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Gotta get me some of that New Marketing. Bring me blogs, e-mail, YouTube videos, MySpace pages, Google AdWords . . . I don't care, as long as it's shiny and new. Wait. According to bestselling author Seth Godin, all these tactics are like the toppings at an ice cream parlor. If you start with ice cream, adding cherries and hot fudge and whipped cream will make it taste grea Gotta get me some of that New Marketing. Bring me blogs, e-mail, YouTube videos, MySpace pages, Google AdWords . . . I don't care, as long as it's shiny and new. Wait. According to bestselling author Seth Godin, all these tactics are like the toppings at an ice cream parlor. If you start with ice cream, adding cherries and hot fudge and whipped cream will make it taste great. But if you start with a bowl of meatballs . . . yuck! As traditional marketing fades away, the new tools seem irresistible. But they don't work as well for boring brands (meatballs) that might still be profitable but don't attract word of mouth, such as Cheerios, Ford trucks, Barbie dolls, or Budweiser. When Anheuser-Busch spends $40 million on an online network called BudTV, that's a meatball sundae. It leads to no new Bud drinkers, just a bad case of indigestion. Meatball Sundae is the definitive guide to the fourteen trends no marketer can afford to ignore. It explains what to do about the increasing power of stories, not facts; about shorter and shorter attention spans; and about the new math that says five thousand people who want to hear your message are more valuable than five million who don't. The winners aren't just annoying start-ups run by three teenagers who never had a real job. You'll also meet older companies that have adapted brilliantly, such as Blendtec, a thirty-year-old blender maker. It now produces Will it blend? videos that demolish golf balls, Coke cans, iPhones, and much more. For a few hundred dollars, Blendtec reached more than ten million eager viewers on YouTube. Godin doesn't pretend that it's easy to get your products, marketing messages, and internal systems in sync. But he'll convince you that it's worth the effort.


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Gotta get me some of that New Marketing. Bring me blogs, e-mail, YouTube videos, MySpace pages, Google AdWords . . . I don't care, as long as it's shiny and new. Wait. According to bestselling author Seth Godin, all these tactics are like the toppings at an ice cream parlor. If you start with ice cream, adding cherries and hot fudge and whipped cream will make it taste grea Gotta get me some of that New Marketing. Bring me blogs, e-mail, YouTube videos, MySpace pages, Google AdWords . . . I don't care, as long as it's shiny and new. Wait. According to bestselling author Seth Godin, all these tactics are like the toppings at an ice cream parlor. If you start with ice cream, adding cherries and hot fudge and whipped cream will make it taste great. But if you start with a bowl of meatballs . . . yuck! As traditional marketing fades away, the new tools seem irresistible. But they don't work as well for boring brands (meatballs) that might still be profitable but don't attract word of mouth, such as Cheerios, Ford trucks, Barbie dolls, or Budweiser. When Anheuser-Busch spends $40 million on an online network called BudTV, that's a meatball sundae. It leads to no new Bud drinkers, just a bad case of indigestion. Meatball Sundae is the definitive guide to the fourteen trends no marketer can afford to ignore. It explains what to do about the increasing power of stories, not facts; about shorter and shorter attention spans; and about the new math that says five thousand people who want to hear your message are more valuable than five million who don't. The winners aren't just annoying start-ups run by three teenagers who never had a real job. You'll also meet older companies that have adapted brilliantly, such as Blendtec, a thirty-year-old blender maker. It now produces Will it blend? videos that demolish golf balls, Coke cans, iPhones, and much more. For a few hundred dollars, Blendtec reached more than ten million eager viewers on YouTube. Godin doesn't pretend that it's easy to get your products, marketing messages, and internal systems in sync. But he'll convince you that it's worth the effort.

30 review for Meatball Sundae: Is Your Marketing Out of Sync?

