counter create hit An Introduction to Meditation with Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche (Joy of Living Video Series) - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

An Introduction to Meditation with Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche (Joy of Living Video Series)

Availability: Ready to download

In meditation, we explore the landscape of our experience with mindful awareness. What we discover is a true and lasting happiness that does not depend on the outer conditions of our lives. In this four-part series, Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche will take you step-by-step through the process of starting a meditation practice. It's not as hard as you think. All you need is a sinc In meditation, we explore the landscape of our experience with mindful awareness. What we discover is a true and lasting happiness that does not depend on the outer conditions of our lives. In this four-part series, Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche will take you step-by-step through the process of starting a meditation practice. It's not as hard as you think. All you need is a sincere desire to open your heart and mind to the present moment. Session 1: What is Meditation? In this teaching, Mingyur Rinpoche explains the essence of meditation, showing how we can use any experience as a support for awareness. Session 2: Exploring Awareness with the Breath Mingyur Rinpoche teaches a simple, yet powerful meditation technique that involves letting awareness rest on the movements of the breath. Session 3: The Breath and Open Awareness Building on the previous session, here Mingyur Rinpoche shows how we can use the breath to relax the mind into a state of open, spacious awareness. Session 4: Recognizing Awareness As Mingyur Rinpoche explains in this teaching, meditation is a process of discovery, in which we recognize that true happiness can be found within awareness itself.


Compare

In meditation, we explore the landscape of our experience with mindful awareness. What we discover is a true and lasting happiness that does not depend on the outer conditions of our lives. In this four-part series, Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche will take you step-by-step through the process of starting a meditation practice. It's not as hard as you think. All you need is a sinc In meditation, we explore the landscape of our experience with mindful awareness. What we discover is a true and lasting happiness that does not depend on the outer conditions of our lives. In this four-part series, Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche will take you step-by-step through the process of starting a meditation practice. It's not as hard as you think. All you need is a sincere desire to open your heart and mind to the present moment. Session 1: What is Meditation? In this teaching, Mingyur Rinpoche explains the essence of meditation, showing how we can use any experience as a support for awareness. Session 2: Exploring Awareness with the Breath Mingyur Rinpoche teaches a simple, yet powerful meditation technique that involves letting awareness rest on the movements of the breath. Session 3: The Breath and Open Awareness Building on the previous session, here Mingyur Rinpoche shows how we can use the breath to relax the mind into a state of open, spacious awareness. Session 4: Recognizing Awareness As Mingyur Rinpoche explains in this teaching, meditation is a process of discovery, in which we recognize that true happiness can be found within awareness itself.

