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Horror 101: The Way Forward – a comprehensive overview of the Horror fiction genre and career opportunities available to established and aspiring authors. Have you ever wanted to be a horror writer? Perhaps you have already realized that dream and you’re looking to expand your repertoire. Writing comic books sounds nice, right? Or how about screenplays? That’s what Horror 10 Horror 101: The Way Forward – a comprehensive overview of the Horror fiction genre and career opportunities available to established and aspiring authors. Have you ever wanted to be a horror writer? Perhaps you have already realized that dream and you’re looking to expand your repertoire. Writing comic books sounds nice, right? Or how about screenplays? That’s what Horror 101: The Way Forward is all about. It’s not your average On Writing guide that covers active vs. passive and other writing tips, Horror 101 focuses on the career of a horror writer. It covers not only insights into the horror genre, but the people who successfully make a living from it. Covering aspects such as movies, comics, short stories, ghost-writing, audiobooks, editing, publishing, self-publishing, blogging, writer’s block, YA horror, reviewing, dark poetry, networking, collaborations, eBooks, podcasts, conventions, series, formatting, web serials, artwork, social media, agents, and career advice from seasoned professionals and up-and-coming talents, Horror 101 is just what you need to kick your career into high gear. Horror 101: The Way Forward is not your average On Writing guide, as it is more focused on the career options available to authors. But don’t fret, this book is loaded with career tips and behind-the-scene stories on how your favourite authors broke into their respective fields. Horror 101: The Way Forward is perfect for people who: • are suffering from writer’s block • are starting their writing careers • are looking to expand their writing repertoire • are planning on infiltrating a different field in horror writing • are looking to pay more bills with their art • are trying to further their careers • are trying to establish a name brand • are looking to get published • are planning on self-publishing • want to learn more about the pros in the horror genre • are looking for motivation and/or inspiration • love the horror genre • are not sure where to take their writing careers Includes articles by Jack Ketchum, Graham Masterton, Edward Lee, Lucy A. Snyder, Emma Audsley, RJ Cavender, Scott Nicholson, Weston Ochse, Taylor Grant, Paul Kane, Lisa Morton, Shane McKenzie, Dean M. Drinkel, Simon Marshall-Jones, Robert W. Walker, Don D’Auria, Glenn Rolfe, Harry Shannon, Chet Williamson, Lawrence Santoro, Thomas Smith, Blaze McRob, Rocky Wood, Ellen Datlow, Iain Rob Wright, Kenneth W. Cain, Daniel I. Russell, Michael McCarty, Richard Thomas, Joan De La Haye, Michael Wilson, Francois Bloemhof, C.E.L. Welsh, Jasper Bark, Niall Parkinson, Armand Rosamilia, Tonia Brown, Ramsey Campbell, Tim Waggoner, Gary McMahon, V.H. Leslie, Eric S Brown, William Meikle, John Kenny, Gary Fry, Diane Parkin, Jim Mcleod, Siobhan McKinney, Rick Carufel, Ben Eads, Theresa Derwin, Rena Mason, Steve Rasnic Tem, Michael A. Arnzen, Joe Mynhardt, John Palisano, Mark West, Steven Savile, and a writer so famous he’s required to stay anonymous.