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    New Marketing=blogs, YouTube, social networking, stellar customer service, word of mouth, niche products that may be customizable, customers seek out product because they want it Old Marketing=tv and magazine ads, appealing to the larger population, direct mail and spam, interruptions, a growing poor return on investment I’ve noticed that the company I work is hesitant (perhaps as strong as resistant) to embrace new marketing, small trials, ideas that might appeal to a smaller segment of the popul New Marketing=blogs, YouTube, social networking, stellar customer service, word of mouth, niche products that may be customizable, customers seek out product because they want it Old Marketing=tv and magazine ads, appealing to the larger population, direct mail and spam, interruptions, a growing poor return on investment I’ve noticed that the company I work is hesitant (perhaps as strong as resistant) to embrace new marketing, small trials, ideas that might appeal to a smaller segment of the population, but might still sell. Perhaps shortsighted but perhaps they’ll come around... Well worth the read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michele Amitrani

    Seth did it again. A short but sweet book capable of revolutionizing everything you thought was true (and that is not). Regardless of its now more than 10 years of life, this book's teaching are incredibly current (maybe more so now than a decade ago). The book is about the concept of the New Marketing VS the concept of the Meatball Marketing and how does this shift will influence influencers and normal people alike. A generous book from a generous person who seems to always know what to say, and Seth did it again. A short but sweet book capable of revolutionizing everything you thought was true (and that is not). Regardless of its now more than 10 years of life, this book's teaching are incredibly current (maybe more so now than a decade ago). The book is about the concept of the New Marketing VS the concept of the Meatball Marketing and how does this shift will influence influencers and normal people alike. A generous book from a generous person who seems to always know what to say, and how to say it. Remarkably mind-blowing. As always.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alice Osborn

    guestpost by Dave Baldwin Seth Godin in Meatball Sundae asserts that the market demands an ontological shift in the core of a business culture if that business is to grow and adapt. In the relentlessly-changing Web 2.0 environment where an infinitude of shiny choices abound and the short attention span is king, says Godin, an organization must re-align itself from the inside out. Godin cites numerous examples of business that created not only new products and services to fit the market, but new m guestpost by Dave Baldwin Seth Godin in Meatball Sundae asserts that the market demands an ontological shift in the core of a business culture if that business is to grow and adapt. In the relentlessly-changing Web 2.0 environment where an infinitude of shiny choices abound and the short attention span is king, says Godin, an organization must re-align itself from the inside out. Godin cites numerous examples of business that created not only new products and services to fit the market, but new methods of distribution, sales, and supply chain management. In other words, marketing in the Web 2.0 world is not simply a matter of uploading a few YouTube videos and then proceeding with business as usual. It’s not Godin’s style to give direct solutions to problems or dole out patronizing step-by-step formulas. Instead, he helped me to see the real challenges I didn’t know I was facing as a solo entrepreneur more clearly and from a fresh perspective. As I read through the different stories in the book, the picture that came sharply into focus depicted a new way of doing business. I had to stop making average stuff for average people. In my case, I had to stop trying to be an average writer for an average client. Against conventional logic, I immediately abandoned my only steady income stream and set to work on what would be my first full-length book, Pied Piper Entrepreneurship. I did this because Godin had made it crystal clear that I needed to honor my core strengths and talents that made me remarkable as a human being. I saw that if I really wanted the marketplace to take my gifts seriously, I needed to start taking them seriously myself. Within days after I started to do this, the phone rang with a new project that replaced my old job in one fell swoop. It was as if the stars winked at me. That was a good day. I could fill a volume with the insights that I gleaned from reading Meatball Sundae, but I’ll just list a few here. 1. Listening to what people are saying online is 100 times more important than broadcasting information about what you’re selling. 2. Assume that someone is reading and remembering every single word you write online. 3. Stop looking for communities with the most people, and start engaging communities where the right people congregate. This applies online and offline. 4. If you’re having to work hard to get people to pay attention to something, try just doing something else instead. Meatball Sundae is a fast and fun read. Go pick up a copy today. You’ll be glad you did.

