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Border Patrol Nation: Dispatches from the Front Lines of Homeland Security (City Lights Open Media)

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"[Miller] offers a vision of what the military-industrial complex looks like once it's transported, jobs and all, to the US–Mexican border and turned into a consumer mall for the post-9/11 era . . . [it's] a striking and original picture."--Tom Engelhardt, TomDispatch "What Jeremy Scahill was to Blackwater, Todd Miller is to the U.S. Border Patrol!"--Tom Miller, author, On "[Miller] offers a vision of what the military-industrial complex looks like once it's transported, jobs and all, to the US–Mexican border and turned into a consumer mall for the post-9/11 era . . . [it's] a striking and original picture."--Tom Engelhardt, TomDispatch "What Jeremy Scahill was to Blackwater, Todd Miller is to the U.S. Border Patrol!"--Tom Miller, author, On the Border: Portraits of America's Southwestern Frontier Armed authorities watch from a military-grade surveillance tower as lines of people stream toward the security checkpoint, tickets in hand, anxious and excited to get through the gate. Few seem to notice or care that the US Border Patrol is monitoring the Super Bowl, as they have for years, one of the many ways that forces created to police the borders are now being used, in an increasingly militarized fashion, to survey and monitor the whole of American society. In fast-paced prose, Todd Miller sounds an alarm as he chronicles the changing landscape. Traveling the country—and beyond—to speak with the people most involved with and impacted by the Border Patrol, he combines these first-hand encounters with careful research to expose a vast and booming industry for high-end technology, weapons, surveillance, and prisons. While politicians and corporations reap substantial profits, the experiences of millions of men, women, and children point to staggering humanitarian consequences. Border Patrol Nation shows us in stark relief how the entire country has become a militarized border zone, with consequences that affect us all. Todd Miller has worked on US border issues for over fifteen years. His writing has appeared in the New York Times, Mother Jones, the Nation, TomDispatch, the Huffington Post, Al-Jazeera English, Common Dreams, and many others.


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"[Miller] offers a vision of what the military-industrial complex looks like once it's transported, jobs and all, to the US–Mexican border and turned into a consumer mall for the post-9/11 era . . . [it's] a striking and original picture."--Tom Engelhardt, TomDispatch "What Jeremy Scahill was to Blackwater, Todd Miller is to the U.S. Border Patrol!"--Tom Miller, author, On "[Miller] offers a vision of what the military-industrial complex looks like once it's transported, jobs and all, to the US–Mexican border and turned into a consumer mall for the post-9/11 era . . . [it's] a striking and original picture."--Tom Engelhardt, TomDispatch "What Jeremy Scahill was to Blackwater, Todd Miller is to the U.S. Border Patrol!"--Tom Miller, author, On the Border: Portraits of America's Southwestern Frontier Armed authorities watch from a military-grade surveillance tower as lines of people stream toward the security checkpoint, tickets in hand, anxious and excited to get through the gate. Few seem to notice or care that the US Border Patrol is monitoring the Super Bowl, as they have for years, one of the many ways that forces created to police the borders are now being used, in an increasingly militarized fashion, to survey and monitor the whole of American society. In fast-paced prose, Todd Miller sounds an alarm as he chronicles the changing landscape. Traveling the country—and beyond—to speak with the people most involved with and impacted by the Border Patrol, he combines these first-hand encounters with careful research to expose a vast and booming industry for high-end technology, weapons, surveillance, and prisons. While politicians and corporations reap substantial profits, the experiences of millions of men, women, and children point to staggering humanitarian consequences. Border Patrol Nation shows us in stark relief how the entire country has become a militarized border zone, with consequences that affect us all. Todd Miller has worked on US border issues for over fifteen years. His writing has appeared in the New York Times, Mother Jones, the Nation, TomDispatch, the Huffington Post, Al-Jazeera English, Common Dreams, and many others.