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Horror 101: The Way Forward – a comprehensive overview of the Horror fiction genre and career opportunities available to established and aspiring authors. Have you ever wanted to be a horror writer? Perhaps you have already realized that dream and you’re looking to expand your repertoire. Writing comic books sounds nice, right? Or how about screenplays? That’s what Horror 10 Horror 101: The Way Forward – a comprehensive overview of the Horror fiction genre and career opportunities available to established and aspiring authors. Have you ever wanted to be a horror writer? Perhaps you have already realized that dream and you’re looking to expand your repertoire. Writing comic books sounds nice, right? Or how about screenplays? That’s what Horror 101: The Way Forward is all about. It’s not your average On Writing guide that covers active vs. passive and other writing tips, Horror 101 focuses on the career of a horror writer. It covers not only insights into the horror genre, but the people who successfully make a living from it. Covering aspects such as movies, comics, short stories, ghost-writing, audiobooks, editing, publishing, self-publishing, blogging, writer’s block, YA horror, reviewing, dark poetry, networking, collaborations, eBooks, podcasts, conventions, series, formatting, web serials, artwork, social media, agents, and career advice from seasoned professionals and up-and-coming talents, Horror 101 is just what you need to kick your career into high gear. Horror 101: The Way Forward is not your average On Writing guide, as it is more focused on the career options available to authors. But don’t fret, this book is loaded with career tips and behind-the-scene stories on how your favourite authors broke into their respective fields. Horror 101: The Way Forward is perfect for people who: • are suffering from writer’s block • are starting their writing careers • are looking to expand their writing repertoire • are planning on infiltrating a different field in horror writing • are looking to pay more bills with their art • are trying to further their careers • are trying to establish a name brand • are looking to get published • are planning on self-publishing • want to learn more about the pros in the horror genre • are looking for motivation and/or inspiration • love the horror genre • are not sure where to take their writing careers Includes articles by Jack Ketchum, Graham Masterton, Edward Lee, Lucy A. Snyder, Emma Audsley, RJ Cavender, Scott Nicholson, Weston Ochse, Taylor Grant, Paul Kane, Lisa Morton, Shane McKenzie, Dean M. Drinkel, Simon Marshall-Jones, Robert W. Walker, Don D’Auria, Glenn Rolfe, Harry Shannon, Chet Williamson, Lawrence Santoro, Thomas Smith, Blaze McRob, Rocky Wood, Ellen Datlow, Iain Rob Wright, Kenneth W. Cain, Daniel I. Russell, Michael McCarty, Richard Thomas, Joan De La Haye, Michael Wilson, Francois Bloemhof, C.E.L. Welsh, Jasper Bark, Niall Parkinson, Armand Rosamilia, Tonia Brown, Ramsey Campbell, Tim Waggoner, Gary McMahon, V.H. Leslie, Eric S Brown, William Meikle, John Kenny, Gary Fry, Diane Parkin, Jim Mcleod, Siobhan McKinney, Rick Carufel, Ben Eads, Theresa Derwin, Rena Mason, Steve Rasnic Tem, Michael A. Arnzen, Joe Mynhardt, John Palisano, Mark West, Steven Savile, and a writer so famous he’s required to stay anonymous.

30 review for Horror 101: The Way Forward

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paula Cappa

    In the realm of American literature, the horror genre has traditionally had a second place ranking, so I was pleased to see Horror 101: The Way Forward, because it’s an ambitious attempt to direct horror writers to focus on and develop high standards for storytelling. This is a 400-page journey about horror writing, horror writers, and the business of horror genre. I especially like how Graham Masterton advises writers to “be there” on the page and “take your characters by the hand so that you c In the realm of American literature, the horror genre has traditionally had a second place ranking, so I was pleased to see Horror 101: The Way Forward, because it’s an ambitious attempt to direct horror writers to focus on and develop high standards for storytelling. This is a 400-page journey about horror writing, horror writers, and the business of horror genre. I especially like how Graham Masterton advises writers to “be there” on the page and “take your characters by the hand so that you can physically feel them.” I wished he wrote more on character building. Ramsey Campbell’s “Avoiding What’s Been Done to Death” is a chapter every new writer needs to read. His point about how he avoids “plotting or constructing too far ahead” in his novels honors the creative process: he says “let the novel develop itself as it takes on more life.” If you know Campbell’s work, you can appreciate this chestnut of wisdom. Richard Thomas gives us a peek into the life of one of his rejected short stories (“Rudy Jenkins”) and, wow, was I impressed—proving that talent requires not only believing in your craft but also persistence. Larry Santoro’s “Writing Aloud” is a refreshing chapter on how a writer can explore written sounds, the music of the story, and "hear" the story as the reader would (don’t miss his paragraph on “triangulation” of the senses). I do have to take issue (forgive me) with Jim McLeod’s “Reviewing,” where he says “reviewers that will take payment for writing a review are not reviewers, they are scum and do more damage than good.” This is not a fair assessment. Free book reviewers aren’t any less biased or free of scum just because they write book reviews for free. Book reviewing is a messy business and there are scum on both sides. I like the subtitle The Way Forward because as a writer and reader of horror, I like to see this genre soar with literary quality. One more thing, the front and back of the text have pages of inspirational authors’ quotations that are like comforting little bookends. Here’s one of them from a non-horror writer: “Logic will get you from A to B, imagination will take you everywhere.” Einstein. Every writer needs that one.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gregor Xane