  4. 4 out of 5

    E

    Easy guide to new marketing in the new media The title of Seth Godin’s new book is an immediate tip-off that he knows how to grab your attention. This savvy marketer satiates your curiosity quickly, explaining that simply adding “New Marketing” techniques, such as podcasting or uploading viral videos, to your existing strategies works just about as well as adding meatballs to a sundae. The “meatball” in this case is a generic product sold through traditional mass-marketing tactics. Instead of add Easy guide to new marketing in the new media The title of Seth Godin’s new book is an immediate tip-off that he knows how to grab your attention. This savvy marketer satiates your curiosity quickly, explaining that simply adding “New Marketing” techniques, such as podcasting or uploading viral videos, to your existing strategies works just about as well as adding meatballs to a sundae. The “meatball” in this case is a generic product sold through traditional mass-marketing tactics. Instead of adding new marketing like a cherry on top of your current ad program, gain a true understanding of today’s evolving social marketing environment, so you can use it to the advantage of your product. Godin says companies must retool their marketing to survive, because “ideas that spread through groups of people are far more powerful than ideas delivered at an individual.” He breaks the new marketing wave into 14 trends marketers can use separately or in combination. getAbstract recommends this timely little book, which is full of case studies and examples that will help anyone who is selling an idea, product or service.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Paul Kemner

    A very good business book. It doesn't just go for the magic bullet and then tack on pages of brag and fluff. It's good for understanding a lot of current trends, and what's happening with the new marketing.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Have followed Seth's blog for a while - this is the first of his books that I've read and I'm inspired to start digging up the others. Short, opinionated guide to new media marketing loaded with insights and case studies.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Barb Terpstra

    Godin uses the analogy of a meatball sundae (disgusting), with the meatballs being the stuff people need and the toppings being new marketing strategies for his book title. I saw Seth Godin speak at Willowcreek Leadership Academy. He is more dynamic in person, but I do like his down to earth writing style. If you want to deepen your understanding of old marketing (interrupting masses of people with ads) and new marketing (leveraging short attention spans and creating interactions among communiti Godin uses the analogy of a meatball sundae (disgusting), with the meatballs being the stuff people need and the toppings being new marketing strategies for his book title. I saw Seth Godin speak at Willowcreek Leadership Academy. He is more dynamic in person, but I do like his down to earth writing style. If you want to deepen your understanding of old marketing (interrupting masses of people with ads) and new marketing (leveraging short attention spans and creating interactions among communities of people with similar interests), you'll find this book interesting and informative. Twitter, YouTube, blogging (to name just a few), are new marketing inventions that have changed the world of marketing. We have to flip our thinking--it is no longer the organization that drives your marketing strategy, but the consumer. No longer can companies carefully craft and control their advertising. This new age of advertising is "me" oriented--"incredibly targeted messaging that's about the consumer and what he wants, right now" (p. 132). It is no longer effective to market to massses of people, but rather, you can successfully market to those few people whom you know want your product through the use of Google or other site engines. As you read this book, you'll discover you are one of those "me" consumers. Do you watch commercials or read advertising emails that advertise a product you have no interest in? Or, like me, do you find the product yourself through the internet? It is very easy be a chooser consumer and I bet you became one, like me, without even knowing it! Godin summarizes the shift from mass marketing to "me" marketing in this way: "This focus on mass is understandable if you assume that all consumers are pretty much the same of if you can't tell them apart. The thing is, they aren't and you can. Now for the first time, marketers can focus on who is hearing and talking about" their message, and, they no longer use mass as a placeholder. . . Even more important: Mass is no longer desirable. Now that we can know who is coming to our Web site or store or advertising, and which ad reached them and how, we can be far more selective about what we say and why." p. 158 I work in education. It seems like educators everywhere are indulging in the use of many, if not all, of these marketing techniques. Our school is on facebook, our superintendent twitters,and I know we have posted some videos on YouTube. Godin states: "Marketing doesn't support the organization. The organization supports marketing". This implies an intentionality about the use of these new techniques that I am not sure is there. Yet, our parents have become "me" consumers, often enrolling students in multiple districts. They are willing to be on a waiting list and are pretty upfront to tell you if your school is not their first choice. How does "me" consumerism drive what we as a school or district do? Is it right for education to be driven by "me" consumerism? Education itself is in the throes of change driven by current economics and the wide open field offered to consumers with virtual schools. These questions should be at the forefront of our minds as we consider the use of any marketing techniques, but especially the new ones. Are we willing to blog, facebook or twitter and allow our customers (parents) to respond either positively or negatively? Are we willing to become vulnerable and really listen to them? Are we willing to openly and intentionally provide a blog or other feedback site to allow them to become equal partners with us in educating their children? I digress! The questions above could apply to any organization, and as you read Godin's book, you will come away with your own questions and ideas. Enjoy!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joe Cassada

