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May It Please the Court: The Most Significant Oral Arguments Made Before the Supreme Court Since 1955

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Until The New Press first published May It Please the Court in 1993, few Americans knew that every case argued before the Supreme Court since 1955 had been recorded. The original book-and-tape set was a revelation to readers and reviewers, quickly becoming a bestseller and garnering praise across the nation. May It Please the Court includes both live recordings and transcri Until The New Press first published May It Please the Court in 1993, few Americans knew that every case argued before the Supreme Court since 1955 had been recorded. The original book-and-tape set was a revelation to readers and reviewers, quickly becoming a bestseller and garnering praise across the nation. May It Please the Court includes both live recordings and transcripts of oral arguments in twenty-three of the most significant cases argued before the Supreme Court in the second half of the twentiethcentury. This edition makes the recordings available on an MP3 audio CD. Through the voices of some of the nation’s most important lawyers and justices, including Thurgood Marshall, Archibald Cox, and Earl Warren, it offers a chance to hear firsthand our justice system at work, in the highest court of the land. Cases included: Gideon v. Wainwright (right to counsel) Abington School District v. Schempp (school prayer) Miranda v. Arizona (“the right to remain silent”) Roe v. Wade (abortion rights) Edwards v. Aguillard (teaching “creationism”) Regents v. Bakke (reverse discrimination) Wisconsin v. Yoder (compulsory schooling for the Amish) Tinker v. Des Moines (Vietnam protest in schools) Texas v. Johnson (flag burning) New York Times v. United States (Pentagon Papers) Cox v. Louisiana (civil rights demonstrations) Communist Party v. Subversive Activities Control Board (freedom of association) Terry v. Ohio (“stop and frisk” by police) Gregg v. Georgia (capital punishment) Cooper v. Aaron (Little Rock school desegregation) Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States (public accommodations) Palmer v. Thompson (swimming pool integration) Loving v. Virginia (interracial marriage) San Antonio v. Rodriguez (equal funding for public schools) Bowers v. Hardwick (homosexual rights) Baker v. Carr (“one person, one vote”) United States v. Nixon (Watergate tapes) DeShaney v. Winnebago County (child abuse)


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Until The New Press first published May It Please the Court in 1993, few Americans knew that every case argued before the Supreme Court since 1955 had been recorded. The original book-and-tape set was a revelation to readers and reviewers, quickly becoming a bestseller and garnering praise across the nation. May It Please the Court includes both live recordings and transcri Until The New Press first published May It Please the Court in 1993, few Americans knew that every case argued before the Supreme Court since 1955 had been recorded. The original book-and-tape set was a revelation to readers and reviewers, quickly becoming a bestseller and garnering praise across the nation. May It Please the Court includes both live recordings and transcripts of oral arguments in twenty-three of the most significant cases argued before the Supreme Court in the second half of the twentiethcentury. This edition makes the recordings available on an MP3 audio CD. Through the voices of some of the nation’s most important lawyers and justices, including Thurgood Marshall, Archibald Cox, and Earl Warren, it offers a chance to hear firsthand our justice system at work, in the highest court of the land. Cases included: Gideon v. Wainwright (right to counsel) Abington School District v. Schempp (school prayer) Miranda v. Arizona (“the right to remain silent”) Roe v. Wade (abortion rights) Edwards v. Aguillard (teaching “creationism”) Regents v. Bakke (reverse discrimination) Wisconsin v. Yoder (compulsory schooling for the Amish) Tinker v. Des Moines (Vietnam protest in schools) Texas v. Johnson (flag burning) New York Times v. United States (Pentagon Papers) Cox v. Louisiana (civil rights demonstrations) Communist Party v. Subversive Activities Control Board (freedom of association) Terry v. Ohio (“stop and frisk” by police) Gregg v. Georgia (capital punishment) Cooper v. Aaron (Little Rock school desegregation) Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States (public accommodations) Palmer v. Thompson (swimming pool integration) Loving v. Virginia (interracial marriage) San Antonio v. Rodriguez (equal funding for public schools) Bowers v. Hardwick (homosexual rights) Baker v. Carr (“one person, one vote”) United States v. Nixon (Watergate tapes) DeShaney v. Winnebago County (child abuse)

30 review for May It Please the Court: The Most Significant Oral Arguments Made Before the Supreme Court Since 1955

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ethan

    This is a great reference work, compiling into one place some of the most landmark cases the US Supreme Court has ever faced. I struggled a bit with the editing of the transcripts, and the "Narrator" jumps in occasionally, sometimes with useful information, sometimes not. This is a great reference work, compiling into one place some of the most landmark cases the US Supreme Court has ever faced. I struggled a bit with the editing of the transcripts, and the "Narrator" jumps in occasionally, sometimes with useful information, sometimes not.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Steven Yenzer

    Reading transcriptions of oral arguments is dry, but the editing and narration make this as interesting as it can be. I think I'd prefer to listen to the documentary series that this was based on, but it was still a good read. Reading transcriptions of oral arguments is dry, but the editing and narration make this as interesting as it can be. I think I'd prefer to listen to the documentary series that this was based on, but it was still a good read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    Great for what it is. Best when used in conjunction with a better summary of the Majority and Dissenting opinions.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ramil Agayev

  5. 4 out of 5

    Phil Mooney

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Terry

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    Kevin

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    Jon Cvack

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    Chris

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    Maria Dippolito

  11. 5 out of 5

    Peter

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  13. 5 out of 5

    Mario André

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Applin

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sean

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michael Hecker

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    Kim

  19. 5 out of 5

    Salina

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    Kim Gudeth

  21. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

  22. 5 out of 5

    JJessica KennedyDAWS

  23. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Itacy

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

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    Hope Hughes

  26. 5 out of 5

    D

  27. 4 out of 5

    WelcomeLouise

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ari J

  29. 4 out of 5

    Karen Cushing

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

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