30 review for An Introduction to Meditation with Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche (Joy of Living Video Series)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    It's kind of random how I came across this book - I had never heard of it before in spite of its best seller status. I know I've hinted before that I'm going through some big things in my personal life, so I'm sure this genre of book makes sense in that respect, but the biggest thing that lead me to this book is that my husband has really gotten into Buddhism lately and I wanted to be able to keep up with him so I searched my library catalog for "Buddhism" and perused the selection. I narrowed t It's kind of random how I came across this book - I had never heard of it before in spite of its best seller status. I know I've hinted before that I'm going through some big things in my personal life, so I'm sure this genre of book makes sense in that respect, but the biggest thing that lead me to this book is that my husband has really gotten into Buddhism lately and I wanted to be able to keep up with him so I searched my library catalog for "Buddhism" and perused the selection. I narrowed things down to what audiobooks were available (realistically I am driving so much that audiobooks are my best option to read right now), and this was first on the list that looked good to me. I'm glad to report that this blind picking method worked out well this time :) Joyful Wisdom is what I like to summarize (loosely) as a practical guide to Buddhist meditation. The author is a monk from Nepal who travels around the world and teaches these basics. The book is broken down into 3 main sections: Principles, Experience, and Application. He covers the basic thought and history behind Buddhism first, moving onto what those basics mean in your own life, and then tells you how to apply these teachings to benefit your life. He uses examples not only from ancient Buddhist texts and teachings, but also from some of his modern students and what these specific techniques did for them. In the application section, he literally breaks down how to meditate on a specific Buddhist principle with instructions such as, "Assume the 7 point position. Clear your thoughts and think about a person who you feel gratitude for. Don't ponder on it for more than a few minutes." Very practical. Very precise. He even talks about how it's ok and even needed to take breaks, and how even if we feel like we are failing because we can't clear our mind, that's actually a good thing. Basically there is no failure - a nice notion to go into things with, really. I have always been the type of person who was interested in meditation, but I just never found any explanations that made sense to me as to how to go about it. I'm not one who easily relates to metaphysical-speak like, "make friends with your fears." Seriously? What? How does one do that? The greatest thing I gained from this book is an explanation of the meditation process that actually made sense to me. It was also wonderful to learn that I am not alone or unprepared for this practice - in fact, most people feel similar to me when they can't get their head clear enough to focus on what they think they should. It's about clearing other thoughts out of the way so that you can focus on what surfaces during that clarity. If that thought bubbles up to the top, obviously it is at the forefront of your mind and needs your attention. I've never had such a rational sounding break down of meditation before. I fully believe that anyone who is interested in meditation, whether you've tried it and felt like you couldn't do it, or if you're like me and have never fully tried because it never made sense, this book is what you need. There is so much information in here that I'm sure it would help even a seasoned meditator. I'm sure there is plenty more that I could say about this book, but just know that I give this book 4 out of 5 stars.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    The first book about Buddhism I would recommend is "The Art of Happiness" by the Dalai Lama. The second book is this one. The author explains how to apply Buddhist philosophy to the human problems we all deal with on a daily basis. He shows how different methods of meditation can be used to get through common problems like self-doubt and frustration with work. He clearly explains step-by-step methods and illustrates his points with stories anyone can relate to. He is good at explaining Buddhist The first book about Buddhism I would recommend is "The Art of Happiness" by the Dalai Lama. The second book is this one. The author explains how to apply Buddhist philosophy to the human problems we all deal with on a daily basis. He shows how different methods of meditation can be used to get through common problems like self-doubt and frustration with work. He clearly explains step-by-step methods and illustrates his points with stories anyone can relate to. He is good at explaining Buddhist terminology, and I liked how he acknowledged that it is natural for beginners to become bored with the practices or confused with the theories. I will definitely keep this on my iPod, because the book contains more information than I can remember from one reading. I listened to this audio book a second time, and I also bought a print copy to use as a reference book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brad Carl

    This book was way more than I bargained for or expected, but if you want to know about Buddhism this is the book to read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Egbert

    I adored this book and am buying my own copy. I listened to this one on audio and the author uses one word repeatedly that he pronounced in an odd fashion and I just desperately wanted to make notes in the book as I was listening so I am looking forward to sitting down with my own hard copy. I could seriously just copy the entire book here aas good quotes but I am just going to add the ones most profound to me. If you have a little water in ear, pour in more water and drain it all out. A illustra I adored this book and am buying my own copy. I listened to this one on audio and the author uses one word repeatedly that he pronounced in an odd fashion and I just desperately wanted to make notes in the book as I was listening so I am looking forward to sitting down with my own hard copy. I could seriously just copy the entire book here aas good quotes but I am just going to add the ones most profound to me. If you have a little water in ear, pour in more water and drain it all out. A illustration of the ancient Buddhist principle of using the problem as the anecdote. When we become fixed in our perceptions we lose our ability to fly. (killing butterflies) (The butterflies that are mounted and displayed are not really even butterflies any longer since they cannot fly.) 3 poisons = ignorance (label on the bottle of hot sauce is the hot sauce), desire (for things to bring pleasure), aversion (the pushing away of things that bring unpleasantness). I can choose how to think about myself and all the stuff happening around me. I consider myself very fortunate in fact. Some people aren't capable of choosing and some people don't recognize that they can choose. I guess I'm lucky because I fall in the category of people who are able to recognize their capacity for choice. We must find the courage to be, just as we are, right here, right now, with all our doubts and uncertainties. Story of the soldier with the poisoned arrow in his body. "Wait. Before you pull out the arrow I need to know..." All of his ridiculous questions. By the time the doctor learned the answer to everything the soldier was dead. This is an example of self created suffering, the kind of intellectual overlay that inhibits us from dealing with painful situations simply and directly. The moral of the story is to let go if the search for reasons, blame, or stories and simply look at the experience directly. Extract the poison arrow of pain right now and ask questions later or even never. Once the arrow is removed the questions are irrelevant. Cultivate lovingkindnesscompassion. Meditation isn't something separate from your life, it is your life When we  take the time to look at the way we see things, the way we see things changes. Self awareness is a neutral mode that maintains self-reflectiveness even in the midst of turbulent emotions. -Daniel Goldman Emotional Intelligence. Every technique of Buddhist meditation ultimately generates compassion. Whenever you look at your mind you can't help but recognize your similarity to those around you. When you see your own desire to be happy you can't avoid seeing the same desire in others. And when you look clearly at your own fear, anger, or aversion you can't help but see that everyone around you feels the same fear, anger, and aversion. This is wisdom, not in the sense of book learning but in the awakening of the heart, the recognition of our connection to others and the road to joy.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey

    Kind introduction to many key concepts and practices in Buddhist mindfulness meditation (e.g. Four Noble Truths, awareness, insight, empathy). As the author succinctly puts it at the end of the book, “joyful wisdom comes down to choosing between the discomfort of becoming aware of your mental afflictions and the discomfort of being ruled by them.” (p. 268)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Diana Shaffner

    What a wonderful book! Joyful Wisdom, who cannot use a dose of that?! In this book the author who sometimes describes himself as a 'happy little monk' starts out telling about his childhood struggles with intense anxiety that caused him problems well into his young adult years. He dealt with these difficulties despite having a loving home and a famous master of meditation as a father. While this book is full of wisdom, the perhaps most powerful one standing out is the one on impermanence. Nothin What a wonderful book! Joyful Wisdom, who cannot use a dose of that?! In this book the author who sometimes describes himself as a 'happy little monk' starts out telling about his childhood struggles with intense anxiety that caused him problems well into his young adult years. He dealt with these difficulties despite having a loving home and a famous master of meditation as a father. While this book is full of wisdom, the perhaps most powerful one standing out is the one on impermanence. Nothing is permanent. Everything is in flux and will be gone one day to be replaced by something else impermanent. Wenn we cling to the idea of wanting things to stay the same, we create suffering for ourselves. In not clinging to anything we set ourselves free.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dinda

    I gave it 5 stars because this book sparked so many conversations. Some tough and complicated ones. I thought this book was kind of self help book, but it turned out to be ‘very Buddhis’. It’s About the concept of buddhist teachings such as mindfulness and how to practice meditation. It’s very interesting for me. I might not be able to undestand it fully now - i really need to reread it again - but i got many ideas. I think that what makes a good book!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Whitaker

    A really great book shows us how everything is great and worth to die for

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anastasiya Mozgovaya

    a must-read! it is impossible to prevent change from happening, but it is possible to prepare yourself. an extremely nurturing book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nikky3

    Very relatable and has some good life advice even if you are not interested in religion.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bob Woodley

    This is an introduction to Buddhist meditation, but since the author is so highly trained there are tidbits and perspectives that are not usually found in introductory texts. I learned more than I expected. Mingyur's personal narratives are particularly enjoyable since his upbringing was so unusual. I hope someday he writes an auto-biography. He speaks in a contemporary voice that will be easy and natural for most readers. He voice is refreshing and modern compared to the tone used by the writers This is an introduction to Buddhist meditation, but since the author is so highly trained there are tidbits and perspectives that are not usually found in introductory texts. I learned more than I expected. Mingyur's personal narratives are particularly enjoyable since his upbringing was so unusual. I hope someday he writes an auto-biography. He speaks in a contemporary voice that will be easy and natural for most readers. He voice is refreshing and modern compared to the tone used by the writers of the post-hippie generation in 70s, 80s and 90s. When Buddhism came to the west, it was appropriated quite quickly by psychologists, and there is a lot of psychology in this text. I have mixed feelings about this. It might help some people short-term, but neglecting the root principals means any results are temporary. I read this on a Kindle, which was a mistake. Mingyur Rinpoche has given a lot of thought to the structure of this book and how it is organized, but if you can't flip around in the text, that organization is not so evident.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chetan

    Is it just me or does this book lack a purpose? Many things are said and I don't feel like we stay on the subject long enough. Is it just me or does this book lack a purpose? Many things are said and I don't feel like we stay on the subject long enough.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Turner