    Godin has an uncanny ability to observe the market and read consumers' minds. This makes for great writing and engrossing reading, even if you're not an entrepreneur, CEO, or the designated marketing dude for your small business. Meatballs (Old Marketing style goods/companies) are not improved by merely adding Sundae toppings (New Marketing techniques/approach). There must be a fundamental overhaul of a company's goods/services/understanding to successfully leverage the New Market. This is the bo Godin has an uncanny ability to observe the market and read consumers' minds. This makes for great writing and engrossing reading, even if you're not an entrepreneur, CEO, or the designated marketing dude for your small business. Meatballs (Old Marketing style goods/companies) are not improved by merely adding Sundae toppings (New Marketing techniques/approach). There must be a fundamental overhaul of a company's goods/services/understanding to successfully leverage the New Market. This is the book's premise. I pastor a church, and I find Godin's information helpful. I recommend every pastor hear what he has to say. While I would denounce a market-driven approach to ministry, I do recognize that people who go to church operate under many of the same motivations that consumers do. I think this is unfortunate, but it is the reality. And that reality is not going to change any time soon. People who visit missionary churches in far away places do so out of curiosity or as seekers of truth; in the USA, people visit churches as customers and consumers. I wish it weren't so, but it is. Pastors need this information. I think we can successfully engage the New Market without cloning the popular seeker-drive, market-driven church models. We shouldn't conform our churches to what consumers want, but neither should we think that having a church website is enough to successfully propel us into the Age of the Internet.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    I was not a fan of Seth Godin, who has made a second career of writing polemic books about how to do marketing FROM THE OUTSIDE, and I think much of his prior work had elements of 'consulting' characterized by advice that is not grounded in the reality and exigency of actually running a marketing operation and generating profitable sales. After all, this is the primary job of marketing, and without that grounding, Seth wrote books that were more polemic and wishful (e.g. purple cow, permission m I was not a fan of Seth Godin, who has made a second career of writing polemic books about how to do marketing FROM THE OUTSIDE, and I think much of his prior work had elements of 'consulting' characterized by advice that is not grounded in the reality and exigency of actually running a marketing operation and generating profitable sales. After all, this is the primary job of marketing, and without that grounding, Seth wrote books that were more polemic and wishful (e.g. purple cow, permission marketing) than useful or impactful. This book is different and I think shows a maturation in Seth's work where he is now more comfortable speaking about general market trends and forwarding a significant thesis about how e-commerce is continuing to re-shape not just the tactical business landscape, but the also strategic landscape for B2B and B2C companies in 2008. No longer can marketing merely represent a product, but Marketing must have a hand in creating the product as well as the attributes. I think Seth argues compellingly that these 14 trends he cites are part of a legitimate movement in the economy that is going to be affecting the future of commerce. If you're in a position to influence product development, user interfaces, business strategy, marketing, or sales: Ignore this little easy reading book at your peril.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dane Cobain

