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How are we to make sense of madness and psychosis? For most of us the words conjure up images from television and newspapers of seemingly random, meaningless violence. It is something to be feared, something to be left to the experts, psychiatrists and psychologists. But is madness best thought of as a medical condition? Psychiatrists and the drug industry maintain that ps How are we to make sense of madness and psychosis? For most of us the words conjure up images from television and newspapers of seemingly random, meaningless violence. It is something to be feared, something to be left to the experts, psychiatrists and psychologists. But is madness best thought of as a medical condition? Psychiatrists and the drug industry maintain that psychoses are brain disorders amenable to treatment with drugs, but is this actually so? There is no convincing evidence that the brain is disordered in psychosis, yet governments across the world are investing huge sums of money on mental health services that take for granted the idea that psychosis is an illness to be treated with medication. Although some people who use mental health services find medication helpful, many do not, and resist the idea that their experiences are symptoms of illnesses like schizophrenia. Consequently they are forced into having treatment against their wishes. So, how do we make sense out of this situation? Postpsychiatry addresses these questions. It involves an attempt to rethink some of the fundamental assumptions of mental health work, showing how recent developments in philosophy and ethics can help us to clarify some of the dilemmas and conflicts around different understandings of madness. Throughout, the authors examine the conflicting ways in which politicians, academics and mental health professionals appear to understand madness, and contrast this with voices and experiences that are usually excluded - those of the people who use mental health services. They then examine the power of psychiatry to shape how we understand ourselves and our emotions, before considering some of the basic limitations of psychiatry as science to make madness meaningful. In the final section of the book they draw on evidence from service users and survivors, the humanities and anthropology, to point out a new direction for mental health practice. Th


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How are we to make sense of madness and psychosis? For most of us the words conjure up images from television and newspapers of seemingly random, meaningless violence. It is something to be feared, something to be left to the experts, psychiatrists and psychologists. But is madness best thought of as a medical condition? Psychiatrists and the drug industry maintain that ps How are we to make sense of madness and psychosis? For most of us the words conjure up images from television and newspapers of seemingly random, meaningless violence. It is something to be feared, something to be left to the experts, psychiatrists and psychologists. But is madness best thought of as a medical condition? Psychiatrists and the drug industry maintain that psychoses are brain disorders amenable to treatment with drugs, but is this actually so? There is no convincing evidence that the brain is disordered in psychosis, yet governments across the world are investing huge sums of money on mental health services that take for granted the idea that psychosis is an illness to be treated with medication. Although some people who use mental health services find medication helpful, many do not, and resist the idea that their experiences are symptoms of illnesses like schizophrenia. Consequently they are forced into having treatment against their wishes. So, how do we make sense out of this situation? Postpsychiatry addresses these questions. It involves an attempt to rethink some of the fundamental assumptions of mental health work, showing how recent developments in philosophy and ethics can help us to clarify some of the dilemmas and conflicts around different understandings of madness. Throughout, the authors examine the conflicting ways in which politicians, academics and mental health professionals appear to understand madness, and contrast this with voices and experiences that are usually excluded - those of the people who use mental health services. They then examine the power of psychiatry to shape how we understand ourselves and our emotions, before considering some of the basic limitations of psychiatry as science to make madness meaningful. In the final section of the book they draw on evidence from service users and survivors, the humanities and anthropology, to point out a new direction for mental health practice. Th

33 review for Postpsychiatry: Mental Health in a Postmodern World

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tomás Narvaja

    Honestly, do yourself a favor a read Gut Feminism by Elizabeth Wilson instead. This book mainly points out the binary of biology/psycho-social with biology being prioritized currently in psychiatry and argues for simply flipping it. Wilson actually addresses the problem of the binary itself and the problem with taking either the approach currently being taken which prioritizes biology, or the approach Bracken and Thomas take in the book. She's significantly more nuanced and critical, and her wor Honestly, do yourself a favor a read Gut Feminism by Elizabeth Wilson instead. This book mainly points out the binary of biology/psycho-social with biology being prioritized currently in psychiatry and argues for simply flipping it. Wilson actually addresses the problem of the binary itself and the problem with taking either the approach currently being taken which prioritizes biology, or the approach Bracken and Thomas take in the book. She's significantly more nuanced and critical, and her work is more up to date.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Geneviève

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    Pamela McNamara

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    Charley Eliza

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    Julia Rasmussen

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    Mark

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    Brittney Jasmin

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    Jolan Standaert

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    Linea Johnson

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    Amber Spinella

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    Nick Hartley

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    David Stubbe teglbjærg

  32. 4 out of 5

    Dan DalMonte

  33. 4 out of 5

    Mr Mark

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