    It's been a long time since I have read a book on Buddhism and it was overdue. It's nice to get some perspective on modern day living from time to time. I had previously read a book by his holiness, the Dali Lama and I felt that I had a strong sense of what each of the four Noble Truths of Buddhism were after finishing his book. This book wasn't as concrete on what they were. I couldn't decide if that was a good or bad thing. The very fact that the author is more vague than the Dali Lama makes It's been a long time since I have read a book on Buddhism and it was overdue. It's nice to get some perspective on modern day living from time to time. I had previously read a book by his holiness, the Dali Lama and I felt that I had a strong sense of what each of the four Noble Truths of Buddhism were after finishing his book. This book wasn't as concrete on what they were. I couldn't decide if that was a good or bad thing. The very fact that the author is more vague than the Dali Lama makes you think more about what exactly each noble truth is. In some ways that is a very good thing. The first noble truth is that the nature of life is suffering. There is more to it than that, but that is the essence of the thing. The other truths are a bit more vague. You would have to read the book to probably put it in your own terms. I found myself looking up Tibetan or Sanskrit words that I was not 100% clear on. After I finished the book I noticed a glossary at the back and read that also. I noticed several definitions of words that I had looked up online were not the same definitions as I found in the back of the book. I think many things were slightly different compared to my previous experiences reading up on this topic. My assumption is that some of this is language barrier. However, there is an English co-author named Eric Swanson for this book so it can't all be the language. I still think you get the essence of the tenets of Tibetan Buddhism and if you are somewhat like me and think you have some small understanding of what they may be already, this book may force you to look at what you think you already know in a different light. It's all about perspective. The final thing I wish to share about my experience reading this book is how it may have effected my personal life at the time without me even knowing it. I was about halfway through the book when I became involved in a disagreement with someone I know via text message. This person had no idea what I was reading but at some point in the conversation sent me an angry text that said, "Fuck you and your fortune cookie wisdom!" This bothered me for about twenty minutes but after awhile I found the response rather amusing. A part of me wished that I could have said that to someone. A great response. That could be a line in a movie. I can't tell you that I resolved this issue quickly. The person in question remained angry at me for weeks because of what I said to them. I think it is safe to say that I have a long way to go to reach my own Buddha nature. However, I do not regret expressing my thoughts and feelings honestly and can't deny that to get a response like that from someone this book must have had some effect on my day to day life. I would like to believe a positive one, however trying to prove you have wisdom by listing an example of someone telling you to fuck off is not wise. Or is it? Meditate on that.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Adolfo

    This book was an in deep text about what is taught with words about Zen philosophy and meditation in a Buddhist temple in São Paulo. Although there are things that I personally don't agree, the book covered the subject clearly and deep enough. This book was an in deep text about what is taught with words about Zen philosophy and meditation in a Buddhist temple in São Paulo. Although there are things that I personally don't agree, the book covered the subject clearly and deep enough.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bryce Holt

    Even excellent books can catch you at the wrong time. This was a good book (I listened to the audiobook, FYI), but I think the messages were sadly lost on me. The messages of detaching oneself from fear, desire and those things that hold you back from living life as it should be lived...I just can't do it right now. I can't just breathe out the stress; can't detach myself from my work. It's sad to recognize that what this monk is telling me I need to do to "find freedom" is the very thing I just Even excellent books can catch you at the wrong time. This was a good book (I listened to the audiobook, FYI), but I think the messages were sadly lost on me. The messages of detaching oneself from fear, desire and those things that hold you back from living life as it should be lived...I just can't do it right now. I can't just breathe out the stress; can't detach myself from my work. It's sad to recognize that what this monk is telling me I need to do to "find freedom" is the very thing I just cannot do right this moment. Trying to put into practice what he was advising ended up only making me feel more overwhelmed, frustrated and lost. And the more I pushed myself, the more I felt anger rather than peace coming to the surface. Something that seemingly used to come so easily to me, it is as if I won't allow myself to find peace. Still, this is my problem, not the book's. Yongey Mingyur's somewhat simple principles can be applied anytime to anyone, and given they are willing to relinquish what holds them captive (I just couldn't...), I could see this being a very powerful piece. I hope to revisit it in a year or two, and perhaps being open enough then to discover its riches because there are riches here. If you are just getting into Buddhism, I'd go with Siddhartha or a book from the Dalai Lama to start with (the same way I would suggest starting with Bill Bryson's "A Short History of Everything" if you were wanting to dip your toes into an adult look at science for the first time), but this isn't too far of a leap from those subtly simple masters. I just hope that, when you come across this, your heart, mind, body and soul are more open than mine were so you get the full experience.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas

    So far, the book is living up to its title. For example, pg. 84, "Now, peeing may not be anyone's idea of an enlightening experience, but I can tell you that once I empty my bladder, I recognize that the deep sense of relief I feel in that moment is a good analogy for the Third Noble Truth: that relief was with me all the time as what you might call a basic condition. I just didn't recognize it because it was temporarily obscured by all that water. But afterwards, I was able to recognize it and So far, the book is living up to its title. For example, pg. 84, "Now, peeing may not be anyone's idea of an enlightening experience, but I can tell you that once I empty my bladder, I recognize that the deep sense of relief I feel in that moment is a good analogy for the Third Noble Truth: that relief was with me all the time as what you might call a basic condition. I just didn't recognize it because it was temporarily obscured by all that water. But afterwards, I was able to recognize it and appreciate it." Don't let this isolated quote misconstrue the weight/substance of this book, but allow it to convey the 'approachability' of its content/message. Almost every Dharma book unavoidably addresses the Four Noble Truths. I concede that a practitioner can never go deep enough into these fundamental teachings, but it becomes quite a skill for an author to explain them in an original or inspired way. Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche does an admirable job in revisiting the Noble Truths and illuminating them with his experiences.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    This was my first time learning some of the concepts of Buddism and I was really happy with this introduction. A wonderful look at the basic of this ideology with great step by step procedures for getting started. I loved all the examples Yongey Mingyur uses from people's real lives and the way things were broken down for easier understanding. My first complaint is that it is a bit repetitive in the middle and I found myself losing interest, but the last few chapters made up for it. The other co This was my first time learning some of the concepts of Buddism and I was really happy with this introduction. A wonderful look at the basic of this ideology with great step by step procedures for getting started. I loved all the examples Yongey Mingyur uses from people's real lives and the way things were broken down for easier understanding. My first complaint is that it is a bit repetitive in the middle and I found myself losing interest, but the last few chapters made up for it. The other complaint I have is the lack of science which I feel is overly emphasized in the reviews for this book on the back cover. While the science is there and I really didn't expect high levels of sciences in an introduction to an ancient ideology, the back cover raised my expectations. However, those two statements are minor complaints and the book really is an amazing introduction to the world of Buddhist thinking. I will definitely recommend this book to others and look for other works by this author.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. "consider the impermanent aspect of emotion. When we identify an emotion -- whether it's self hatred, loneliness, a feeling of awkwardness in social situations or a judgment against another person -- we tend to think of it as a big, solid problem. A sense of permanence surrounds and infuses the feeling. I will always feel this way. I'm a loser. That person really is bad. Buddha Nature Blocker number three plays a prominent role here, enforcing a sense of endurability. But when we carefully exami "consider the impermanent aspect of emotion. When we identify an emotion -- whether it's self hatred, loneliness, a feeling of awkwardness in social situations or a judgment against another person -- we tend to think of it as a big, solid problem. A sense of permanence surrounds and infuses the feeling. I will always feel this way. I'm a loser. That person really is bad. Buddha Nature Blocker number three plays a prominent role here, enforcing a sense of endurability. But when we carefully examine such feelings, we find they're not stable or enduring at all. In a minute or less the thoughts associated with them change, the intensity wavers. Physical sensations -- body temperature, heartbeat, heaviness in the limbs, fatigue, or agitation -- are apt to shift."

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cole

    I'd like to write a quick review: I read this after finishing "The Joy of Living." My friend swapped these books with me. I don't identify as a Buddhist, but I will say that much of his teachings and stories are uplifting and inspire me to cultivate a sense of stability in my life and compassion towards all beings. Yongey Mingyur alludes to his childhood, when he was filled with anxiety. I relate to this well, as I too have experienced anxiety in the middle portion of my life. Stylistically, his I'd like to write a quick review: I read this after finishing "The Joy of Living." My friend swapped these books with me. I don't identify as a Buddhist, but I will say that much of his teachings and stories are uplifting and inspire me to cultivate a sense of stability in my life and compassion towards all beings. Yongey Mingyur alludes to his childhood, when he was filled with anxiety. I relate to this well, as I too have experienced anxiety in the middle portion of my life. Stylistically, his writing is simple but is full of wisdom. I especially enjoyed the stories and experiences he shared to make sense of points he was trying to make. I gave this five stars because I gained a lot from it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Happyreader