    Seth Godin is back again with yet another fantastic marketing manual, a book which will change the way you think about the new technologies that we’re all talking about and which increasingly dominate our lives. According to Godin, meatballs are the staples, the things that people need like toothpaste and washing powder – the old products and services that used to be easily sold through mass-market advertisements. Meanwhile, the sundae is the new layers of technology that the internet has made p Seth Godin is back again with yet another fantastic marketing manual, a book which will change the way you think about the new technologies that we’re all talking about and which increasingly dominate our lives. According to Godin, meatballs are the staples, the things that people need like toothpaste and washing powder – the old products and services that used to be easily sold through mass-market advertisements. Meanwhile, the sundae is the new layers of technology that the internet has made possible – delicious on their own, but they don’t go well with meatballs. This, then, is Godin’s guide to using these new social networks – really, though, it doesn’t matter how you try to sell your product if the product itself isn’t right, and that’s the main gist of Godin’s book. What is a let down, though, is that there’s nothing to mark this book apart from any of Godin’s other work – all of his books fit together like pieces in a giant jigsaw, and while you should read this because you should read all of his books, it’s not as much of a barnstormer as Permission Marketing or Tribes. Simply put, the ‘meatball sundae’ isn’t the strongest concept, which is a shame – still, there’s lots to be learned from the king of modern marketing.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Christian Jespersen

    I may or may not be the right person to review any Seth Godin books, because I simply love what he is doing, and so my opinion my be distorted by my fascination of him. But the interesting reason why I love his work, is because I finished my master in late 2013, having studied marketing. Yet, many of the thoughts Godin bring to the table, were never introduced in the courses I had. I find that both interesting and very disturbing, considering his status within in the field. The book, Meatball Sund I may or may not be the right person to review any Seth Godin books, because I simply love what he is doing, and so my opinion my be distorted by my fascination of him. But the interesting reason why I love his work, is because I finished my master in late 2013, having studied marketing. Yet, many of the thoughts Godin bring to the table, were never introduced in the courses I had. I find that both interesting and very disturbing, considering his status within in the field. The book, Meatball Sundae, can easily be seen as another Purple Cow book. It focuses on that companies should be doing something different, and stop doing marketing like they used to. And though that sound simple and obvious, almost every company IS stuck doing the old, traditional marketing. This is not to say that every company should fall to their kness and kowtow to every word uttered by mr. Godin. But they’d do smart to read it, and at least challenge the way the do business, with the examples from his books, which clearly works. Conclusion: This is only my third Godin book, but as a marketeer I can only recommend this book. It is is short, easily read, entertaining and educational. I look forward to read the next of his books.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Khuram Malik

    Traditional marketing was about creating average products for average people and then shouting as loud as possible to sell to the masses. The new marketing revolution is about creating the best products, telling a story and letting the enthusiast find his way to you. But adopting the new marketing rules requires a fundamental change in the organisational rules of your company. Your marketing has to be in sync with your product development. Just like the industrial revolution did away with the local Traditional marketing was about creating average products for average people and then shouting as loud as possible to sell to the masses. The new marketing revolution is about creating the best products, telling a story and letting the enthusiast find his way to you. But adopting the new marketing rules requires a fundamental change in the organisational rules of your company. Your marketing has to be in sync with your product development. Just like the industrial revolution did away with the local blacksmith, if organisations now continue to use the old methods of interrupting people through Tv,Radio and Direct mail and email spam, they will be washed away with companies that do understand the new consumer. I think this book should be the ultimate starting point for someone who is interested in learning what marketing should be all about, and Seth Godin has an excellent narrative style that really makes you think about change. I couldnt put the book down when i read part I, which explains the difference between the old style of marketing and the new. Part II was a little confusing in places, but it still listed brilliant action steps, and part III was a nice round-up.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I'm not in the marketing business per se, but part of my job as a librarian is to determine what our users need, develop resources and services that help them succeed, and communicate the library's value to its patrons. While Godin focuses his examples on the business world, the information in this book should be understood by any 21st century organization. In the context of libraries, it's no longer enough to offer 20th century services and hope that a dazzling social media campaign will drum u I'm not in the marketing business per se, but part of my job as a librarian is to determine what our users need, develop resources and services that help them succeed, and communicate the library's value to its patrons. While Godin focuses his examples on the business world, the information in this book should be understood by any 21st century organization. In the context of libraries, it's no longer enough to offer 20th century services and hope that a dazzling social media campaign will drum up business. After reading this book, I better understand that we need to focus less on marketing and more on services -- developing innovative, useful ideas that respond directly to the suggestions, complaints, and needs of our users. I'm looking forward to reading more of Godin's work as I think through academic library outreach methods.

