-born Iranian who decided to take some time travelling within Iran after his studies. I spent only 3 weeks in the country back in 2016, while the author spent 3 years. And I must say it was a wonderful experience reading his stories, as most of them overlapped with my own experiences in the brief stay I did 3 years ago. Perhaps one of the things I really liked the most was the fact that the book began not with the stereotypical route that typical visitors take. Most of the first-time visitors (me included) would prioritise visiting the central cities like Kashan, Isfahan, Shiraz, and the like. This book didn't begin with that. Instead, the author first started talking about his travels in the western part of the country, which is not often visited. And because of this, I was hooked. Reading it felt like I was extending my trip from 2016, learning about the places that I didn't get to physically discover. The author first narrated about his visits to western Iran, and then to the Persian Gulf. Only later, after finishing more than half of the book, did I find the author talking about the cities that I have visited. So for the most part, the book was narrating to me places that were absolutely new, and I had nothing to anchor with my memory of places I have visited. I also liked the fact that the author did extensive research on the history of Iran. Every city he visited was narrated not only with the physical experiences he had, but also the historical background that was immediately relevant. I therefore learned quite a bit of Iranian history and culture when I was reading this book. My visit to Iran back in 2016 was perhaps the most memorable trip I have made. Iran is a country of contradictions, and it is a very fascinating destination that I definitely would love to visit again some time. As I was reading this book, I found myself gravitating back to my Iran guidebook, figuring out where to go next in the event that I find myself heading back there for a second time. Alas, there's plenty of other places I have on my short list. In the meantime I will have to be content with this book. I give it 5 out of 5 stars. See my other book reviews here.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Steve Streeter

    This is a beautiful , intelligent and fascinating read ... by the end page I find myself wanting to know more about Iran... yes, there is a lot of historical information but this is integral to the understanding and appreciation of Iran /Persia’s astounding past and how this shapes lives in many ways today. I would visually love to see this journey - the sights and people met Highly recommended

  5. 4 out of 5

    Deborah-Ruth

    This is a story of a young man who grew up British with Iranian descent who moved to Iran in his 20s to learn more about the history and the culture. It is a diary of his time and recounts many of his experiences from the puzzling to the profound. Through the cultural differences he discovers more of himself and comes to a place where he is ultimately settled in who he is.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Graham Read

    Takes it time to get going, but certainly a book that has its moments. Those interested in Iran will find some tales here to keep them interested.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Adrian

    An excellent book for anyone interested in ancient and modern Iran. It should be compulsory reading for all Western politicians to inform them about the reality of Iran and Iranians.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Anjaleen

  9. 5 out of 5

    Atoosa Ryanne

  10. 4 out of 5

    Manoo Sabety-Javid

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tangym Ali

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joy

  13. 4 out of 5

    Aleksi Jalava

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lulasola

  15. 4 out of 5

    Krithik Ranjan

  16. 5 out of 5

    Pete Baker

  17. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Lucas

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dorota Krzyżaniak

  19. 4 out of 5

    Yash Deo

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nadia Marques de Carvalho

  21. 4 out of 5

    Edna

  22. 5 out of 5

    Harish Santhanam

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alasdair

  24. 4 out of 5

    Caroline McCullagh

  25. 4 out of 5

    luddite

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Keith

  28. 5 out of 5

    Gina Moule

  29. 5 out of 5

    Grace

  30. 4 out of 5

    Serena Faithful

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.