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An extraordinary story, never before told: The intimate, behind-the-scenes life of an American boy raised by his terrorist father—the man who planned the 1993 World Trade Center bombing. What is it like to grow up with a terrorist in your home? Zak Ebrahim was only seven years old when, on November 5th, 1990, his father El-Sayyid Nosair shot and killed the leader of the Jew An extraordinary story, never before told: The intimate, behind-the-scenes life of an American boy raised by his terrorist father—the man who planned the 1993 World Trade Center bombing. What is it like to grow up with a terrorist in your home? Zak Ebrahim was only seven years old when, on November 5th, 1990, his father El-Sayyid Nosair shot and killed the leader of the Jewish Defense League. While in prison, Nosair helped plan the bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993. In one of his infamous video messages, Osama bin Laden urged the world to “Remember El-Sayyid Nosair.” For Zak Ebrahim, a childhood amongst terrorism was all he knew. After his father’s incarceration, his family moved often, and as the perpetual new kid in class, he faced constant teasing and exclusion. Yet, though his radicalized father and uncles modeled fanatical beliefs, to Ebrahim something never felt right. To the shy, awkward boy, something about the hateful feelings just felt unnatural. In this book, Ebrahim dispels the myth that terrorism is a foregone conclusion for people trained to hate. Based on his own remarkable journey, he shows that hate is always a choice—but so is tolerance. Though Ebrahim was subjected to a violent, intolerant ideology throughout his childhood, he did not become radicalized. Ebrahim argues that people conditioned to be terrorists are actually well positioned to combat terrorism, because of their ability to bring seemingly incompatible ideologies together in conversation and advocate in the fight for peace. Ebrahim argues that everyone, regardless of their upbringing or circumstances, can learn to tap into their inherent empathy and embrace tolerance over hatred. His original, urgent message is fresh, groundbreaking, and essential to the current discussion about terrorism.


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An extraordinary story, never before told: The intimate, behind-the-scenes life of an American boy raised by his terrorist father—the man who planned the 1993 World Trade Center bombing. What is it like to grow up with a terrorist in your home? Zak Ebrahim was only seven years old when, on November 5th, 1990, his father El-Sayyid Nosair shot and killed the leader of the Jew An extraordinary story, never before told: The intimate, behind-the-scenes life of an American boy raised by his terrorist father—the man who planned the 1993 World Trade Center bombing. What is it like to grow up with a terrorist in your home? Zak Ebrahim was only seven years old when, on November 5th, 1990, his father El-Sayyid Nosair shot and killed the leader of the Jewish Defense League. While in prison, Nosair helped plan the bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993. In one of his infamous video messages, Osama bin Laden urged the world to “Remember El-Sayyid Nosair.” For Zak Ebrahim, a childhood amongst terrorism was all he knew. After his father’s incarceration, his family moved often, and as the perpetual new kid in class, he faced constant teasing and exclusion. Yet, though his radicalized father and uncles modeled fanatical beliefs, to Ebrahim something never felt right. To the shy, awkward boy, something about the hateful feelings just felt unnatural. In this book, Ebrahim dispels the myth that terrorism is a foregone conclusion for people trained to hate. Based on his own remarkable journey, he shows that hate is always a choice—but so is tolerance. Though Ebrahim was subjected to a violent, intolerant ideology throughout his childhood, he did not become radicalized. Ebrahim argues that people conditioned to be terrorists are actually well positioned to combat terrorism, because of their ability to bring seemingly incompatible ideologies together in conversation and advocate in the fight for peace. Ebrahim argues that everyone, regardless of their upbringing or circumstances, can learn to tap into their inherent empathy and embrace tolerance over hatred. His original, urgent message is fresh, groundbreaking, and essential to the current discussion about terrorism.

