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In Islam Plain and Simple, author Tariq Jalil explores the basic beliefs of Islam as well as its most controversial topics. In this highly accessible introduction, Mr. Jalil expounds upon the basis of Muslim ethics and spirituality practiced by over 1.6 billion people. With an eye toward common misconceptions held by observers in the West, and to the sometimes troubling in In Islam Plain and Simple, author Tariq Jalil explores the basic beliefs of Islam as well as its most controversial topics. In this highly accessible introduction, Mr. Jalil expounds upon the basis of Muslim ethics and spirituality practiced by over 1.6 billion people. With an eye toward common misconceptions held by observers in the West, and to the sometimes troubling inheritance in Muslim countries, he has woven together a well-researched narrative that challenges both stereotypes and even some practices in the Muslim world itself. Mr. Jalil's perspective and depth of understanding is invaluable for enhancing understanding and providing a dialogue for many years to come.


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In Islam Plain and Simple, author Tariq Jalil explores the basic beliefs of Islam as well as its most controversial topics. In this highly accessible introduction, Mr. Jalil expounds upon the basis of Muslim ethics and spirituality practiced by over 1.6 billion people. With an eye toward common misconceptions held by observers in the West, and to the sometimes troubling in In Islam Plain and Simple, author Tariq Jalil explores the basic beliefs of Islam as well as its most controversial topics. In this highly accessible introduction, Mr. Jalil expounds upon the basis of Muslim ethics and spirituality practiced by over 1.6 billion people. With an eye toward common misconceptions held by observers in the West, and to the sometimes troubling inheritance in Muslim countries, he has woven together a well-researched narrative that challenges both stereotypes and even some practices in the Muslim world itself. Mr. Jalil's perspective and depth of understanding is invaluable for enhancing understanding and providing a dialogue for many years to come.

30 review for Islam Plain and Simple

  1. 4 out of 5

    1shinyobject

    If you are looking for an exhaustive and thorough study of the Islamic faith and its practitioners – this is not that book. Instead, “Islam: Plain and Simple” is a straightforward introduction to the world’s second largest religion. Yet, despite the heavy subject matter this is a thoroughly enjoyable read, particularly for those wishing to add a basic body of knowledge without being overwhelmed with theology and nuance. According to the author, Tariq Jalil, he was born and raised in the Muslim f If you are looking for an exhaustive and thorough study of the Islamic faith and its practitioners – this is not that book. Instead, “Islam: Plain and Simple” is a straightforward introduction to the world’s second largest religion. Yet, despite the heavy subject matter this is a thoroughly enjoyable read, particularly for those wishing to add a basic body of knowledge without being overwhelmed with theology and nuance. According to the author, Tariq Jalil, he was born and raised in the Muslim faith in Columbus, Ohio. This places him in a unique position to offer insight into one of this country’s most divisive and least understood topics. As the subtitle suggests, the book sheds light on controversial issues (women, terrorism, polygamy, et cetera) – quite successfully. Much of the credit goes to the author’s willingness to acknowledge when the teachings of the Quran either diverge from Western-ecclesiastical thinking (veils, Jesus, bacon!) or when the teachings have been intentionally misinterpreted to justify a particular behavior (suicide, sharia law). I found this honesty refreshing. Additionally, the points are well researched and thorough but presented in a way that is accessible to the casual reader. At the very least the book is a de-mystifying of the religion but it could be much more than that – I believe it provides a solid foundation to jumpstart real, honest and productive discourse.

  2. 4 out of 5

    The Elves

    We got this book in a Goodreads First Reads contest. Even though we have an undergraduate degree in Philosophy and Religion, we realized we actually knew very little about Islam and its tenets, which seemed rather negligent of us in this modern world where Islam and its adherents have become such a prominent part of our lives. Islam: Plain and Simple by Tariq Jalil is the perfect book for those of us who desire a basic understanding of this faith that is embraced by so many in the world. It expla We got this book in a Goodreads First Reads contest. Even though we have an undergraduate degree in Philosophy and Religion, we realized we actually knew very little about Islam and its tenets, which seemed rather negligent of us in this modern world where Islam and its adherents have become such a prominent part of our lives. Islam: Plain and Simple by Tariq Jalil is the perfect book for those of us who desire a basic understanding of this faith that is embraced by so many in the world. It explains in clear language what Islam is, what it isn’t, and the ways in which it is commonly misinterpreted both by Muslims and non-Muslims and how, like so many religions, Islam has been reinterpreted to fit the cultural prejudices of the particular ethnic groups that have embraced it. It also gives a simply summary of the life of its Prophet giving historical background to the development of this faith through his example. If you, like us, feel ignorant about what Islam really espouses, this is the perfect book to enlighten you on the subject. The Silver Elves authors of The Elven Way: The Magical Path of the Shining Ones