30 review for Border Patrol Nation: Dispatches from the Front Lines of Homeland Security (City Lights Open Media)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tinea

    Miller does an excellent job combining facts and research with an overarching thesis and story. Miller documents bizarrely sadistic and arbitrary border policing incidents, and through his research (and breadth of interviews) is able to connect it to high-level BP policies in hiring, training, and enforcement. The book takes a sharp look at different aspects of the US Border Patrol, to demonstrate how the BP acts with impunity, without constitutional accountability and outside the checks-and-bal Miller does an excellent job combining facts and research with an overarching thesis and story. Miller documents bizarrely sadistic and arbitrary border policing incidents, and through his research (and breadth of interviews) is able to connect it to high-level BP policies in hiring, training, and enforcement. The book takes a sharp look at different aspects of the US Border Patrol, to demonstrate how the BP acts with impunity, without constitutional accountability and outside the checks-and-balances judicial system, to systematically police borders based on race and perceived identity. What do I mean by 'perceived identity'? For example, Miller documents cases of US citizens being 'deported' to foreign countries without money, phone calls, or other basic logistics (which is how the US deports everyone, without care towards survival post-deportation) because their language or race or association marked them as 'foreign' to a white-supremacist system. Similarly, he documents harassment and detention of US citizens of Arab descent whose present-day treatment echoes the US government's choice to treat Japanese immigrant and Japanese-descended citizens as associated with enemy combatants during WWII. Because it is exempt from many of the laws that govern policing in the US, the beefed up, post-9/11 Border Patrol acts as a supplementary, para-military police force, on call to other agencies whose rules of engagement are more restricted by the constitution. The true weight of the book comes across towards the end, when several distinct chapters on border policing along the Canadian border, at checkpoints in the interior US, and in BP training programs abroad in countries like Dominican Republic, all comes together to paint a "border" that is not a physical barrier between one country and the next, but a globalized tool to manage movement of labor and 'undesirable' people. Profit-driven immigration detention centers with quotas for how many beds the government must keep full at all times, the timing of immigration raids for after harvest seasons, and the desire of rightwing politicians for restricted work visas instead of immigration all add up to a picture of a corporate-controlled, exploitative system. The book builds slowly but gets pretty intense. Unfortunately, I felt like Miller undermined the books well-grounded research with extraneous editorializing. It is hard to toe the line between emotional connection and care for your subject plus easy-to-read relateability without going overboard into ranting. Miller didn't always succeed, to the point where I would hesitate to give this book to someone who did not already agree that Border Patrol is abusive. Despite the evidence, the occasionally rambling stories that present the evidence can be distracting. This book feels like a tool for campaigners who need facts and a framework to back up their experiences, but not a campaign tool in itself. Maybe not: I'm a little too biased myself to have a good feel for what an outside observer needs for convincing.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sylvia Longmire