30 review for The Terrorist's Son: A Story of Choice

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lynda

    One of my favourite quotes is from Mahatma Gandhi: Zak Ebrahim is a living testament of this quote. He is the son of a terrorist, El Sayyid Nosair, a father who, in 1990, assassinated Meir Kahane, the militant ultra-Orthodox, anti-Arab rabbi and founder of the Jewish Defense League. Zak was just 7 years old. Then, from prison, his father helped plot the 1993 World Trade Center bombing - and was later convicted as one of the conspirators. He was sentenced to life imprisonment without parole. TERROR One of my favourite quotes is from Mahatma Gandhi: Zak Ebrahim is a living testament of this quote. He is the son of a terrorist, El Sayyid Nosair, a father who, in 1990, assassinated Meir Kahane, the militant ultra-Orthodox, anti-Arab rabbi and founder of the Jewish Defense League. Zak was just 7 years old. Then, from prison, his father helped plot the 1993 World Trade Center bombing - and was later convicted as one of the conspirators. He was sentenced to life imprisonment without parole. TERRORISM - there is no more important subject in the world at this moment. I do not know a single person who is not appalled and frightened in equal measure by the spread of Islamic fanaticism, especially the seemingly unstoppable rise of the gang of murderers known as Islamic State, Al Qaeda, Taliban. In addition it makes most of us rage as well as weep that young people are often the innocent victims; the recent slaying of school children in Peshawar still at the forefront of my mind. We may loathe and fear this mind-set, yet we must still seek to be informed about it. And that's exactly what this book does. It informs. It's a real-life example of someone who was raised by a fanatic yet came to embrace nonviolence. Zak Ebrahim as a child, with his father El Sayyid Nosair The last time Ebrahim spoke to his father was in 1998. Now, Ebrahim travels the country speaking out against hatred and everything his father stands for. His nine-minute TED talk was released along with the book, which was published in partnership with Simon & Schuster in September 2014. You can listen to his talk here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lyR-K2... His message is that fanaticism is a choice. “Even if you’re trained to hate, you can choose tolerance. You can choose empathy,” he writes. Ebrahim understands the sad failing of his father. “He chose terrorism over fatherhood, and hate over love,” he explains. “My father chose terrorism over me.” Nosair, now 58, remains in federal prison. Ebrahim's mother divorced him long ago and remarried. He hasn't seen his children since 1995. "He is my son, by birth," Nosair told a Los Angeles Times reporter via email last year. "But he has disowned me and my way of life." Ebrahim acknowledges that he may never understand why his father chose killing over his family. "I still feel something for him, something that I haven’t been able to eradicate - some strand of pity and guilt, I guess, though it’s thin as spider’s silk," Ebrahim writes. "I realize now that I don’t really know my father. I never really knew him." Ebrahim today As I type this review in my Dubai study, with the doors and windows open, I hear the call to prayer. It is beautiful. It is melodic. It is one of the most distinctive elements associated with living in the Middle East. And as I listen and ponder this book, I think again about the above quote of Muhatma Gandhi. Fighting evil with evil won’t help anyone. An eye for eye only ends up making the whole world blind. Ebrahim's original, urgent message is fresh, groundbreaking, and essential to the current discussion about terrorism. Be informed. Read this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mikey B.

    Page 12 (my book) There’s a reason that murderous hatred has to be taught – and not just taught but forcibly implanted... It is a lie told over and over again – often to people who have no resources and who are denied alternative views of the world. It’s a lie my father believed, and one he hoped to pass on to me. A highly interesting and personal story of a young man whose father became an Islamic terrorist. In 1990 his father shot and killed a rabbi, Meir Kahane. The author was seven years old a Page 12 (my book) There’s a reason that murderous hatred has to be taught – and not just taught but forcibly implanted... It is a lie told over and over again – often to people who have no resources and who are denied alternative views of the world. It’s a lie my father believed, and one he hoped to pass on to me. A highly interesting and personal story of a young man whose father became an Islamic terrorist. In 1990 his father shot and killed a rabbi, Meir Kahane. The author was seven years old at the time. His father was from Egypt and married an American woman – the author was born in the U.S. in 1983. From prison his father conspired with other Islamic terrorists in the first bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993. When queried by his son the father constantly lied or obfuscated about his involvement in these terrorist crimes. The son never became like his father. With his mother and siblings they struggled to survive and moved numerous times after his father’s incarceration. His mother remarried - and this man was abusive to his wife and children. The author had many reasons to embrace radical Islam – but always kept his mind open. He became more and more aware of the diversity he found in his country. He expressed and found empathy, instead of hatred, for others. Page 79 When I was a kid, I never questioned what I heard at home or at school or the mosque. Bigotry just kind of slipped into my system along with everything else: Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone. Pi equals 3.14. All Jews are evil and homosexuality is an abomination. Paris is the capital of France. They all sounded like facts. ..I was made to fear people who were different and kept away from them as much as possible for my own “protection”... I never got close enough to find out if I should fear them in the first place. This is a touching story of how this young boy grew up and extracted himself from the seeds of hatred. This is a short book and highly recommended. There is a TED talk by the author http://www.ted.com/talks/zak_ebrahim_...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Millett