    If you can get it on a freebie day, you'll be glad someone collected and compiled these blog posts from various websites for you. You'll find some helpful nuggets mixed in with some thinly-veiled fits of self-promotion. The verdict? Not worthless!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jack

    There are a lot of essays in this book, and they cover a wide range of topics. A lot of writing books deal with craft or what I would call creative inspiration. They give you technical skills to be a cleaner writer, or they encourage you to sit down and be creative. This books spends just as much time on the other aspects of being a writer that are less talked about. It addresses networking, ghostwriting, rejection, marketing, and a number of other issues that are the sort of dirty little secret There are a lot of essays in this book, and they cover a wide range of topics. A lot of writing books deal with craft or what I would call creative inspiration. They give you technical skills to be a cleaner writer, or they encourage you to sit down and be creative. This books spends just as much time on the other aspects of being a writer that are less talked about. It addresses networking, ghostwriting, rejection, marketing, and a number of other issues that are the sort of dirty little secrets of the business. If you have any notions of the writer as a solitary artist writing his labor of love, this book will shed them. It's outlook is more realistic than a lot of writing books I've read. I enjoyed it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Monique Snyman

    What can I say that’s not been said in the synopsis of Horror 101: The Way Forward? Well, it’s freaking insightful I’ll tell you that much, although I think that’s already been implied. To be honest, I haven’t reviewed anything like it until now, but let me tell you that it’s the type of book that every author should get their hands on. If you’re in the business of writing horror you probably shouldn’t overlook Horror 101: The Way Forward, especially seeing as it’s a vital reference guide to the What can I say that’s not been said in the synopsis of Horror 101: The Way Forward? Well, it’s freaking insightful I’ll tell you that much, although I think that’s already been implied. To be honest, I haven’t reviewed anything like it until now, but let me tell you that it’s the type of book that every author should get their hands on. If you’re in the business of writing horror you probably shouldn’t overlook Horror 101: The Way Forward, especially seeing as it’s a vital reference guide to the writing world we all think we know. Filled with essays that cover all the topics we usually discuss with one another in writing groups, which doesn’t seem to stay on topic half the time, Horror 101: The Way Forward will become a bible for any wordsmith trying to break into the world of horror. But don’t let the genre fool you! Yes, this book is ultimately marketed towards horror writers, but every writer should get their hands on it. These essays will answer all your questions. From getting a firm grip of the usual “how to’s” to the “what now’s” – and everything in between – you’ll be able to become a pro in the genre in no time. The essays are well written, insightful (I said that already, didn’t I?) and will assist you in honing your skills as an author. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re aspiring to become an author or if you’ve been in the business for ages, Horror 101: The Way Forward is going to be an incredible help. So in short, yes, this is definitely a must-read. (review originally posted on www.tentaclebooks.com)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Petry

    Originally I was a bit skeptical of this because the cover seemed a little too cheesy to me but once I started skipping around and reading some of the essays I was delighted with what I found. Writing advice and essays for horror writers that span many different levels from, writer's block and inspiration/advice, to the pro's and con's of self publishing, to how to make the most of social media. This is about not just how to write but also how to be a working writer. Lot's of information that I Originally I was a bit skeptical of this because the cover seemed a little too cheesy to me but once I started skipping around and reading some of the essays I was delighted with what I found. Writing advice and essays for horror writers that span many different levels from, writer's block and inspiration/advice, to the pro's and con's of self publishing, to how to make the most of social media. This is about not just how to write but also how to be a working writer. Lot's of information that I suspect the would be writer needs to know but only learns through experience. Offer's views not only how best to sell your stories but also how to sell yourself. I found some essays more helpful or relevant to me than others but almost all of them were interesting. In that way I enjoyed it and found it as useful as Scratch: Writers, Money, and the Art of Making a Living just much more specialized and with a different view point. This book is, for the right writer, a great resource and well worth checking out. I will check out other titles from Crystal Lake no matter what I think of the covers. And now that I think about it I take back what I said about this cover, it's growing on me.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Lucia