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chuck

    I highly recommend this book. It answers many of the questions people ask about Islam and beliefs on both a religious and social level. It also puts Islam in a historical perspective by devoting one chapter to the life of the prophet, Muhammad.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lucinda

    An interesting look at a religion that I don't know much about - always happy to learn new things :) An interesting look at a religion that I don't know much about - always happy to learn new things :)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Seán

    Disclaimer: I won this book through a Goodreads Giveaway. I found the book to be well written, accessible, and was overall a decent, albeit very basic, introduction to Islam. However, being someone who holds a BA in Religious Studies and a Master of Divinity—during which I spent numerous years studying Islam in depth—I felt the book fell flat in a few areas. Two features of the book stood out to me which I feel warrant commenting on: First, the authors favorite word throughout the book is "should" Disclaimer: I won this book through a Goodreads Giveaway. I found the book to be well written, accessible, and was overall a decent, albeit very basic, introduction to Islam. However, being someone who holds a BA in Religious Studies and a Master of Divinity—during which I spent numerous years studying Islam in depth—I felt the book fell flat in a few areas. Two features of the book stood out to me which I feel warrant commenting on: First, the authors favorite word throughout the book is "should", which seemed to be used on nearly every page related to Islamic practices (ie: some people have done this practice, but they should do this other practice instead"). The author was very concerned about the context of passages, particularly as they dealt with practices, but was silent on how his understanding of passages was at least in part shaped by his current cultural context. Because of this, the use of should was not surprising to me, as the authors perspective seems to be informed, at least in some way, by Islamic reformers such as Jamal al-Din al-Afghani and Muhammad Abduh, as well as popular Western thought concerning Islam which views some Islamic practices (be they current or historical) negatively. This being said, it was interesting that the qualification of practices with "should" was even used at all, as the author went to some length to argue that differing perspectives and practices within Islam are welcomed—even going so far as to say "authoritarian or fundamentalist versions of Islam are a contradiction in terms" (p.18). If this were true, does one even have the ability to speak of what all Muslims should do with any amount of authority? Perhaps in some instances, but in was unclear which instances would allow for any such absolute pronouncement. It would have been more helpful if the author had actively acknowledged different practices between groups (particularly Shia and Sunni, which were barely mentioned let alone discussed) and perhaps even the contextual differences between Islamic practices in various part of the world, rather than making blanket statements concerning practices qualified with "should" which seemingly ignored modern context completely (particularly the context of the author himself). Such statements made much of the book feel more like an apology for past (and ongoing?) practices from someone who is quite far removed from them —be it by time, distance, culture, or all three. Second, the author does not do an effective job in interacting with texts and traditions other than Islam and the Quran. The Quranic references were quite numerous and helpful, as were many of the historical notes. However, the biblical references, as well as references to Christian and Jewish theology and history, were unintentionally erroneous at best and incompetent at worst. I found myself double checking notes and writing corrections in the margins nearly every time Christianity and Judaism were mentioned, and found numerous mistakes and misunderstanding (especially theological and historical). If, as the author concludes, Muslims and non-Muslims are to dialogue together and understand each others positions, we must learn to approach each others traditions with the same care that we would approach our own with—something which, disappointingly, I did not feel the author did in this book. Both these things being said, I did find myself circling and underling passages throughout the book which, as a non-Muslim, I whole-heartedly agreed with. Indeed, the author is correct in concluding that there is a vast amount of misinformation about Islam prevalent in the West, and this book does do a decent job of deconstructing modern misconceptions related to topics such as terrorism, dress, the role of women, and jihad (which was, in my opinion, the best chapter of the book). However, it was just that—a deconstruction for Western ears. Because of this, the book was not representative of Islam on whole but Islam in the West only; or more specifically Islam in the United States . For those wishing to deconstruct modern misconceptions of Islam as found in the West, I would recommend this book as a good starting point. But if you are looking for an introduction to Islam as a world religion, and seeking a more holistic picture of Islamic faith and practice, I would not recommend this book as there are others out there that are better researched and more fair to the global Islamic religion than this work is.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jazmyn