    It's a short book, so a quick read, but such an important one! For anyone who has ever wondered WHY would an American Muslim turn to such dastardly deeds, like murder or plotting the World Trade Center bombings...and what about the families? Zak Ebrahim tells a heart-rending tale of how his father, an Egyptian engineer, turns radical and the impact on his mother (an American-born Catholic who converted) and his siblings, as well as himself. Zak advocates for peace and love now. Of radical terror It's a short book, so a quick read, but such an important one! For anyone who has ever wondered WHY would an American Muslim turn to such dastardly deeds, like murder or plotting the World Trade Center bombings...and what about the families? Zak Ebrahim tells a heart-rending tale of how his father, an Egyptian engineer, turns radical and the impact on his mother (an American-born Catholic who converted) and his siblings, as well as himself. Zak advocates for peace and love now. Of radical terrorists, he says, "...turning someone into a bigot is the first step in turning him into a terrorist. You find someone vulnerable--someone who's lost his confidence, his income, his pride, his agency. Someone who feels humiliated by life. And then you isolate him. You fill him with fear and fury, and you see to it that he regards anybody who's different as a faceless target..."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Zaira

    I think this is an extremely important story. It goes to show us that all of us, have a choice with regard to the life we want to live. It's crucial that we understand that no matter our upbringing, once we're able to think for ourselves, we get to *choose* to be who we want. As the quote goes, no one can imprison your mind without you letting them. This is a powerful message and one that I'll hold on to forever. I think this is an extremely important story. It goes to show us that all of us, have a choice with regard to the life we want to live. It's crucial that we understand that no matter our upbringing, once we're able to think for ourselves, we get to *choose* to be who we want. As the quote goes, no one can imprison your mind without you letting them. This is a powerful message and one that I'll hold on to forever.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Yigal Zur

    amazing story of zak ebrahim who his father shot rabbi Meir Kahane. a great read of a struggle of a sensitive soul to battle evil

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rudaina

    As much as i enjoyed this book I was filled with sadness reading it. So heartbreaking how this family struggled to live because of the father's descisions that led to a disaster. As much as i enjoyed this book I was filled with sadness reading it. So heartbreaking how this family struggled to live because of the father's descisions that led to a disaster.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Praxedes

    What a compelling title! Too bad the contents did not match it.... Ebrahim implies that he was able to overcome his father's upbringing by embracing a theme of kindness and empathy. No problem there. But he wasn't actually raised by his father (who was in prison since Ebrahim was seven) and the transformation from a hate-based childhood to compassionate adulthood was too glib and superficial. This was a very unsatisfying read. True, he overcame hardship due to his father's involvement in terrorism What a compelling title! Too bad the contents did not match it.... Ebrahim implies that he was able to overcome his father's upbringing by embracing a theme of kindness and empathy. No problem there. But he wasn't actually raised by his father (who was in prison since Ebrahim was seven) and the transformation from a hate-based childhood to compassionate adulthood was too glib and superficial. This was a very unsatisfying read. True, he overcame hardship due to his father's involvement in terrorism. His positive message about adopting a lifestyle extolling peace is also worthy. But the plot focused on myriad details of his challenges growing up (bullying, an abusive stepfather, issues with self-esteem, etc.) that occur daily to kids whose fathers are *not* terrorists. This lack of singularity is what bothered me the most about this book. I hope the TED talk by this author is more elucidating.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    I heard the author speak on NPR while driving in Sumatra and felt inspired enough by his words to write down his name to look up. Just recently I found the scrap of paper and then found the book online...once opening the first page, I was mesmerized. His story is so full of pain...and I couldn't put down his memoir. He was born the son of a man that assassinated a rabbi...and then later, from jail, helped plot the first attack on the Twin Towers in NY. He was brought up in a conservative Muslim I heard the author speak on NPR while driving in Sumatra and felt inspired enough by his words to write down his name to look up. Just recently I found the scrap of paper and then found the book online...once opening the first page, I was mesmerized. His story is so full of pain...and I couldn't put down his memoir. He was born the son of a man that assassinated a rabbi...and then later, from jail, helped plot the first attack on the Twin Towers in NY. He was brought up in a conservative Muslim family, but learned as he grew (both farther from his father and older) that he was not willing to be a part of the hatred or bigotry that his father's version played in the world. Growing up bullied and then later abused by his stepfather, Z was able to overcome his troubles...and find empathy and compassion for others. I wish others could come out of a struggle with the same results. My only problem with the book is that I wish it was longer. I would have liked to have read more about his life in Egypt, the separation of his mother and stepfather, and what he did after high school. Read if you enjoy memoirs and like to read about overcoming challenges.