    Lot of great essay here from leaders in the genre - Ellen Datlow, Jack Ketchum, Ramsey Campbell, Graham Masterson, Ed Lee - and there's something for everyone. No new secrets, but timely and broad. And for this price, a steal.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Wednesday Friday

    This is a strong collection of essays by writers that horror fans have surely read, and some they may not have. They offer advice and stories from their own experience on a diverse range of topics related to working in horror fiction. These include ways to brand yourself and develop a following, and novel-adjacent gigs like editing, short stories, screenwriting, graphic novels, and more. Some of the stuff was not specific to my situation, but was still enjoyable to read thanks to the wit and ent This is a strong collection of essays by writers that horror fans have surely read, and some they may not have. They offer advice and stories from their own experience on a diverse range of topics related to working in horror fiction. These include ways to brand yourself and develop a following, and novel-adjacent gigs like editing, short stories, screenwriting, graphic novels, and more. Some of the stuff was not specific to my situation, but was still enjoyable to read thanks to the wit and enthusiasm of the contributors. I got this one for only 99 cents, which is a steal. Anyone who is, or wants to be working with horror lit should pick this one up.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Spyder Collins

    Great tales of inspiration and style, all worth the cost of admission, all expertly presented. Learn what drives the genres best and what their inspirations are. This is for sure a virtual classroom. This is a once in a lifetime training tool that is simply amazing.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Duncan Ralston

    Lots of great advice from established and new writers and publishers. I'm likely to be reading this many times.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Alexander

    This is a chatty and light introduction to the horror storytelling business. Horror 101 offers a stack of short, brisk cuts into different parts of the horror corpus, from marketing to networking, illustration to editing to agents to inspiration. The emphasis is on writing, although there are bits on new media and art. There's a lot of useful advice for people wanting to crack into the field, but none of it is very deep. The book won't carry you far in writing, for example, although it might help This is a chatty and light introduction to the horror storytelling business. Horror 101 offers a stack of short, brisk cuts into different parts of the horror corpus, from marketing to networking, illustration to editing to agents to inspiration. The emphasis is on writing, although there are bits on new media and art. There's a lot of useful advice for people wanting to crack into the field, but none of it is very deep. The book won't carry you far in writing, for example, although it might help you start and remind you to write more novels (or stories; authors disagree). There's a sketch of the market, but just a sketch. Being an anthology, the contents are uneven. I found some worth at best a skim, then paid careful attention to others. The horror field as genre isn't really on display here. Some writers share a few recommended readings (when not commending themselves to your eager attention), and that's about it. You won't find a literacy analysis of how to shape a scary narrative. Personally, this was much less useful than I'd anticipated. That's because of my background: lifelong horror reader and fan, PhD dissertation in Gothic horror, scholarship and teaching on Gothic, etc. Audience: this is only for people considering the conception of new horror stories. 3 stars for them.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mark Lewis

    There is lot of really great advice in here. Not too mention, quite a bit of humor.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cory Cline

    As another wannabe horror writer who always appreciates advice from the pros, Crystal Lake Publishing's Horror 101:The Way Forward was hard to resist. Joe Mynhardt has collected a slew of invaluable advice from some of the biggest names in horror as well as some of the new blood that is surely on their way to becoming well respected horror authors. I am old enough to be of the classic On Writing Horror school, so much of the advice in here is simply hammered home again, but with updated views and As another wannabe horror writer who always appreciates advice from the pros, Crystal Lake Publishing's Horror 101:The Way Forward was hard to resist. Joe Mynhardt has collected a slew of invaluable advice from some of the biggest names in horror as well as some of the new blood that is surely on their way to becoming well respected horror authors. I am old enough to be of the classic On Writing Horror school, so much of the advice in here is simply hammered home again, but with updated views and fresh voices. Jack Ketchum, Graham Masterson, and Edward Lee begin the parade of great advice with their own beliefs on the horror genre. Ramsey Campbell gives some great advice on avoiding whats been done before, Steve Rasnic Tem gives a dozen solid tips on making a career, and Rocky Wood invites us to the Horror Writers Association. These well respected, and well known authors give solid advice that is fresh to hear again in their respective voices. Writing has changed so much since the above mentioned classic that there needed to be something new to answer questions by writers, like me, who are realizing how vital the digital age is to a successful writing career. I am one of those writers who has no problem getting through a draft or two, but I get to the editing part and... oh look a butterfly is dancing around the garden outside my window... I can address my problems as a writer, but I am still fairly new to Facebook and the digital age. After years of telling myself how ridiculous Facebook and Twitter is, I have come to realize how vital it can be if used correctly. Many of the newer authors in this book have been active in the digital age for some time and I have picked up vital advice from authors I was somewhat familiar with, like Shane McKenzie, Michael Arnzen, Lucy Snyder,Tim Waggoner, and Scott Nicholson. I was also more than pleasantly surprised by the advice from authors like Jasper Bark, Weston Ochse, Blaze McRob, and a few others whose writing was so good for this anthology of advice, that I will surely be looking forward to reading more from them and have already added many of them to my mental list of authors to check out. As a struggling wannabe writer, I have to applaud and thank Joe Mynhardt, not only for his great advice within the pages of his anthology, but for taking the time to put this book together. The time he must have spent talking to these authors, putting it all together, and editing it must have been exhausting and I'm sure he cussed himself out for beginning such a detailed and extensive project. At the end, he has created a classic that any writer, not just us horror junkies, can call upon for advice and inspiration. Thanks Joe!