    I won this book through Goodreads Giveaways. I'm disappointed to say the least. I'm halfway through the book and have learned very little new information about Islam. All I got was a highly defensive opinion on how the religion can do no wrong. From an atheist perspective, there seem to be 2 sides of Islam: the side calling for war and the side that still sees no irony calling it a religion of peace. I might have liked the book had he not made the religion seem like such a black and white issue w I won this book through Goodreads Giveaways. I'm disappointed to say the least. I'm halfway through the book and have learned very little new information about Islam. All I got was a highly defensive opinion on how the religion can do no wrong. From an atheist perspective, there seem to be 2 sides of Islam: the side calling for war and the side that still sees no irony calling it a religion of peace. I might have liked the book had he not made the religion seem like such a black and white issue wherein he was practicing it the right way and anyone with negative interpretations of the Quran's message were clearly not true Muslims. I highlighted a few quotes to discuss them here but I've highlighted nearly everything so I will just comment on the ones I found most interesting: 1. "Cultural indoctrination and tradition have overridden these basic teachings that come from the Quran and Muhammad's teachings." That may be so, and I don't know much about Islam specifically, but from what I've experienced in my Christian background, cultural indoctrination and tradition are an almost inseparable part of religion. That's why most Christians celebrate pagan holidays and completely disregard the old testament. Cultural influence. What I do know about Islam is that- like most religions- it can be interpreted many ways and can change over time due to culture and language barriers, especially considering that so much of it is allegorical. 2. When the author speaks about the typical headdresses for Islamic women he almost seems to blow it off as if it was just included in the Quran because of the culture of the time and arguably no longer important (Hmm, just a moment ago he was acting as though culture and interpretations mean little to him.) He then goes on to say "Men are not supposed to pretend that sexual urges don't exist simply because they're "religious". Instead a man is supposed to acknowledge his propensity toward sexual thought and "lower his gaze" to prevent him from acting inappropriately toward any women." Did any men by chance find that insulting? Can men not look unveiled women in the eye without getting "sexual urges"? He makes it sound as though men have to constantly fight the urge to sexually assault women, and I know men who would be offended by that stereotype. The book seems well-researched and provides an excellent liberal perspective of Islam but it wasn't for me. If you're looking for a book on the basics of Islamic practices and beliefs, look elsewhere, if you want reassurance that Islam isn't all bad this is the book for you.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Affad Shaikh

    I often find myself feeling uncomfortable just starting up a conversation with people I don’t know. That’s why before going to events I spend some time researching, reaching out to people that might help me better understand the person I am about to engage with. I try to find similarities while I do my research so the conversation will go easier. The hardest part is when there isn't a point of reference to go off of and I think thats where getting to know a Muslim without ever knowing anything a I often find myself feeling uncomfortable just starting up a conversation with people I don’t know. That’s why before going to events I spend some time researching, reaching out to people that might help me better understand the person I am about to engage with. I try to find similarities while I do my research so the conversation will go easier. The hardest part is when there isn't a point of reference to go off of and I think thats where getting to know a Muslim without ever knowing anything about Islam or history leaves people struggling. However, I read my friend Tariq Jalil’s new book “Islam Plain and Simple” and find it to be a wonderful reference book for those wanting to know about Islam and Muslims. Reading Jalil’s book, I took pleasure in the straightforward unapologetic way in which he framed what Islam was about. In that way, I think it’s a really great introductory book for Muslims in high school that are asked questions about Jesus, or other topics shared between Judaism and Christianity with Islam. Jalil doesn’t hesitate to discuss topics that are heated; instead he methodically presents a Muslim perspective stripped of sectarian perspectives. The book leaves it to the reader to carry on further discussion of the topics through intentional relationship building with a Muslim they may know. In that way, this is a great book for those wanting to learn about Islam and be able to have discussions with Muslims, because the information Jalil presents is a foundational point for developing relationships with people of the Islamic faith. You’d be surprised at how impressed and appreciative a Muslim would be if you knew some basic fundamentals about Islam, that don’t denigrate the individuals beliefs or leaves them having to defend their faith in contrast to what a handful of individuals proclaim as being Islam, which is just their interpretation of the religion. Having relationships with people is the surest way to dispel bigotry and prejudice, and Jalil’s book is a great way to begin understanding Islam so you can have meaningful interactions with Muslims.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    My main purpose in reading this book was to see what Islam is, and is not. I think of myself as being very wide open to considering new ideas, even if many have already declared it "bad" or "good." I want to know for myself. The material in this book is helpful in telling what Islam was meant to be, just as we know what being a Christian is meant to mean. I allow a lot of leeway and sympathy when it comes to apologists for their own causes, because I know how badly they want to be interpreted in My main purpose in reading this book was to see what Islam is, and is not. I think of myself as being very wide open to considering new ideas, even if many have already declared it "bad" or "good." I want to know for myself. The material in this book is helpful in telling what Islam was meant to be, just as we know what being a Christian is meant to mean. I allow a lot of leeway and sympathy when it comes to apologists for their own causes, because I know how badly they want to be interpreted in a good light, but I think the author of this book has gone too far. Like many other religions, the teachings and original hopes so long ago have been corrupted until a modern view of what it has become just won't stand up to it. Christianity, the Islamic faith, even communism look great on paper. All you have to do is take the human factor out of the idea and you couldn't ask for better. But you couldn't find the similarity between the two different sides of the model. So this book tells you how wonderful Islam is, and I agree that it sounds like an ideal way to live. The information on what it's supposed to be, is great. The author knows that to a large extent, that is not the way the faith is practiced, or rather prescribed by governments/culture. Even admitting to its weaknesses is admirable. However, I think he goes too far in in hoping to convince the reader that it is not as it is commonly perceived. I feel that religion on the whole does not bring out the best in people and was rather turned off in the way the book was written. It just tried my patience too much. Tell me what your religion was supposed to be, give me the foundation, how was it originally perceived? I can work out for myself what it has become. This is not a rant against Islam. I have the same problem with many things; give me the facts, and let me come to my own conclusions.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Scott Haraburda