  14. 5 out of 5

    April Brown

    What ages would I recommend it too? – Seventeen and up. Length? – Most of a day’s read. Characters? – Not really. Setting? – Marketing information. Written approximately? – 2007. Does the story leave questions in the readers mind? – More up to date info on my choice of online only career. Any issues the author (or a more recent publisher) should cover? An update would be nice. Short storyline: A discussion of old and not so old marketing advice. Notes for the reader: This a bit dated at this point. It What ages would I recommend it too? – Seventeen and up. Length? – Most of a day’s read. Characters? – Not really. Setting? – Marketing information. Written approximately? – 2007. Does the story leave questions in the readers mind? – More up to date info on my choice of online only career. Any issues the author (or a more recent publisher) should cover? An update would be nice. Short storyline: A discussion of old and not so old marketing advice. Notes for the reader: This a bit dated at this point. It didn't give any specifics for figuring out how to use these ideas. The one point that really bothered me was when he said investing $5,000 was pocket change. That was my annual income for most of the last ten years I was able to work. Hardly pocket change. It seems kind of unreal in expectations. And leaves much as a guessing game.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paul Deveaux

    This book is a bit dated but at the core it is very fundamentally sound. This book is more than just about marketing. It really delves into the changes that internet technology and web 2.0 have had on business. Godin brings forth many of the ideas that those familiar with authenticity will be familiar with: authenticity, scale, consumer to consumer communication, etc. This is a great reference for someone who wants to re-create their company in light of the internet age. I would make it required This book is a bit dated but at the core it is very fundamentally sound. This book is more than just about marketing. It really delves into the changes that internet technology and web 2.0 have had on business. Godin brings forth many of the ideas that those familiar with authenticity will be familiar with: authenticity, scale, consumer to consumer communication, etc. This is a great reference for someone who wants to re-create their company in light of the internet age. I would make it required reading for any MBA or business student. This book and its ideas are the cornerstone of the shift that is continuing to make conventional media a less useful tool for getting people to buy your product or service. Highly recommended.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Bain

    My boss bought this book for a group that would be meeting to promote a new product at work. Meatball Sundae is based around a few ideas that are presented differently in each chapter that, if applied correctly, has the capability to help you grow your business. Marketing has changed and products that would never have been able to sell before, are capable of being profitable. After reading this book I felt truly encouraged that I could grow our business in cheaper and more effective ways than eve My boss bought this book for a group that would be meeting to promote a new product at work. Meatball Sundae is based around a few ideas that are presented differently in each chapter that, if applied correctly, has the capability to help you grow your business. Marketing has changed and products that would never have been able to sell before, are capable of being profitable. After reading this book I felt truly encouraged that I could grow our business in cheaper and more effective ways than ever before. Seth Godin has done great job of giving you ideas to change your business model in a way that was easy and fun to read. He gives great examples of businesses that have used models he explains and tells of their successes.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Karina Setyawan