  9. 5 out of 5

    C.S. Boag

    I picked up this odd looking little book at an airport bookshop amongst all the airport rubbish, and it's a gem. It's what it says it is - the memoir of the son of a terrorist - and it makes for chilling but instructive reading. The messages come out loud and clear: 1. Terrorists area fringe group - this particular one happens to be attached to a religion, but they can be anyone; 2.Young people can be influenced by purveyors of hate - although they needn't be; 3. It's a bastard being a son of a terr I picked up this odd looking little book at an airport bookshop amongst all the airport rubbish, and it's a gem. It's what it says it is - the memoir of the son of a terrorist - and it makes for chilling but instructive reading. The messages come out loud and clear: 1. Terrorists area fringe group - this particular one happens to be attached to a religion, but they can be anyone; 2.Young people can be influenced by purveyors of hate - although they needn't be; 3. It's a bastard being a son of a terrorist - but there's a choice. This is the story of that choice - the writer becomes a pacifist warning others against taking the road his father went down. That poor boy ended up a good man.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Melody

    This was such a powerful little book. Reluctant to read it, I waited till the last minute thinking I wouldn't learn much. But once again, I was wrong. The details of a family living with the aftermath of a father's terrorism was chilling and sad. It was important to think about families whose leaders make poor decisions that affect their children's basic needs for life. So glad that Zak Ebrahim could see and move beyond the limitations he grew up with. It's a triumph! This was such a powerful little book. Reluctant to read it, I waited till the last minute thinking I wouldn't learn much. But once again, I was wrong. The details of a family living with the aftermath of a father's terrorism was chilling and sad. It was important to think about families whose leaders make poor decisions that affect their children's basic needs for life. So glad that Zak Ebrahim could see and move beyond the limitations he grew up with. It's a triumph!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lien To

    3.5 stars **** Extraordinary story of a boy living behind the shadows of a terrorist father. Alot of poignant and inspirational lines in the book, my favourite will have be "My father lost his way- but that didn't stop me from finding mine." A story of faith instigating that we are the writers of our own stories. 3.5 stars **** Extraordinary story of a boy living behind the shadows of a terrorist father. Alot of poignant and inspirational lines in the book, my favourite will have be "My father lost his way- but that didn't stop me from finding mine." A story of faith instigating that we are the writers of our own stories.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Tough story about how one generation’s loss of faith in the American Dream can lead them down a dark road of fear, hate, bigotry, and violence....but the next can choose a different path. This book is about the son of a terrorist, his father’s name is one many will recognize, but maybe we should know the son’s name more than his father, and have the names of those that can turn away from hatred and violence as easily called to mind and recognized as the former.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Susan Swanson

    A quick but impactful read. It's a blessing that Zak had turned out to be a beautiful human despite so much hatred and violence in his life. Break the circle, it's be done. A quick but impactful read. It's a blessing that Zak had turned out to be a beautiful human despite so much hatred and violence in his life. Break the circle, it's be done.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Clay P.