    Goodreads First Reads Giveaway Book. ------------------------------------ Islam Plain and Simple is a non-fictional book that discusses major aspects of the Muslim faith, with over one billion followers. This book includes the life of Muhammad, Islam’s last prophet, and the contributions its followers have contributed to human civilization. This book was well-written with concise information that was both engaging to the reader and balanced with many competing views of the topic. This included an i Goodreads First Reads Giveaway Book. ------------------------------------ Islam Plain and Simple is a non-fictional book that discusses major aspects of the Muslim faith, with over one billion followers. This book includes the life of Muhammad, Islam’s last prophet, and the contributions its followers have contributed to human civilization. This book was well-written with concise information that was both engaging to the reader and balanced with many competing views of the topic. This included an interesting discussion of their views of Judaism and Christianity, such as how Jesus fits into their faith. This book is a good start to helping others who don’t understand these people, especially if they desire to eliminate bigotry and prejudice amongst the major global religions. The author, Tariq Jalil, a broadcast professional, is no stranger to this topic as he was born and raised into the Muslim faith in Ohio. My only concern about this book is that it focuses primarily upon Islam in the West without delving into the views of that religion in other parts of the world. It’s like writing a book about Christianity by describing the view of Catholicism without discussing any of the Protestant versions. Still, I thought the author did a splendid job for those readers wanting to understand the Islamic faith in the West. Islam Plain and Simple is a valuable resource for anyone seeking an authentic insider’s perspective of the Islamic religion for Westerners.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    I received this book for free from a GoodReads First Reads. The review below is mine. I thoroughly enjoyed reading 'Islam Plain and Simple". The information about Islam is written in such a way that it's very easy to read. The chapters are compiled of subjects including Islam's core beliefs, Islam and interactions with other religions, women's roles and treatment, laws, jihad and terrorism, Muhammad and his role in the foundation of Islam and whether or not if he practiced what he preached, etc . I received this book for free from a GoodReads First Reads. The review below is mine. I thoroughly enjoyed reading 'Islam Plain and Simple". The information about Islam is written in such a way that it's very easy to read. The chapters are compiled of subjects including Islam's core beliefs, Islam and interactions with other religions, women's roles and treatment, laws, jihad and terrorism, Muhammad and his role in the foundation of Islam and whether or not if he practiced what he preached, etc . . . 'Islam Plain and Simple' was effectively researched and includes a Bibliography which is invaluable for those that may be interested in further reading. This is a handy reference book, as well as it is educational. I read it in a couple of days, and will re-read it, as I always pick up more information and insight the second, third . . . time around. Read 'Islam Plain and Simple' if you'd like to learn more about this religion in an easy to read and comprehensive format.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Bennett