    It’s hard not to assume what ideological track a book is going to take when it repeatedly uses the terms “militarization” and “social control” in its first chapters when referring to the US Border Patrol. And indeed, author Todd Miller comes across as someone with a serious bone to pick as he portrays agents and officers working along our nation’s international borders as soldiers almost akin to Nazi Germany’s Gestapo. He opens up his new book, titled Border Patrol Nation, by detailing US Customs It’s hard not to assume what ideological track a book is going to take when it repeatedly uses the terms “militarization” and “social control” in its first chapters when referring to the US Border Patrol. And indeed, author Todd Miller comes across as someone with a serious bone to pick as he portrays agents and officers working along our nation’s international borders as soldiers almost akin to Nazi Germany’s Gestapo. He opens up his new book, titled Border Patrol Nation, by detailing US Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) involvement in providing security for the past dozen or so Super Bowl games. This is not a huge secret; CBP publishes several press releases each year explaining how CBP works in collaboration with state and local police, as well as the Department of Defense, to enforce no-fly zones over the stadiums and conduct security checks of vehicles entering the stadium parking areas. The agency participates only at the request of the federal government, and it brings to the table many resources that the locals don’t have or can’t acquire before the big game. But because agents are enforcing federal immigration laws in Super Bowl locations like Miami and Phoenix, this somehow characterizes CBP’s role as one of an intrusive and human rights-violating paramilitary organization. Oddly enough, he highlights this unique mission in a way that says, Can you believe you didn’t know about this? Unfortunately for Miller, the fact that few people probably know about CBP’s involvement in Super Bowl security—and the dearth of irate liberal media coverage about it—implies that maybe their actions really aren’t intrusive at all. Considering how long they’ve been doing it, it’s interesting he comes across as the first to “break” this story, even though the media has written about it before. This is just the start of a book that feels all over the place with regard to Miller’s criticisms of the border security “complex.” This isn’t to say that he doesn’t provide solid information; he interviewed many of the same people I did for Border Insecurity, like Glenn Spencer of American Border Patrol and Bruce Wright at the University of Arizona Tech Park. The interviews themselves and the statistics and descriptions of various aspects of border security, like the virtual border fence and border-related conferences, are accurate enough. He also does a good job of explaining the burgeoning border security industry, including the billions of dollars being spent on research and development of new technology and the growth of small companies seeking a piece of this ever-growing pie. However, Miller’s liberal ideology frequently gets in the way of what had the potential to be a decent analysis of the expansion of Border Patrol’s presence in the United States. He provides a considerable number of anecdotes from illegal immigrants and residents of the Tohono O’odham Tribal Nation where they claim they were verbally or physically harassed or abused by Border Patrol agents, and the stories are very emotionally intense and convincing. Miller cites reports by the United Nations and human rights organizations that condemn the agency’s alleged excessive use of force, but he doesn’t say if the victims he spoke to ever reported the incidents to other US authorities or filed a formal complaint with CBP. Despite the picture he paints of the Tribal Nation as being under the thumb of an oppressive border agency, Miller does give a factual account of the high rate of Nation residents involved in drug and human smuggling. When I worked as an intelligence analyst in northern California many years ago, I had already started hearing how the Nation would accept payments from the cartels to move drugs through the impoverished reservation, and how tribal police tended to be uncooperative with other law enforcement agencies. As a Tucson resident, those perceptions definitely persist, and I was disheartened to read about Tohono O’odham youth getting involved with smugglers, as typical this is for a cartel recruiting venture. Unfortunately, Miller swings back to being ideologically one-sided when he moves into his chapter about the northern border. He writes extensively about Mexican and other minority populations being profiled and targeted by the Border Patrol in Detroit, but doesn’t cite any demographic statistics regarding the estimated population of illegal immigrants in the city. If 80 percent of Detroit’s illegal immigrant population were white and 70 percent of deportees were people of color, then Miller would have a serious point to consider. However, without context, we’re left to base our conclusions on Miller’s assumptions alone. He also focuses his northern border chapter mostly on illegal immigrants and his view that DHS surveillance is seriously overreaching. But he never once touches upon the insane amount of illicit cross-border trafficking occurring along the St Clair and Detroit rivers, to include illegal drugs and large volumes of cash heading in both directions. The “thumb” area of Michigan is notorious for small single-engine planes loaded with drugs flying across the border outside of national radar coverage, and the response time of CBP boats on the river often isn’t fast enough to tackle the heavy smuggling activity there. Miller mentions none of this in relation to the reason CBP has increased its presence along our northern border. Miller is a good writer; that’s definitely not the underlying problem with Border Patrol Nation. His stories are engaging and the reading is easy. However, structurally there is little to no flow, and he doesn’t make any direct points or specifically state the main thesis of the book until the last few pages. Even then, his argument is that “according to today’s Homeland Security regime all but the all but the elite and all-powerful few should be monitored as a potential threat.” He states both implicitly and explicitly throughout the book that the existence and expansion of the Border Patrol is equivalent to an imperialistic and racist attempt to divide the American people in the “have and have-nots” and the “global North and global South.” Furthermore, Miller wonders how our government can spend so much money on border security while looking away from the economy, poverty, and homelessness. He offers little to nothing by way of a solution, other than the generic “resistance.” He talks about a cyclist who lay down under a Border Patrol vehicle to protest the apprehension of an illegal immigrant. But his entire book merely sends the general message that “the Border Patrol is evil” without seriously acknowledging that violent drug smugglers and criminals are crossing our borders illegally every day, attacking US law enforcement on a regular basis, and raping and assaulting on US soil the very illegal immigrants he champions. Ultimately, Border Patrol Nation comes across as a call for open borders, paints the US Border Patrol as an agency filled with agents who have little regard for human and civil rights of both US and “non-citizens,” and offers no alternative to securing our borders from those who mean to do us harm other than protest or civil resistance. Miller’s pleasant writing style and expertise is overshadowed by his very clear bias, and he will turn off a lot of readers who could learn a lot from his work simply because he’s writing for an audience that shares his liberal viewpoint.