  13. 4 out of 5

    John W. Dennehy

    An excellent book for almost anyone in the business. A fast pace, well worth the price and time to read it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Luke Walker

    Anyone writing horror has to read this book. Without sounding OTT, I found it invaluable.

  15. 4 out of 5

    John

    The information here is very basic, yet the scope of this book is vast enough that I had no trouble finding several topics on which I am a complete ignoramus (namely, anything involving online marketing, social networking, or using my computer for something other than YouTube or Microsoft Word.) Also, on an unrelated note, my spell checker just informed me that I'm an ignoramus at spelling ignoramus... HORROR 101 is a great place to start if you're a writing novice looking to get some quick tips The information here is very basic, yet the scope of this book is vast enough that I had no trouble finding several topics on which I am a complete ignoramus (namely, anything involving online marketing, social networking, or using my computer for something other than YouTube or Microsoft Word.) Also, on an unrelated note, my spell checker just informed me that I'm an ignoramus at spelling ignoramus... HORROR 101 is a great place to start if you're a writing novice looking to get some quick tips from established veterans who know the business in and out. And don't be put off simply because you might not be a fan of the horror genre. 96% of the information in this book is useful for writers of any stripe. There are tons of writing tips, tons of editing and publishing tips, articles on the business/promotional aspects of writing, articles on writing quality horror, and articles just meant to give you a good 'ol fashioned pep talk. At only $0.99 for a Kindle download, the word "bargain" doesn't even begin to describe it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Donald Armfield

    Although I'm still in process of reading this book. I will be using this for inspiration & research to write my horror novel. I'm currently brainstorming my ideas. This book will help bring out my horror. This anthology is packed with useful information, and inspiring words from bestselling authors & others in the horror industry. I skimmed through most of the book today @ work and am very pleased to own a copy of this 101 lesson in horror. I am front and center for this class, wait until you rea Although I'm still in process of reading this book. I will be using this for inspiration & research to write my horror novel. I'm currently brainstorming my ideas. This book will help bring out my horror. This anthology is packed with useful information, and inspiring words from bestselling authors & others in the horror industry. I skimmed through most of the book today @ work and am very pleased to own a copy of this 101 lesson in horror. I am front and center for this class, wait until you read my novel. Big thanks to Kevin Lucia for a copy of this book. I will update status and lessons I use from this book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Richard Barber

    this is a fantastic read for anyone interested in writing horror fiction. a great range of articles from did of the best names in the field.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Russell Holbrook

    I really like this book. This was the second time I've read it. I'll probably read it once a year. My favorite essay was "The Cheesy Trunk of Terror" by Scott Nicholson. Very inspiring!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Castagna

    I remember ordering Writer's Digest books once or twice, I still own them, all but the Writer's Market itself is still a valuable addition to any library whether you are a writer or not. This compendium was just like one of those books. The essays were written by horror writers both classic, and new to the scene. They covered a variety of topics, including, agents, self-publishing, publicity, and the actual craft of writing horror. It is a packed book of priceless facts, anecdotes, advice, and s I remember ordering Writer's Digest books once or twice, I still own them, all but the Writer's Market itself is still a valuable addition to any library whether you are a writer or not. This compendium was just like one of those books. The essays were written by horror writers both classic, and new to the scene. They covered a variety of topics, including, agents, self-publishing, publicity, and the actual craft of writing horror. It is a packed book of priceless facts, anecdotes, advice, and strategies. I wholeheartedly recommend this to any lover of the genre, or aspiring writer.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kyla Ward

