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Sex, Brains, & Video Games: A Librarian's Guide to Teens in the Twenty-first Century

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Library services to young adults should aspire to two fundamental objectives: to engage young people through meaningful and appealing responses to their recreational and informational needs, while supporting good developmental outcomes. How are those of us who work in libraries, who may see teens only sporadically and for short periods, supposed to work effectively with th Library services to young adults should aspire to two fundamental objectives: to engage young people through meaningful and appealing responses to their recreational and informational needs, while supporting good developmental outcomes. How are those of us who work in libraries, who may see teens only sporadically and for short periods, supposed to work effectively with them? --From the Introduction How do we best reach our teen patrons? Young adult librarians and others who serve them constantly strive to better understand this often-unpredictable audience. In this insightful guide, Jennifer Burek Pierce provides a fascinating look at today s teen through the lens of neurological, psychological and educational research. Putting this research in the context of library services, she challenges librarians to question their assumptions about teen patrons and provide new answers based on research finding. Much like early literacy research informed library services to youngest patrons, this provocative book outlines what others who work with adolescents have learned from their professional activities and how that knowledge can encourage new priorities and partnerships in youth services. Use this research to: · Help sort out the facts from fiction about adolescent brain development and sexuality · Equip staff to understand and sensitively interact with teens · Foster understanding about teens, technology, and multitasking · Incorporate teen friendly services and activities into the library


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Library services to young adults should aspire to two fundamental objectives: to engage young people through meaningful and appealing responses to their recreational and informational needs, while supporting good developmental outcomes. How are those of us who work in libraries, who may see teens only sporadically and for short periods, supposed to work effectively with th Library services to young adults should aspire to two fundamental objectives: to engage young people through meaningful and appealing responses to their recreational and informational needs, while supporting good developmental outcomes. How are those of us who work in libraries, who may see teens only sporadically and for short periods, supposed to work effectively with them? --From the Introduction How do we best reach our teen patrons? Young adult librarians and others who serve them constantly strive to better understand this often-unpredictable audience. In this insightful guide, Jennifer Burek Pierce provides a fascinating look at today s teen through the lens of neurological, psychological and educational research. Putting this research in the context of library services, she challenges librarians to question their assumptions about teen patrons and provide new answers based on research finding. Much like early literacy research informed library services to youngest patrons, this provocative book outlines what others who work with adolescents have learned from their professional activities and how that knowledge can encourage new priorities and partnerships in youth services. Use this research to: · Help sort out the facts from fiction about adolescent brain development and sexuality · Equip staff to understand and sensitively interact with teens · Foster understanding about teens, technology, and multitasking · Incorporate teen friendly services and activities into the library

30 review for Sex, Brains, & Video Games: A Librarian's Guide to Teens in the Twenty-first Century

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brandy

    If I had to guess, I'd say this book is aimed at librarians who don't regularly work with teenagers. it starts from a basic premise of "hey! Teens aren't really space aliens!", which is great, but then it contradicts it by talking about how young teens are just so radically different from adult librarians for so many reasons (because they grew up with different technology, because they have different brain chemistry, because they're at a different stage in their lives, etc). I skipped over a lot If I had to guess, I'd say this book is aimed at librarians who don't regularly work with teenagers. it starts from a basic premise of "hey! Teens aren't really space aliens!", which is great, but then it contradicts it by talking about how young teens are just so radically different from adult librarians for so many reasons (because they grew up with different technology, because they have different brain chemistry, because they're at a different stage in their lives, etc). I skipped over a lot of the chapter on teen brain development (it's nothing new; just a rehash of all the research done to date) but a lot of what's here seems either obvious (teens play video games! teens may be prone to risky behavior!) or inaccurate (parents should avoid buying their teens violent first-person-shooter games, sometimes called "role playing games," which, no, not really). Those who can, do. This author teaches classes in children's and teen resources at the U of Iowa's library school. Her pop-culture references are out-of-date (Weetzie Bat, anyone?) and one gets the impression she hasn't actually interacted with real teens in at least ten years. If you've met a teenager--any teenager--within the last decade, you probably don't need to spend the time reading this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This took me forever to finish. Mostly, it was a research review of teen development and behavior, which you would have already learned about if you have taken a child development course. I was hoping for connections from teen research to practical library applications, but that's not what this book is about. It was pretty dry and some sentences were so jargony and awkward it took reading them 4-5 times before they made sense. But, for librarians who haven't studied teen development in the last This took me forever to finish. Mostly, it was a research review of teen development and behavior, which you would have already learned about if you have taken a child development course. I was hoping for connections from teen research to practical library applications, but that's not what this book is about. It was pretty dry and some sentences were so jargony and awkward it took reading them 4-5 times before they made sense. But, for librarians who haven't studied teen development in the last 10+ years, it could be helpful. A quote from Aidan Chambers inspired this excellent excerpt that I plan to use next time I hear one of my colleagues worrying that 'these teens just don't read' or 'I don't know about this generation, they're on their cell phones all the time': "There is no such thing as an adolescent. It is a state in life. They are as diverse as we are." These ideas challenge librarians to consider the adolescent as an individual rather than a member of a cohort with particular characteristics. It suggests that for every video-game-playing teen there is a quiet reader, or even that the gamer may want reading material that might seem to be at odds with his or her screen-involved persona. Instead of thinking of youth appeal in reductive terms in order to make easy connections between resources and young people, Chambers presents the need to consider each young person as an individual.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Beaver