  3. 4 out of 5

    victor harris

    After a somewhat slow start, the author gains momentum and delivers a blistering critique of the increasingly expanding security state. Under the pretext of protecting the borders, various government agencies and enforcement units have swollen beyond any credible or manageable standard and have extended their reach into the privacy of many American citizens. Now as part of the military-industrial complex, the Border Patrol has seen a huge surge in growth and funding and manufactures more detent After a somewhat slow start, the author gains momentum and delivers a blistering critique of the increasingly expanding security state. Under the pretext of protecting the borders, various government agencies and enforcement units have swollen beyond any credible or manageable standard and have extended their reach into the privacy of many American citizens. Now as part of the military-industrial complex, the Border Patrol has seen a huge surge in growth and funding and manufactures more detentions to justify such outlays. Needless to say, private businesses are strong advocates of such policies as government contracts are abundant for feeding such an enterprise. Whether it is the Canadian or Mexican border, citizenship and documentation is no protection against the intrusive tentacles of the Border Patrol and affiliated law enforcement entities. Puerto Ricans (American citizens) are classified as " Mexicans" and deported, and states such as South Carolina refuse to recognize their citizenship status and deny them driver's licenses. The book details a litany of other abuses that have became routine as the hydra of Homeland Security continues on its merry or not so merry way. Includes full citations of funding, detentions, and deportations as well as a run down of the who's who in the security game. Appalling and highly recommended for anyone interested in the topic.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    After Pastor Max Villatoro from our local community was deported to Honduras recently, I went in search of books to help me understand what had happened. How a father of four American kids, who is legally employed and who serves his community as a pastor, could be forcibly taken from his home and family despite a massive national effort to protest his deportation is enough to drive a person to despair. Miller's book illuminates the militarization of America's creeping border patrol in post-9/11 After Pastor Max Villatoro from our local community was deported to Honduras recently, I went in search of books to help me understand what had happened. How a father of four American kids, who is legally employed and who serves his community as a pastor, could be forcibly taken from his home and family despite a massive national effort to protest his deportation is enough to drive a person to despair. Miller's book illuminates the militarization of America's creeping border patrol in post-9/11 America and the psychology that drives its cruelties with stories or "dispatches" from around the country--Florida, the Carolinas, New Mexico, and Michigan, to name a few of the places featured. Miller's book isn't all despairing, though. He ends with stories of resistance by regular people, signs of hope amidst a system that otherwise seems to have lost any moral bearings.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    A powerful review of how Americans are sacrificing free speech and freedom of movement in the name of securing our borders, the resisters to this, and the appeals made for ever greater internal controls and surveillance. Recommended for individuals and communities concerned about human rights and true freedoms, especially those engaging in making peace real and working for humane comprehensive immigration reform.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Maryc

    So disturbing. The police state is already here and god bless the resistance! Homeland "Security" is using the cover of preventing terrorism to target and attack people of color, activists, journalists and academics, as well as jailing and deporting hundreds of thousands of migrants each year. Customs and "Border" Patrol do not have to follow constitutional guidelines as other law enforcement do. For at least 100 miles in from every border (encompassing whole states in some cases), the constitut So disturbing. The police state is already here and god bless the resistance! Homeland "Security" is using the cover of preventing terrorism to target and attack people of color, activists, journalists and academics, as well as jailing and deporting hundreds of thousands of migrants each year. Customs and "Border" Patrol do not have to follow constitutional guidelines as other law enforcement do. For at least 100 miles in from every border (encompassing whole states in some cases), the constitution has been suspended. The fiscal priority of pouring money into more and more violent Big Brother police state apparatus, rather than lifting up the poor, homeless, elderly, and other vulnerable members of society, is not questioned in the halls of congress. However, after yet another homegrown white guy terrorist attack in Las Vegas...we still pound the war drums and increase the fear factor toward the "other" so that we no longer act with compassion or welcome as a nation.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

    Skip this if you're looking for a polished review. These were my personal thoughts on the book. I fully expected the book to be 'sensationalism' but right away realized it was just a sensational heart felt book with good references, and an extremely important message. If you think we are living through the erosion of our civil liberties and read books like 'The New Jim Crow', or 'Mexico Unconquered' you will still probably find startling revelations in the same vein. It is deeply saddening that Skip this if you're looking for a polished review. These were my personal thoughts on the book. I fully expected the book to be 'sensationalism' but right away realized it was just a sensational heart felt book with good references, and an extremely important message. If you think we are living through the erosion of our civil liberties and read books like 'The New Jim Crow', or 'Mexico Unconquered' you will still probably find startling revelations in the same vein. It is deeply saddening that so many 'Americans' (from the U.S) are on board and gung-ho with the institutionalization of racism that is rapidly expanding in the form of border control and us against them mind sets. Didn't we learn anything collectively from Chinese exclusion, or Japanese internment? Some parts that stood out to me were the totalitarian nature of the border patrol when firing one of there own because he voiced support for socialism, and an end to the war on drugs to a co-worker. Or another CBP agent that was held suspect by his peers for not owning a gun. The lack of humanity and disdain that is shown toward victims as if they were less than feral animals. The ever-present mentality of 'manifest destiny'. Mr Miller covers a lot of topics in a short easy to read book. From how the nature of borders has been extended all over the world to Edward Snowden, and privacy. I highly recommend this book. And I totally hate the direction our country is spiraling toward. I want to immigrate away it is so shameful.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    A story that deserves and needs to be told. The author shows immense courage and deep sensitivity in shining a light on the darkness, racism and abuses of the US Border Patrol who act without the constitutional limitations of other law enforcement groups. This a very big story that has, for too long, flown under the radar of the media and US historians. Thank you, Todd Miller.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Johnny R