    Great illustration of new marketing techniques and how marketing should work in Todays' world. It also contains great ideas of how the web and media could be put into good use in tools such as blogs and youtube and for us not to be afraid of putting great information online for free because this is where money might come later. Before start reading the book I was afraid that I would get turned off along the way while reading all those marketing and business theories, but turn out I wasn't at all Great illustration of new marketing techniques and how marketing should work in Todays' world. It also contains great ideas of how the web and media could be put into good use in tools such as blogs and youtube and for us not to be afraid of putting great information online for free because this is where money might come later. Before start reading the book I was afraid that I would get turned off along the way while reading all those marketing and business theories, but turn out I wasn't at all because the way the book has been organized with case studies used to illustrate each of the techniques. Any other Seth Godin works worth reading as much as this one, please feel free to recommend guys!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lain

    Godin continually wows me with his ability to convey the same messages in new and different -- and entertaining -- ways. I found many noteworthy ideas and thoughts in this book -- specifically, don't try to go after the hard-to-reach customers; stick with the ones you have and serve the heck out of them. I liked the variety of examples Godin gives -- both "do this" and "don't do this." The real-life case studies drive home his points. Anyone in business today should be considering these topics a Godin continually wows me with his ability to convey the same messages in new and different -- and entertaining -- ways. I found many noteworthy ideas and thoughts in this book -- specifically, don't try to go after the hard-to-reach customers; stick with the ones you have and serve the heck out of them. I liked the variety of examples Godin gives -- both "do this" and "don't do this." The real-life case studies drive home his points. Anyone in business today should be considering these topics and figuring out NOT how to make New Media work for them, but how to adjust their existing business to take advantage of what New Media is.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ian Mckendrick

    A real eye-opener on how moods and attentions of buyers have changed to become what they're becoming today. The book describes a great selection of varied examples of how people and organisations are changing the way they do business, and are changing their messaging in order to appeal to the hearts and minds of today more discerning customers. Seth Godin gives some brilliant insights into how these people are reinventing themselves by coming up with new ideas and exploiting the transparency of A real eye-opener on how moods and attentions of buyers have changed to become what they're becoming today. The book describes a great selection of varied examples of how people and organisations are changing the way they do business, and are changing their messaging in order to appeal to the hearts and minds of today more discerning customers. Seth Godin gives some brilliant insights into how these people are reinventing themselves by coming up with new ideas and exploiting the transparency of Social Media to get their messages across, spread virally, and drive up sales. A great book - a "must have" if you're serious about learning how you can appeal to emerging markets via the web.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Seth Godin always motivates me. This book is about leaving behind the Old style of marketing (tv, newspapers, radio, etc...) and taking up the New style of marketing (internet, viral marketing, blogs, etc...) to promote yourself and your business. I pick up his books because I want to learn how to reach more people with what I do (whether it be writing, music, etc...) and I am always encouraged by having a ton of new ideas become sparked in my brain through his books. Therefore, I will continue Seth Godin always motivates me. This book is about leaving behind the Old style of marketing (tv, newspapers, radio, etc...) and taking up the New style of marketing (internet, viral marketing, blogs, etc...) to promote yourself and your business. I pick up his books because I want to learn how to reach more people with what I do (whether it be writing, music, etc...) and I am always encouraged by having a ton of new ideas become sparked in my brain through his books. Therefore, I will continue to read everything he writes. For some reason, his writings create more new ideas in my head than any other writer.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Love

    I wasn't sure what to think about this book at first. He doesn't necessarily layout a step by step process to achieving the concepts he's presenting. He shows you the triumphs and failures of businesses in the past and present. He introduces you to businesses out there that are thriving, and you may never have even heard of them before. It was all really fascinating, and I would read the book, whatever business you may be involved in, even if you just sell stuff on ebay! I am walking a way with I wasn't sure what to think about this book at first. He doesn't necessarily layout a step by step process to achieving the concepts he's presenting. He shows you the triumphs and failures of businesses in the past and present. He introduces you to businesses out there that are thriving, and you may never have even heard of them before. It was all really fascinating, and I would read the book, whatever business you may be involved in, even if you just sell stuff on ebay! I am walking a way with an entire new outlook on sales, marketing, and our economy. This book is a real eye-opener and not one that you want to miss out on! Pick it up! You won't regret it!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Janelle Kathryn