    I believe that the authors purpose in writing The Terrorist's Son is to show, and teach that the path that leads to love and peace is often found due to brutality from others. This memoir is written from the point of view of Zak Ebrahim. Characters include Zak's father El-Sayyid Nossair, Zak's mother, and Zak's stepfather Ahmed. Zak Ebrahim is a young boy who loves his family. All of his family is having a hard time, with money, bullying, and just being Muslim. When Zak's father is accused of a I believe that the authors purpose in writing The Terrorist's Son is to show, and teach that the path that leads to love and peace is often found due to brutality from others. This memoir is written from the point of view of Zak Ebrahim. Characters include Zak's father El-Sayyid Nossair, Zak's mother, and Zak's stepfather Ahmed. Zak Ebrahim is a young boy who loves his family. All of his family is having a hard time, with money, bullying, and just being Muslim. When Zak's father is accused of a crime he did not commit, Zak's father goes into a deep depression. Months later, Nossair begins plotting. When Nossair kills a Jewish man by the name of Rabbi Kahane, he is thrown in jail. A few years later Ebrahim is introduced to brutality in the form of his step-father Ahmed. This book is about how Zak Ebrahim must choose what kind of person he wants to be. Ebrahim writes“My father lost his way—but that didn’t stop me from finding mine." This quote shows that while Mr. Ebrahim was bullied, influenced by his father, and brutally beaten by his step-dad, it did not stop him from pursuing happiness, his own ideas, and above all else, peace. This idea that Zak Ebrahim displays in this book is very unique, and beautiful at the same time. It is much like the ideas displayed in the everyday life of 12 and 13 year olds. No one MUST follow in their parents footsteps, and that can often be a good thing. I enjoyed this book very much and would recommend it to anyone that thinks they would enjoy a short, thought provoking read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    My only complaint about this book is that I wish it were longer. I understand what TED is trying to do with its publishing arm--bring to book form the compelling talks that are the hallmark of TED. But some topics deserve more than the novella length, and this is one of them. Ebrahim has a fascinating story; he grew up as the son of a terrorist. His father was convicted of murdering a renowned rabbi in New York and also helped plan the 1993 World Trade Center bombing from his jail cell. Ebrahim w My only complaint about this book is that I wish it were longer. I understand what TED is trying to do with its publishing arm--bring to book form the compelling talks that are the hallmark of TED. But some topics deserve more than the novella length, and this is one of them. Ebrahim has a fascinating story; he grew up as the son of a terrorist. His father was convicted of murdering a renowned rabbi in New York and also helped plan the 1993 World Trade Center bombing from his jail cell. Ebrahim was only seven years old when his father went to jail, and his life was filled with frequent moves, bullying, and abuse at the hands of a stepfather. Because of the short length of the book, Ebrahim only skims the surface of events. Once in a while, he's able to dive down briefly, but then he's back up at surface level. While this was a quick read, I was left in the end wanting more. I guess it's better to wish a book were longer than having to plow through an overly long book. But the people at TED should have recognized this rich story and have allowed Ebrahim to fully develop this as a memoir.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Suhasini Srihari

    A heart touching write-up. The story of a bigot's son, who had to face such humiliations at a very age just because he bore his father's name. In spite of all the traumas and depressions, Z could hold on to having a hope to hope! A son, whom some thought, would continue in his father's footsteps, turned out to be otherwise. The sense of humanity and suffering that he was exposed to poured in him real truth of life, and that family is indeed of greater value than religion. I couldn't agree less w A heart touching write-up. The story of a bigot's son, who had to face such humiliations at a very age just because he bore his father's name. In spite of all the traumas and depressions, Z could hold on to having a hope to hope! A son, whom some thought, would continue in his father's footsteps, turned out to be otherwise. The sense of humanity and suffering that he was exposed to poured in him real truth of life, and that family is indeed of greater value than religion. I couldn't agree less with Z when he actually mentioned that religions today are used as 'weapons'. Yes, this is the harsh reality. However, he conveys no disrespect to any faiths but only abhors those who make religion their weapons. I read the book after watching Zak conveying his emotions on one of the TED talks. The book was a fairly quick read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Oleksiy Kovyrin