    Todd Miller has researched, written, and worked on border patrol and immigration issues for 15 years prior to his book being released. Miller gives us his point of view of where a majority of his work was done at in Arizona, Mexico, and his experiences living close to international borders. Miller gives many stories and accounts of the workings of border patrol agents and the department. The book is very easy to read and keeps you engaged, Millers accounts of the stories are most certainly his o Todd Miller has researched, written, and worked on border patrol and immigration issues for 15 years prior to his book being released. Miller gives us his point of view of where a majority of his work was done at in Arizona, Mexico, and his experiences living close to international borders. Miller gives many stories and accounts of the workings of border patrol agents and the department. The book is very easy to read and keeps you engaged, Millers accounts of the stories are most certainly his opinions and is not an academic type of book, this is purely a narrative of his opinions and stories. Miller almost presents the Border Patrol agency as a very cruel organization and has no regard for civil liberties, he also talks about the changes since 9/11 and how Border Patrol functions with a different mission being more powerful. Miller does this throughout the book starting with the Super Bowl accounts where agents assist in looking for potential threats and searching for possible illegal aliens for a Super Bowl in Florida. Miller does it again when he is talking about the professor who teaches law that crosses over from Canada. Miller provides some riveting statics about the Border Patrol Agency that sound alarming and gives some really good stories on how the Border Patrol can be very aggressive towards individuals. The Border Patrol agency is a very large and comprehensive group that is tasked with a very important part of the DHS’ mission to protecting the Homeland via sea, land and air. If you are given the chance or are deciding if you should read this book, go ahead and do it, even if your thoughts or opinions are not the same as Millers’ view on Border Patrol it is still a very great easy read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Miller

    Miller’s research seems credible and his storytelling is touching. By talking with a wide variety of players at and around the border, he presents a number of viewpoints. I’d be surprised if there are many readers that cannot find a voice that they had not heretofore heard. In this day of oversimplistic border rhetoric, Miller’s description of the Border Patrol police state becomes an even more powerful piece of knowledge, with plenty of reasons to mourn.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    A terrifying read of the unimaginable power the Border Patrol has within the US (and somehow also without). Civil and human rights are violated without question, and an incredible amount of money is wasted to do so which could be far better applied in supporting communities rather than tearing them apart. There is no justification for this to be allowed without any semblance of transparency, and Miller presents well-researched reasons why any American should be pretty damn angry about it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Caldwell

    Read as an assignment for graduate school. I tried to take this book for what it was but still found it extremely difficult to finish. Miller does a great job of providing a variety of cases and scenarios to build a well-rounded picture of “Border Patrol Nation,” yet conveys the information in a very uninteresting tone.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bri Taylor

    Incredibly researched. Brilliant insight into how the militarization of CBD / ICE has changed the frontiers of American borders for migrant families and potential citizens. Insightful, powerful, important.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Lovins

    this was tough to follow for me, I didn't really like the way the story bounced around the narrators.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jenifer

    Devastating...the police state is here. Resist.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nicolas Adame

