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The Good Life: New Mexico Traditions and Food

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Focusing on traditional New Mexico life and cooking, this work features over eighty recipes representing the culinary essence of Northern New Mexico kitchens. Evoking the customs of Hispano family life, it aims to preserve her native traditions while imparting to modern cooks kitchen-tested dishes adapted for the modern kitchen.


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Focusing on traditional New Mexico life and cooking, this work features over eighty recipes representing the culinary essence of Northern New Mexico kitchens. Evoking the customs of Hispano family life, it aims to preserve her native traditions while imparting to modern cooks kitchen-tested dishes adapted for the modern kitchen.

27 review for The Good Life: New Mexico Traditions and Food

  1. 4 out of 5

    Julie Davis

    I read about this book in Huntley Dent's excellent Feast of Santa Fe. It's been on my "to read" list for a really long time and then I realized that the library had it, just when I was casting around for something food-ish to read. This is a charming book with the first half made up of stories about a typical New Mexican family and their food preparation. Though not written for children, there was something in it that reminded me of the Little House books by Laura Ingalls Wilder with their fascin I read about this book in Huntley Dent's excellent Feast of Santa Fe. It's been on my "to read" list for a really long time and then I realized that the library had it, just when I was casting around for something food-ish to read. This is a charming book with the first half made up of stories about a typical New Mexican family and their food preparation. Though not written for children, there was something in it that reminded me of the Little House books by Laura Ingalls Wilder with their fascinating details of pioneer life. It covers harvesting chiles, special events like weddings or wakes, and various other food-centric events. The last half has the recipes, in typical old fashioned brevity. There are no lengthy instructions, but simple directions. There is something freeing in this if one thinks about it. The cook is not left to match up to another cook's standards, but to give it a try themselves. And if they like the results, they are free to try to improve it or match it next time. It is a brief book but I enjoyed it a lot.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dree

    An interesting little book. Essentially a cookbook, there is actually a short story at the beginning to illustrate when these recipes were traditionally used, how items were made, and the amount of work that could go into one day's cooking and the planning needed when harvesting wild plants. This story could easily be read by children. The recipes are fascinating. There are some I will never try, but I do want to get some rennet and try the basic cheese recipe. Several of the recipes using cheese An interesting little book. Essentially a cookbook, there is actually a short story at the beginning to illustrate when these recipes were traditionally used, how items were made, and the amount of work that could go into one day's cooking and the planning needed when harvesting wild plants. This story could easily be read by children. The recipes are fascinating. There are some I will never try, but I do want to get some rennet and try the basic cheese recipe. Several of the recipes using cheese sound delicious, as do some of the sandwiches, the sponge cake, etc. I may never follow these exactly, but I have some new ideas. I absolutely love broiled/peeled/chopped Anaheim chiles. Next time I get some I think I will be having a cheese and green chile sandwich (p. 70). Yum.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Hilary

    This book was clumsily written, and hearkened back to an earlier, simpler time that the reader is supposed to yearn for... but doesn't. For god's sake, these women cook all the time, wake up early, stay up late, work, work, work, work, work... and beat eggs with their hands! While the book skipped along and had some really cool recipes in it, I didn't really like it that much because of its writing style. This book was clumsily written, and hearkened back to an earlier, simpler time that the reader is supposed to yearn for... but doesn't. For god's sake, these women cook all the time, wake up early, stay up late, work, work, work, work, work... and beat eggs with their hands! While the book skipped along and had some really cool recipes in it, I didn't really like it that much because of its writing style.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

    A nice little book written in 1931 in which the author tells stories of the old ways in northern New Mexico. The recipe section which follows gives the basic and traditional recipes for foods still eaten today. A lovely historical glimpse into foods I enjoy.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

  6. 4 out of 5

    Deena Santori

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  8. 5 out of 5

    Manintheboat

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tom Thom

  10. 4 out of 5

    Veronica

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

  12. 4 out of 5

    David S

  13. 5 out of 5

    Queenie Cabrera

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brad

  16. 4 out of 5

    Erin Boers

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

  18. 4 out of 5

    Robert Ruybalid

  19. 5 out of 5

    Betty

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Crowell

  21. 4 out of 5

    ShellWolf

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

  23. 5 out of 5

    JRC

  24. 5 out of 5

    David

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sue Ann

  27. 5 out of 5

    Charlie

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