    "Meatball sundae" is what you get when you try to mix old and new marketing. Interesting read and a new subject to me. The good news is, meatballs (old) and sundaes (new) dont match at all so it doesnt matter if you know nothing of ye old ways. Out with the old, in with the new. Sadly this book itself is old (2007), limited by being on a ye old medium, a book, itself. Oh the irony. Though Godin has a blog too. Anywho, updated & more in-depth, examples wouldve been great. I read the first 90% of t "Meatball sundae" is what you get when you try to mix old and new marketing. Interesting read and a new subject to me. The good news is, meatballs (old) and sundaes (new) dont match at all so it doesnt matter if you know nothing of ye old ways. Out with the old, in with the new. Sadly this book itself is old (2007), limited by being on a ye old medium, a book, itself. Oh the irony. Though Godin has a blog too. Anywho, updated & more in-depth, examples wouldve been great. I read the first 90% of this book way back and only finished the rest now, but it cant be good that I dont remember any of the examples.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Frank

    Seth Godin's genius lies in his keen perception of how the elements of business must work in harmony (that old 'synergy'), and in his unfailing ability to spot where current companies do not. This one of his books is about the New Marketing - social media, video, web 2.0 - and how most companies (hint: all the ones that slap a Facebook logo on their mugs and ask you to "follow us on Twitter!") are doing it plain WRONG. His central thesis? Social Marketing is not something you USE - it's somethin Seth Godin's genius lies in his keen perception of how the elements of business must work in harmony (that old 'synergy'), and in his unfailing ability to spot where current companies do not. This one of his books is about the New Marketing - social media, video, web 2.0 - and how most companies (hint: all the ones that slap a Facebook logo on their mugs and ask you to "follow us on Twitter!") are doing it plain WRONG. His central thesis? Social Marketing is not something you USE - it's something you ARE. Read and learn.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    I found this book gave a great insight in how to manage marketing in this new world. We are who we are, we are who we work for, and who we work for are us. There is no hidden corp anymore, there are no secrets and word of mouth is the power of marketing in this era. There needs to be a story and every person in the company needs to be part of that story, they need to have the same story and believe that story.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Devin Partlow

    14 of the new marketing trends! Build you business around these and increase your chances of success. Its great to see that even though the author came up in the old market as a marketer, he's recognized the new marketing trends as the playing field becomes increasingly more level and that he even build Squidoo to test his assumptions. Another book that I recommend to anyone that is trying to sell stuff to anyone else.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Moseydotes

    A no-time-at-all read, and like most of Seth's books, brought a lot of concepts that I already had something of a grasp on into perspective so that I can more easily implement them... but then I guess that's the hallmark of a Seth Godin reading experience for me: that it delivers fresh info in a way that makes me feel like "Yeah, I knew that already... why am I doing this / not doing that?!?"

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Fantastic summary of the new world of digital marketing. It contains many useful and thought-provoking sections on market approaches in the modern age including the typical topics of social networks, blogs, etc. The author is also very helpful in displaying the impact of the old ways of doing business when companies don't pay attention to market trends and opportunities. Very well written.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael Schutz

    Coming from a church leader, the best analogy I can draw for church leaders to get Meatball Sundae is "new wineskins". This is another great book by Seth. Sure, it's targeted at marketers. but since he defines marketing as story-telling, church leaders have a LOT to learn from him, and from this book. We are challenged to wrestle with the concept of new wineskins for ministry today.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Frank Zijlstra

    Seth tells in this book very clearly what's happening in marketingland. The meatball stands for the old way of advertising by older brands. The Sundae stands for the way how new media is intergrated in those brands. I recommend this book to every marketeer; a must have!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Teri Temme

    It's simple really, according to Seth, in order to thrive you need to do only 2 things: make something worth talking about and make it easy to talk about. If only. . . Great read, fast, informational and humorous. And the bottom line is: "What we've wanted all along is to be treated with respect and to be connected to other people."

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