    A kind, gentle, and practical approach to developing awareness, insight, and empathy. I appreciated his approach to breaking down difficult mind states into smaller, easier-to-deal-with units and his caution to not overdo and to change up your practice to keep it fresh and relevant. His techniques and analogies are accessible such as his observation that the increased arising of difficult emotions can be a sign that your practice is progressing, like a dirty dish soaking in water. While the dish A kind, gentle, and practical approach to developing awareness, insight, and empathy. I appreciated his approach to breaking down difficult mind states into smaller, easier-to-deal-with units and his caution to not overdo and to change up your practice to keep it fresh and relevant. His techniques and analogies are accessible such as his observation that the increased arising of difficult emotions can be a sign that your practice is progressing, like a dirty dish soaking in water. While the dish appears messier, it's all the dried-on, stuck food dissolving, making it easier to clean the dish. A great book for beginners and non-beginners.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tenzin Tsokey

    I find this book a testament of Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche's personel practices and insights into meditation and Buddhist science. I am sure he has done really amazing job by writing this book for thousands of readers knowingly or unknowingly hunting for such book long times back. Infact, it took me for awhile to read this book easily because I can not turn to next page to next without giving a thoughts to a particular page that I had read, as almost every single pages in the book demanding your no I find this book a testament of Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche's personel practices and insights into meditation and Buddhist science. I am sure he has done really amazing job by writing this book for thousands of readers knowingly or unknowingly hunting for such book long times back. Infact, it took me for awhile to read this book easily because I can not turn to next page to next without giving a thoughts to a particular page that I had read, as almost every single pages in the book demanding your not only concentration to read but your deeper sense and practical into it. This is thought-provoking book!!!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Carpenito

    This was a truly great read. It was insightful, it was light hearted, funny, and powerful. I learned things from it, I laughed a lot reading it, and I felt like following the lessons in it would really make me a more complete person, more able to help others find their way. At not point did I feel compelled to finish this book, you can read it, put it down for a month, and start again, and nothing is lost. It feels like listening to an old friend speak to you, not like being preached to or taug This was a truly great read. It was insightful, it was light hearted, funny, and powerful. I learned things from it, I laughed a lot reading it, and I felt like following the lessons in it would really make me a more complete person, more able to help others find their way. At not point did I feel compelled to finish this book, you can read it, put it down for a month, and start again, and nothing is lost. It feels like listening to an old friend speak to you, not like being preached to or taught. Everyone should read this book, or at least read some of it, we all have something to learn from this man.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rif A. Saurous

    A fine addition to the Buddhist canon. A mix of philosophy and semi-practical instruction. I especially appreciated Mingyur's perspective, his discussions of his own struggles and what he still struggles with. Compared to some of the more westernized books, Mingyur focuses more on using meditation and self-examination to make immediate incremental improvements to your life, and less on a binary enlightened vs. not enlightened or awake vs. not awake perspective. While I find myself wanting to beli A fine addition to the Buddhist canon. A mix of philosophy and semi-practical instruction. I especially appreciated Mingyur's perspective, his discussions of his own struggles and what he still struggles with. Compared to some of the more westernized books, Mingyur focuses more on using meditation and self-examination to make immediate incremental improvements to your life, and less on a binary enlightened vs. not enlightened or awake vs. not awake perspective. While I find myself wanting to believe in eventual instant full enlightenment, Mingyur's view seems more realistic to me based on what I've experienced so far, and perhaps more hopeful.

  24. 5 out of 5

    arkan

    Pretty hard to judge this one unbiased since Mingyur Rinpoche is my favorite author and teacher. I watch a lot of his free videos on YouTube and even those are pretty helpful. What I find very useful from this book is that it can serve as a meditation guide for a long time. Granted, many other books on Buddhism are the same way, but Rinpoche's teachings are ones I find that resonates most easily with me. Like many other books on meditation this one would be better served with more theoretical expl Pretty hard to judge this one unbiased since Mingyur Rinpoche is my favorite author and teacher. I watch a lot of his free videos on YouTube and even those are pretty helpful. What I find very useful from this book is that it can serve as a meditation guide for a long time. Granted, many other books on Buddhism are the same way, but Rinpoche's teachings are ones I find that resonates most easily with me. Like many other books on meditation this one would be better served with more theoretical explanations. However, I do understand that meditation is in large part about practice, not just the intellectual understanding of it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kiravanessa