    ~Received for free from First Reads on Goodreads ISLAM Plain and Simple by Tariq Jalil is a beautiful non-fiction book that's main purpose is myth debunking all the existing stereotypes on Islam formed by modern society. With complete support of all claims with quotes from the Quran and Hadith, the holy texts of Islam, it provides a factual telling of the beliefs of a religion that has had constant scrutiny from media and society. I recommend this book to everyone, regardless of religion. It is an ~Received for free from First Reads on Goodreads ISLAM Plain and Simple by Tariq Jalil is a beautiful non-fiction book that's main purpose is myth debunking all the existing stereotypes on Islam formed by modern society. With complete support of all claims with quotes from the Quran and Hadith, the holy texts of Islam, it provides a factual telling of the beliefs of a religion that has had constant scrutiny from media and society. I recommend this book to everyone, regardless of religion. It is an eye opening book that makes you realise how misjudged Muslims really are. It puts into perspective why things have occurred and urges the reader to understand how much of the recent terrorism and abuse is completely unsupported by the religion the culprits claim to be supporting their actions.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Manaal K

    This is the best book I've ever read in regards to Islam. It breaks down stereotypes and informs without editorializing or judging. The author simply describes the subject matter as its told from the most authentic sources, but also in an interesting way. A quick read, Islam Plain & Simple is a refreshing break from the usual exhaustive books on religion. I think it's an absolute must read for those bewildered by the concept of four wives, 72 virgins, and the oppression of women. Don't let what yo This is the best book I've ever read in regards to Islam. It breaks down stereotypes and informs without editorializing or judging. The author simply describes the subject matter as its told from the most authentic sources, but also in an interesting way. A quick read, Islam Plain & Simple is a refreshing break from the usual exhaustive books on religion. I think it's an absolute must read for those bewildered by the concept of four wives, 72 virgins, and the oppression of women. Don't let what you see on TV turn you away from the subject matter, because whether you care about religion or not, it's still good to know what 1.2 billion people believe and how it effects the world around us.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kpw

    As a non-Muslim (actually, as a person who does not practice any organized religion), I found this book to be an educational and insightful read. This book is a clear, easy-to-understand guide to the basic principles that govern this ancient religion, and how those beliefs influence the lives of modern, practicing Muslims. With so much misinformation (not to mention fear mongering) in the media about Islam, I think most Americans (be it adults or even children) could benefit from learning more ab As a non-Muslim (actually, as a person who does not practice any organized religion), I found this book to be an educational and insightful read. This book is a clear, easy-to-understand guide to the basic principles that govern this ancient religion, and how those beliefs influence the lives of modern, practicing Muslims. With so much misinformation (not to mention fear mongering) in the media about Islam, I think most Americans (be it adults or even children) could benefit from learning more about this widespread religion and the values of its people. Jalil's book sets the record straight on the most commonly misunderstood practices (citing mostly cultural, not religious, differences) and provides an eloquent look at the main pillars of faith that Muslims live by. A must-read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Munira S

    Everything you ever wanted to know about Islam can be found in this book. The book is well-researched and explains basic Islamic concepts and principles. There tends to be a lot of misinformation out there and this book aims to cut through media headlines and ignorance of the Muslim faith. What makes the book particularly valuable in today's fast-paced society is that it explains the religion of Islam in a succinct manner and enables readers to digest information quickly. Several sections in the Everything you ever wanted to know about Islam can be found in this book. The book is well-researched and explains basic Islamic concepts and principles. There tends to be a lot of misinformation out there and this book aims to cut through media headlines and ignorance of the Muslim faith. What makes the book particularly valuable in today's fast-paced society is that it explains the religion of Islam in a succinct manner and enables readers to digest information quickly. Several sections in the book deal with hot topics that many people are generally curious about, such as women's status and rights, Islam's position on terrorism, and what kind of person Muhammad was. I couldn't recommend this book more.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Olson

    I won this book through a first-reads giveaway. The title is pretty self-explanatory. The author simply and objectively explains some controversial topics related to Islam without getting overly apologetic or bogged down in academic explanations. It was a very easy book to read and understand and I would definitely recommend it to non-Muslim friends who want to know some more facts about Islam or have questions on some controversial issues. Unfortunately, the book was also very dry. While I know I won this book through a first-reads giveaway. The title is pretty self-explanatory. The author simply and objectively explains some controversial topics related to Islam without getting overly apologetic or bogged down in academic explanations. It was a very easy book to read and understand and I would definitely recommend it to non-Muslim friends who want to know some more facts about Islam or have questions on some controversial issues. Unfortunately, the book was also very dry. While I know the author was trying to be objective, I think hearing more of his personal voice and experience as a Muslim would have made the book more interesting to read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Noor Saadeh