    Inspiring and depressing at the same time... Inspiring to see this kid escaping the brainwashing culture of bigotry and hate, but depressing to see his own mother subject him to all of that shit. I do not care about her beliefs, no mother should just sit and watch her children abused and brainwashed for years and not do anything. She wasn't in Egypt or AOE - she's a fucking US-born American woman! What stopped her from telling the step-father to take a hike and just going out to make a living li Inspiring and depressing at the same time... Inspiring to see this kid escaping the brainwashing culture of bigotry and hate, but depressing to see his own mother subject him to all of that shit. I do not care about her beliefs, no mother should just sit and watch her children abused and brainwashed for years and not do anything. She wasn't in Egypt or AOE - she's a fucking US-born American woman! What stopped her from telling the step-father to take a hike and just going out to make a living like millions of other single mothers do? I don't know, going out to work? Instead, she's spent years leeching off of "donations" to her terrorist husband only to go and marry another random piece-of-shit guy just because he claimed to share her faith... Disgusting passivity in the name of faith! Not the most flattering story for people claiming Islam is a peaceful religion of family values...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Angelea

    I loved the idea for this book, but it left me wanting to know so much more. I didn't find out until after I picked it for book club that it was only 100 pages. It reads more like a long magazine article than the book I expected. I hope Zak Ebrahim will go back to it someday and fill in the blanks with more detail and stories about what his life was like after his father went to prison, while his mother was raising him and his siblings alone, and later with his stepfather. I would love to have r I loved the idea for this book, but it left me wanting to know so much more. I didn't find out until after I picked it for book club that it was only 100 pages. It reads more like a long magazine article than the book I expected. I hope Zak Ebrahim will go back to it someday and fill in the blanks with more detail and stories about what his life was like after his father went to prison, while his mother was raising him and his siblings alone, and later with his stepfather. I would love to have read more about Ebrahim's thoughts and feelings. He gives us little snippets, but just enough to have whet my appetite for more. I did like what I read, it just wasn't enough for me.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hanna

    You cannot choose your family. For most of us, that can be mildly annoying at Christmas but then again most of our fathers are not terrorists. Meet Z, who is not as lucky. What does it feel like to be condemned for someone else's crimes? What is it like to grow up in the shadow of a man who did awful things? And how do you develop a working moral compass in such a situation? Zak Ebrahim managed to get through all of that, miraculously, without being pulled into extremism himself. Impressive read You cannot choose your family. For most of us, that can be mildly annoying at Christmas but then again most of our fathers are not terrorists. Meet Z, who is not as lucky. What does it feel like to be condemned for someone else's crimes? What is it like to grow up in the shadow of a man who did awful things? And how do you develop a working moral compass in such a situation? Zak Ebrahim managed to get through all of that, miraculously, without being pulled into extremism himself. Impressive read!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Heidi The Reader

    A powerful testament to the strength of a person's inner voice in the face of an unimaginable upbringing and life circumstance. The part of this that was the most meaningful to me is when he talked about how "bigotry cannot withstand your own experience. I learned the difference between what I was being taught and how people really are by walking out my front door." (Paraphrased, not a direct quote) A powerful testament to the strength of a person's inner voice in the face of an unimaginable upbringing and life circumstance. The part of this that was the most meaningful to me is when he talked about how "bigotry cannot withstand your own experience. I learned the difference between what I was being taught and how people really are by walking out my front door." (Paraphrased, not a direct quote)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Miz

    Wow. Like many others I was drawn to this book After watching the author's TED talk. Powerful stuff - murderous rage and bigotry is learned; it is not something that is innate in human nature. powerful stuff with a brave man. https://www.ted.com/talks/zak_ebrahim... Wow. Like many others I was drawn to this book After watching the author's TED talk. Powerful stuff - murderous rage and bigotry is learned; it is not something that is innate in human nature. powerful stuff with a brave man. https://www.ted.com/talks/zak_ebrahim...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Thinn

    A heart breaking book. The love and hope that Z brought through out his childhood and believing his father when he was young. Things fall apart when he realize the truth from his beloved mother. A great story. The last long break my heart "We are not his children anymore." A heart breaking book. The love and hope that Z brought through out his childhood and believing his father when he was young. Things fall apart when he realize the truth from his beloved mother. A great story. The last long break my heart "We are not his children anymore."