    As a student of Mingyur Rinpoche, I am thrilled that his new book, JOYFUL WISDOM, is coming out soon! Much needed in this 'age of anxiety!' Rinpoche shows us how to embrace change and find freedom within - JOYFUL WISDOM is filled with new shamatha and vipassana practices and concludes with loving-kindness/compassion techniques. The final section suggests ways to apply each of these practices more skillfully. Rinpoche teaches with warmth, compassion, wisdom, and joy - his teachings are great for t As a student of Mingyur Rinpoche, I am thrilled that his new book, JOYFUL WISDOM, is coming out soon! Much needed in this 'age of anxiety!' Rinpoche shows us how to embrace change and find freedom within - JOYFUL WISDOM is filled with new shamatha and vipassana practices and concludes with loving-kindness/compassion techniques. The final section suggests ways to apply each of these practices more skillfully. Rinpoche teaches with warmth, compassion, wisdom, and joy - his teachings are great for those who are new to Buddhism and those who have been practicing for a long time.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    This is definitely the best book of buddhist practice I have read (and I've read a few). Clear and concise explanations of the theory and practice of meditation. If you have not teacher or school, this is as good a guide as you will find until such time as you connects with a teacher or sangha where you can receive some individual guidance. Yongey Minhyur draws from his tradition, his personal learnings and Western neuroscience to help us become more acquainted with our minds and relationships w This is definitely the best book of buddhist practice I have read (and I've read a few). Clear and concise explanations of the theory and practice of meditation. If you have not teacher or school, this is as good a guide as you will find until such time as you connects with a teacher or sangha where you can receive some individual guidance. Yongey Minhyur draws from his tradition, his personal learnings and Western neuroscience to help us become more acquainted with our minds and relationships with others.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Maggi Scott

    This and the Joy of Living Book are an excellent clear introduction to Buddhist meditation coupled with the context of current physics and other science understandings of matter, particulalrly quantum theory, and that the smaller and smaller we divide things, they are never finished, so it is with conciousness. Excellent practices, using our senses, an object, breath etc. He is probably the funniest teacher and understands the Western mind in how to explain complex ideas v simply, he understands This and the Joy of Living Book are an excellent clear introduction to Buddhist meditation coupled with the context of current physics and other science understandings of matter, particulalrly quantum theory, and that the smaller and smaller we divide things, they are never finished, so it is with conciousness. Excellent practices, using our senses, an object, breath etc. He is probably the funniest teacher and understands the Western mind in how to explain complex ideas v simply, he understands science very well and takes part in the Mind and Life Institute research and conferences.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Virginia Lambing

    I love this book, and lend it to everyone I can convince to read it. It makes you question your thought processes and patterns, and encourages meditation as a way to 'calm' the mind. This book puts everything in life (the little stressors to the big challenges) in perspective, from a Buddhist point of view. Definitely read if you're even remotely interested in Tibetan Buddhism, philosophy, or stress-management. I love this book, and lend it to everyone I can convince to read it. It makes you question your thought processes and patterns, and encourages meditation as a way to 'calm' the mind. This book puts everything in life (the little stressors to the big challenges) in perspective, from a Buddhist point of view. Definitely read if you're even remotely interested in Tibetan Buddhism, philosophy, or stress-management.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Fred Chamberlain

    This is a solid and engaging book that explains the practical aspects of Buddhism without beating readers over the head with the spiritual aspects of it that eventually drove it to become a religion. I often smile when I consider how much cognitive behavioral theory mirrors Buddhist practice. A great read for anyone. Whether you are knowledgeable of the practice or curious, this book is grounded in entertaining and useful analogies and stories to reinforce points.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Quynh Anh

    This book may be easy to read for a Buddhist or for a person who has read many Buddhist books. Yet, I gave it a 5 stars due to the way it's structured and written. Anyone can read it and I think anyone can find many useful things that can be applied into every day Buddhist practice. This is perhaps the book with a lot of useful practice of meditation I have encountered among many Buddhist books that I read. This book may be easy to read for a Buddhist or for a person who has read many Buddhist books. Yet, I gave it a 5 stars due to the way it's structured and written. Anyone can read it and I think anyone can find many useful things that can be applied into every day Buddhist practice. This is perhaps the book with a lot of useful practice of meditation I have encountered among many Buddhist books that I read.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.