    Understanding teens is vital to providing the library services they need; however, library research rarely seeks to understand its patrons. In this book, Jennifer Burek Pierce gathers research about adolescent development, psychology, and education from other disciplines and presents it in terms relevant to librarians, who work with teens, but don’t necessarily interact with them on a daily basis. It covers topics such as brain development, myths and realities about teen behavior and interests, Understanding teens is vital to providing the library services they need; however, library research rarely seeks to understand its patrons. In this book, Jennifer Burek Pierce gathers research about adolescent development, psychology, and education from other disciplines and presents it in terms relevant to librarians, who work with teens, but don’t necessarily interact with them on a daily basis. It covers topics such as brain development, myths and realities about teen behavior and interests, diversity, sex, and technology. Each chapter includes an excerpt or interview from an outside source, well versed in the topic and an annotated list of suggested readings, in addition to the references. Easy to read and extremely informative, it is a perfect introductory guide for librarians who work with teens (and even those who don’t).

  4. 5 out of 5

    Cassie

    I have to read this book for my Children and Young Adult programming class. I was really disappointed in the content, or lack of content, in this book. It really is about sex, brains, and video games for young adults. As a librarian, I know that I should understand the differences between teen brains, etc, but really? I need to know this much? I guess I wanted this book to take the information offered and I wanted to see it translated into real library world examples that I could use in offering I have to read this book for my Children and Young Adult programming class. I was really disappointed in the content, or lack of content, in this book. It really is about sex, brains, and video games for young adults. As a librarian, I know that I should understand the differences between teen brains, etc, but really? I need to know this much? I guess I wanted this book to take the information offered and I wanted to see it translated into real library world examples that I could use in offering programming for teens.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    This is a textbook from my YA literature course. It contains a lot of great information about teens' preferred styles. It is a bit too technical for me -- very heavy in statistics -- but done so in a reasonable fashion. This is a textbook from my YA literature course. It contains a lot of great information about teens' preferred styles. It is a bit too technical for me -- very heavy in statistics -- but done so in a reasonable fashion.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chris Johnson

    I have to say that overall, this was a great book that really gets inside a teenager's head...what goes on, what do we as librarians need to consider, but the one major drawback of this book is that its a tad technical...otherwise, its very interesting.... I have to say that overall, this was a great book that really gets inside a teenager's head...what goes on, what do we as librarians need to consider, but the one major drawback of this book is that its a tad technical...otherwise, its very interesting....

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Good information, but very repetitive.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kricket

    this is kind of a perpetual read that i snatch a few pages of here and there. so i'm not actually done, i just got tired of seeing it on my currently-reading list. this is kind of a perpetual read that i snatch a few pages of here and there. so i'm not actually done, i just got tired of seeing it on my currently-reading list.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

  10. 4 out of 5

    Billy

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brenna Call

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Clark

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

  15. 4 out of 5

    Agen Eddy

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marissa

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kim

  19. 5 out of 5

    Becca Rutkowski

  20. 5 out of 5

    Francesco Mazzetta

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stacie

  26. 5 out of 5

    Erika

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kadir

  29. 5 out of 5

    Donna Hoffner

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jillian

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