    Super! Relevant to our times. Simple facts backed by Quranic verses and sound hadith of Bukhari and Muslim. Tariq Jamil doesn't shy away from any of the hot topics. He simply and eloquently explains the real Islam and helps make distinctions between the religion itself, the revelation and the current behavior and manners of Muslims which are often not Islamic in the least but rather cultural. I would heartily recommend this book as a gift to give anyone looking for a good, concise read to know a Super! Relevant to our times. Simple facts backed by Quranic verses and sound hadith of Bukhari and Muslim. Tariq Jamil doesn't shy away from any of the hot topics. He simply and eloquently explains the real Islam and helps make distinctions between the religion itself, the revelation and the current behavior and manners of Muslims which are often not Islamic in the least but rather cultural. I would heartily recommend this book as a gift to give anyone looking for a good, concise read to know about Islam and discover the truth behind the stereotypes. Easy read but and to the point.

  17. 5 out of 5

    J

    Highly recommended. This book is a rare find in its genre. It is refreshingly honest and objective, discussing in a “plain and simple” manner not just the basic tenets of the Islamic faith, but also dares to broach topics not only controversial to non-Muslims, but to Muslims as well. Plain and simple, yes, but makes no intellectual compromises. Providing facts with extensively researched, razor sharp accuracy, its well-written and thoughtful prose also makes it a very easy and extremely enjoyabl Highly recommended. This book is a rare find in its genre. It is refreshingly honest and objective, discussing in a “plain and simple” manner not just the basic tenets of the Islamic faith, but also dares to broach topics not only controversial to non-Muslims, but to Muslims as well. Plain and simple, yes, but makes no intellectual compromises. Providing facts with extensively researched, razor sharp accuracy, its well-written and thoughtful prose also makes it a very easy and extremely enjoyable read for anyone, regardless of their own religious beliefs or lack thereof.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    This is one man's subjective view on how he wanted to present Islam. While he used supporting evidence to back up his arguments, there are many angles and points that are conspicuously missing or glossed over quickly and forgotten about. I was left wanting more. Maybe this was intentional, but it didn't feel like it. It almost felt like I was being steered away from exploring those questions. Perhaps there will be more from Mr. Jalil on this subject. If so, I'd love to read it as his style is el This is one man's subjective view on how he wanted to present Islam. While he used supporting evidence to back up his arguments, there are many angles and points that are conspicuously missing or glossed over quickly and forgotten about. I was left wanting more. Maybe this was intentional, but it didn't feel like it. It almost felt like I was being steered away from exploring those questions. Perhaps there will be more from Mr. Jalil on this subject. If so, I'd love to read it as his style is eloquent and easy to follow.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    Mr. Jalil's book is an excellent examination of one of the world's most practiced religions. Jalil handles the subject matter appropriately and isn't afraid of tackling some of the more controversial topics in an unbiased, honest way. The writing is clear, engaging, and the book itself moves along at a quick, easy-to-follow pace full of factual and reliable information. I highly recommend Islam Plain and Simple to anyone interested in Islam, religion, or simply ethics. Mr. Jalil's book is an excellent examination of one of the world's most practiced religions. Jalil handles the subject matter appropriately and isn't afraid of tackling some of the more controversial topics in an unbiased, honest way. The writing is clear, engaging, and the book itself moves along at a quick, easy-to-follow pace full of factual and reliable information. I highly recommend Islam Plain and Simple to anyone interested in Islam, religion, or simply ethics.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jakenv

    Was greatly impressed with clarity of writing and information set forth by author. Removed some misconceptions. Anyone wanting some insight into Islam will find a good resource. Sharing with friends in local book club for discussion. This is not radical propaganda. Received as winner from Goodreads which did not influence my review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Julian Grev

    I believe that if every Moslem and non-Moslem read this book, there would far greater understanding of Mohammed and Islam, less vilification of Islam, and far less ability to radicalize Islamists.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Torriah

    I won this in the First Reads giveaway! It was an easy yet interesting read. Well written and very informative. Reveals a lot about Islam. Great eye opener.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    Friend recommended and I was wondering about premise. Not propaganda just a concise explanation.

  24. 5 out of 5

    ann mcdaniel

    This books explains what Islam is and how it came to be. It falls short though of explaining how and why fanatical muslims miss the point though they profess Islam.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jameslweaver

  27. 4 out of 5

    KR15

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sadia Ash

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lena Khan

  30. 4 out of 5

    Naveen

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