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Teaching Johnny to Think: A Philosophy of Education Based on the Principles of Ayn Rand's Objectivism

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30 review for Teaching Johnny to Think: A Philosophy of Education Based on the Principles of Ayn Rand's Objectivism

  1. 5 out of 5

    Roslyn

    Enjoyed his explanation of learning and where our current education system goes wrong--fascinating how many choices (like educational theory) come from philosophy that we don't realize. (Down with Kant!!!!) But his advocation of behaviorist techniques to fix the problem is... confusing to say the least. Flat out wrong as well. But also confusing since he is an Objectivist and should be absolutely and entirely against behaviorism. I guess without a significant amount of study, no one can come up Enjoyed his explanation of learning and where our current education system goes wrong--fascinating how many choices (like educational theory) come from philosophy that we don't realize. (Down with Kant!!!!) But his advocation of behaviorist techniques to fix the problem is... confusing to say the least. Flat out wrong as well. But also confusing since he is an Objectivist and should be absolutely and entirely against behaviorism. I guess without a significant amount of study, no one can come up with an alternative. Thank goodness for me!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ietrio

    I know Leonard Peikoff is an old man. And I was expecting Leonard Peikoff to be quite impressive because of his work in relation to Ayn Rand. Yet Leonard Peikoff is spectacularly dim. He comes from a few generations behind and has a hard time understanding things like 1970s. But, as any old privileged man, he knows his ways were the best, and that is all that counts to him. To make things worse, he is simply a continental philosopher presenting his brain gases as facts instead of the speculation I know Leonard Peikoff is an old man. And I was expecting Leonard Peikoff to be quite impressive because of his work in relation to Ayn Rand. Yet Leonard Peikoff is spectacularly dim. He comes from a few generations behind and has a hard time understanding things like 1970s. But, as any old privileged man, he knows his ways were the best, and that is all that counts to him. To make things worse, he is simply a continental philosopher presenting his brain gases as facts instead of the speculations of a limited intellect, which they are. To make the book even worse, the poor senile believes that the plural of anecdote is data. So Leonard Peikoff starts in 1984. Given the progress in understanding education back in 1960s and 1970s his 1984 discourse is simply preaching to the fans. The man knows "the only" way things can be done. And as proof he presents his past time through schools that are rated good by who knows what method and than everything builds up to his majestic way of demolishing the straw man. He even goes as far in his blissful ignorance to present how good a teacher might be. The teacher is good not because of some numbers, say percentage of students reaching higher education, but because the teacher is interesting to a half senile viewer passing by. And that excellent teacher achieves nothing. That should have been sign enough that the teacher is simply another bureaucrat doing a job. So what the teacher will do? "blow a shrieking police whistle to shock them into silence". A good method of hazing, but that is what Leonard Peikoff could get as education. Shock for the barbaric method? A confirmation the teacher can't muster enough brain power to be interesting? No! The minors deserve it for not paying attention. So could Leonard Peikoff teach Johnny to think? I doubt himself can do a lot of thinking.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dwayne Roberts

    This is an excellent explanation of the failure of the American (and presumably other) elementary and secondary education. Teachers and parents of school-age children will find this book enlightening.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    Still not sure what Objectivism is, but as for the purpose, method, & curriculum of education, I can get behind this!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Richard Zierer

    Fantastic - this book was adapted from lectures by Peikoff in the 1980s. He gives a very comprehensive picture of the American education system, particularly K-12. Peikoff's description of the disintegrated thinking method taught in modern schools, and the pervasive influence of Dewey's theory of Progressive education, is comprehensive and insightful. It provides a very informative account of why American schools have fallen behind the rest of the world, and one of the primary reasons for the dec Fantastic - this book was adapted from lectures by Peikoff in the 1980s. He gives a very comprehensive picture of the American education system, particularly K-12. Peikoff's description of the disintegrated thinking method taught in modern schools, and the pervasive influence of Dewey's theory of Progressive education, is comprehensive and insightful. It provides a very informative account of why American schools have fallen behind the rest of the world, and one of the primary reasons for the decline in independent thought among college students and adult graduates today. I also recommend reading Ayn Rand's article "The Comprachicos" for anyone else interested in learning more about the American education system.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Adam Barger

    This is a good effort in linking objectivism and the teachings of Rand to educational philosophy and practice, but it falls short. Peikoff is not an educationalist, and his summary and assumptions of education show this lack of knowledge and experience. However, he does effectively offer thoughtful critiques of the current statist educational system as well as practical arguments on curricular changes. Most interesting is his concept-bases approach to teaching and learning discussed throughout.

  7. 5 out of 5

    J.R.

    Good content. Organized poorly (admitted from lectures).

  8. 4 out of 5

    Pavel Urubčík

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  10. 5 out of 5

    Evan Woodham

  11. 4 out of 5

    MARK DA CUNHA

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tal Tsfany

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gustav

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Enyart

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jasmin Kocaer

  17. 4 out of 5

    James

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amy Mossoff

  19. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Bone

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jon Tee

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Reeves

  22. 4 out of 5

    William R. Laird, Jr.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Fredrik Ørbeck-Nilssen

  24. 5 out of 5

    Josiah R

  25. 5 out of 5

    Thapa Kapil Bikram

  26. 4 out of 5

    Fabian Bollinger

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nixon Sucuc

  29. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  30. 4 out of 5

    Evans

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