    Dipping into this collection of essays on the craft, practicalities and options of horror writing can hardly but turn up something immediately useful. Short, pithy and varied is the order of the day. Particular favourites were "The Year After Publication" by Rena Mason, "Writing Horror: 12 Tips on Making a Career of It" by Steve Rasnic Tem, and Jim McLeod's guide to submitting your work to reviewers.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kaye Booth

    Horror 101: The Way Forward is based on the sound advice of seasoned professionals that is useful to horror writers in any stage of their careers. I recommend it for anyone who wants to write horror in either fiction or screenwriting. Read my full, very long review on my blog: https://kayelynnebooth.wordpress.com/... Horror 101: The Way Forward is based on the sound advice of seasoned professionals that is useful to horror writers in any stage of their careers. I recommend it for anyone who wants to write horror in either fiction or screenwriting. Read my full, very long review on my blog: https://kayelynnebooth.wordpress.com/...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Drago

    This collection is a must-have for any horror fan/writer. The essays cover the basics - everything from how to deal with writer's block to expert advice on self-publishing. Some of the best-known writers in the field are represented, including Jack Ketchum and Ramsey Campbell. Well-worth the investment and much-deserving of its Bram Stoker Nomination.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tonia Harris

    This is a fantastic resource for any writer, but a virtual goldmine for horror writers/aficionados. It features essays from Indie writers, editors, screenplay writers, and more. They share their knowledge on everything from tips for newbie writers to discourse on today's modern publishing marketplace and the infinite possibilities available.

  24. 4 out of 5

    A.R.

    For the most part, this tome is filled with good ideas by industry professionals on how to make it as a horror author. Personally, I do it because I enjoy it, not for the money. But it would be nice to make a decent wage at it--or is that a delusion of grandeur?

  25. 5 out of 5

    Miss Chinaski

    If you're just starting out as a horror writer, I highly recommend you buy this book, which will help you avoid many pitfalls on your way forward.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Devin Anderson

    Great advice for the novice and established author alike. Have a highlighter and/or pen ready while reading this little gem, there's plenty to save for later reference.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Lots of great inspiration and advice.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Louisa Heaton

    Really great book, with lots of informative essays from established authors and specialists in the horror genre.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Nowak

    Writing is a tough gig in many respects. It can take a year or more to bring your work to the point where people can see it. There are times of horrifying depression and moments of incredible highs. However, there is nothing I would rather do than to write novels for my small but growing fan base. So, when a book comes along to help me out with tips and thoughts on the subject of writing in my genera, I tend to listen up. Enter “Horror 101: The Way Forward”, by Crystal Lake Publishing. Hearing ad Writing is a tough gig in many respects. It can take a year or more to bring your work to the point where people can see it. There are times of horrifying depression and moments of incredible highs. However, there is nothing I would rather do than to write novels for my small but growing fan base. So, when a book comes along to help me out with tips and thoughts on the subject of writing in my genera, I tend to listen up. Enter “Horror 101: The Way Forward”, by Crystal Lake Publishing. Hearing advice from the experts not only confirms that I am on the right track, but also that I am likely being too hard on myself when I want nothing more than to be a great author right then and there. Truth be known, it can take ten or more years to become a commercial success and this book does a good job reminding the reader of that. Well written by professionals in the business and expertly edited by Joe Mynhardt and Emma Audsley, these bits of advice and tales range from the silly to the serious. This is a wonderful aspect of this book as it will bring a smile to your face and is not so heavy you will feel like it is constantly pulling you down. For anyone who is going to be writing in the Horror/Thriller/Suspense genera, I would highly recommend reading this book. In addition to practical advice, it will keep you well grounded in reality and give you the spiritual fortitude you need to just keep writing.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Fredösphere

    Another for the life-is-too-short file. This collection of writing advice from a variety of successful authors is simply too high-level and too focused on personal anecdotes to interest me.

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