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sooraya Evans

    Great pacing and in plain simple English. Would be great to have more details, though...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sierra

    The Terrorist’s Son By:Zak Ebrahim Book reviewed By: Sierra LeeAnn Christian Imagine that you wake up in the middle of the night to find out that your father has been arrested, then later that day you find out he has been arrested and charged with acts of terrorism. How would you feel? Well sadly for Zak Ebrahim this terrible thing happened to him, and he had to deal with it in a different way than others. He chooses to tell his story in his memoir, The Terrorist’s Son. I gave the book The Terrori The Terrorist’s Son By:Zak Ebrahim Book reviewed By: Sierra LeeAnn Christian Imagine that you wake up in the middle of the night to find out that your father has been arrested, then later that day you find out he has been arrested and charged with acts of terrorism. How would you feel? Well sadly for Zak Ebrahim this terrible thing happened to him, and he had to deal with it in a different way than others. He chooses to tell his story in his memoir, The Terrorist’s Son. I gave the book The Terrorist's Son a 4 star rating because i think that the book was very informing. I say this because the book gives a lot of sign and things to look for to become a terrorist. It also gives you ways on how to make a terrorist or how a terrorist is formed. I think that this would be good information to know because then you can see if someone is in trouble and turning into one and then you can tell someone. One connection that i can make in depth about is how after Ebrahim finds out the things that his father was doing he didn't have the best connection with him. Ebrahim struggles with this, especially when he sees Ahmed: ”Ahmed is not a murderer like my father, but within the walls of our apartment—among people he claims to love—he is every inch a terrorist.” (Ebrahim) I feel like i can connect with this because when i found out the things my father has done in my or his life span i didn't have the best relationship. Like when i found out the things that my father has done to my mother and my family i understand how he feels and what he's going through. Also i can see how he could have been teased when everyone found out what his father has done because when people found out what my dad's record was i was bullied and i didn't really like it . The book The Terrorist's Son talks about a lot of interesting things such as how terrorist are formed and basically the steps.In the book it states” You find someone vulnerable - someone who's lost his confidence, his income, his pride, his agency. Someone who feels humiliated by life. And then you isolate him. You fill him with fear and fury, and you see to it that he regards anybody who's different as a faceless target” (Ebrahim 34) This quote just explains that you can do a lot of thing to become a terrorist and these steps will show you how they are made and how people do it. I recommend this book because it gives you a great experience and demonstration on how that little boy's life was, and it just helps you understand that not everyone is going through the same thing and sometime other people's lives are harder. I think that a reader like likes history and like when there are explanations would really like this book.I would compare the book to (Terrorist by John Updike). I can just say that the book is a very informing and it talks about very informing things. THank you and i hope you read this book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nadia

    This book is full of love and hope. This book is about very strong boy who didn't give up and found strength to let go of everything he was taught during his childhood and teen-years and made choice for himself. It is close to Escape in showing readers inside world of a closed community. And it also show us the same thing -- it becomes possible to weaponize people when you cut their ties with outside world and start to brainwash them in a vacuum. When they know nothing, see nothing and cannot cr This book is full of love and hope. This book is about very strong boy who didn't give up and found strength to let go of everything he was taught during his childhood and teen-years and made choice for himself. It is close to Escape in showing readers inside world of a closed community. And it also show us the same thing -- it becomes possible to weaponize people when you cut their ties with outside world and start to brainwash them in a vacuum. When they know nothing, see nothing and cannot critically analyze what you teach them -- then you control them. And of course fear always work. No matter what they made to fear. Also you can hate an abstract Jew, gay or others. It's hard to demonize person and make you hate him(her) once you know him(her) personally. Then you can see that they are not demons at all. They are just like you.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Uth

    I enjoyed reading about Zak and his family's side of the story. I liked connecting it to the TED talk that we watched because of all the similarities between them. I enjoyed reading about Zak and his family's side of the story. I liked connecting it to the TED talk that we watched because of all the similarities between them.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    Some parts could have been elaborated more. Not particularly a exciting story.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chrissa Kuntz

    Can't wait to put it on the shelf in my classroom! Can't wait to put it on the shelf in my classroom!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sally Wilson

    Thoroughly enjoyed this book, read it in 3 hrs.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Parker

    This book was really short but still long enough to get the author’s point across: just because you’re brought up to hate doesn’t mean you have to do it.

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