    Let me begin by saying that I REALLY wanted to give this book a chance, honestly, I did; but the pictures Mr. Miller paints in this book is unbearable. The entire premise of this book centers around the thought that we Americans give up to many of our individual freedoms on a day to day basis in order to have protection. Throughout the book, the US Border Patrol is seen as some 1984-type big brother agency with it's sole intention being to deprive you of your rights. This simply isn't true, and i Let me begin by saying that I REALLY wanted to give this book a chance, honestly, I did; but the pictures Mr. Miller paints in this book is unbearable. The entire premise of this book centers around the thought that we Americans give up to many of our individual freedoms on a day to day basis in order to have protection. Throughout the book, the US Border Patrol is seen as some 1984-type big brother agency with it's sole intention being to deprive you of your rights. This simply isn't true, and is rather unbearable to read. Another thing the author does is he takes us to various border worlds. The book starts and ends at the Super Bowl, which he likens to a showpiece for public-private policing and for the creation of entertainment from border enforcement. He takes us to his hometown of Niagara Falls, which is across an increasingly policed line from Canada. He brings us to the sovereign lands of the Tohono O’odham nation, where locals estimate that the majority of resident have suffered abuses at the hands of border agents. He also takes us to the Dominican Republic, where U.S. Customs and Border Patrol plays a role in ensuring the border with Haiti is strictly enforced. All of this is completely irrelevant when talking about our borders back home Overall, save you time and go watch paint dry. It will definitely have a more positive effect on your life than this book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    Border Patrol Nation by Todd Miller is a free LibraryThing Early Reviewers advance reader copy of a paperback book I actually received twice; the one I've read and reviewed was sent from San Francisco's famed City Lights Books, because, hey, that's awesome. Border Patrol Nation covers issues and histories of the borders at Arizona, Texas, Detroit, Niagara Falls, and the Dominican Republic; all the while taking a very technical, police/paramilitary-speak, world news tone. I most gravitated toward Border Patrol Nation by Todd Miller is a free LibraryThing Early Reviewers advance reader copy of a paperback book I actually received twice; the one I've read and reviewed was sent from San Francisco's famed City Lights Books, because, hey, that's awesome. Border Patrol Nation covers issues and histories of the borders at Arizona, Texas, Detroit, Niagara Falls, and the Dominican Republic; all the while taking a very technical, police/paramilitary-speak, world news tone. I most gravitated toward the chapters that had to do with the Explorers (the Border Patrol youth league) and people who had political vested interest in border policy, but had a foot in the country that the U.S. is bordered with (mostly family that frequently makr crossings that have been arrested and/or been in custody for doing so).

  18. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Garcia

    Todd Miller is the real deal. Finally, after living my entire life in the US-Mexico borderlands, I have found a book that both clearly and comprehensively tackles the problem of border patrol militarization and surveillance. Weaving personal anecdotes with facts, Miller lays out the wide-ranging, detrimental impacts of increased patrols, "self-policing," and the exponential amount of funding granted to the border patrol. Whether you're new to the issue of border security or have lived it like mys Todd Miller is the real deal. Finally, after living my entire life in the US-Mexico borderlands, I have found a book that both clearly and comprehensively tackles the problem of border patrol militarization and surveillance. Weaving personal anecdotes with facts, Miller lays out the wide-ranging, detrimental impacts of increased patrols, "self-policing," and the exponential amount of funding granted to the border patrol. Whether you're new to the issue of border security or have lived it like myself, you should definitely read this book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tom Webb

    Details the changes wrought by 9/11 to re-define national security. We now have a 100 mile border around the entire continental U.S. which is virtually a constitutionally free zone for government investigators to adapt any methods they choose to "insure" border security. The quote on the title page re: an encounter Senator Patrick Leahy of Vermont had with government border patrol person is utterly chilling. It also details the "new" bottomless pit for arms dealsrs and security experts to market Details the changes wrought by 9/11 to re-define national security. We now have a 100 mile border around the entire continental U.S. which is virtually a constitutionally free zone for government investigators to adapt any methods they choose to "insure" border security. The quote on the title page re: an encounter Senator Patrick Leahy of Vermont had with government border patrol person is utterly chilling. It also details the "new" bottomless pit for arms dealsrs and security experts to market their latest gadgets. So the war has come home.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    Can't wait for Miller's next book. His media interviews suggest he will be broadening his scope to include a deeper look at US DHS's border security "cooperation" with countries outside the Americas and the impact of this on global migration and security policy, and therefore on people moving, as people do, anywhere on the planet. That said, this particular book's scope can't be described as narrow. Astonishing and empathetic reporting, too. Highly recommended.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Great historical investigative journalism about the apparatus behind controlling the U.S. borders -- the political history of border regulation, the current politics, and the international dimensions. I'm a total immigration law geek, so I have a bias. But I recommend this for anyone who wants to learn more about this part of our government and national policies.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    Dated but still important, more for the sharpness of Miller's polemical style and his ability to draw connections between the national security state and the continued erosion of the civil liberties of Americans. Demonizing migrants is only one aspect but is an important one that Miller illustrates well.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Wes Pue

    Very informative

  24. 4 out of 5

    William D.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ken

  26. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Chrisman

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christina Shu

  28. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  29. 5 out of 5

    Annie LeMasters

  30. 4 out of 5

    David Roy

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