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The Fringe Hours: Making Time for You

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Every woman has had this experience: you get to the end of the day and realize you did nothing for you. And if you go days, weeks, or even months in this cycle, you begin to feel like you have lost a bit of yourself. While life is busy with a litany of must-dos--work, child-rearing, keeping house, grocery shopping, laundry and on and on--women do not have to push their own Every woman has had this experience: you get to the end of the day and realize you did nothing for you. And if you go days, weeks, or even months in this cycle, you begin to feel like you have lost a bit of yourself. While life is busy with a litany of must-dos--work, child-rearing, keeping house, grocery shopping, laundry and on and on--women do not have to push their own needs aside. Yet this is often what happens. There's just no time, right? Wrong. In this practical and liberating book, Jessica Turner empowers women to take back pockets of time "they already have "in their day in order to practice self-care and do the things they love. Turner uses her own experiences and those of women across the country to teach readers how to balance their many responsibilities while still taking time to invest in themselves. She also addresses barriers to this lifestyle, such as comparison and guilt, and demonstrates how eliminating these feelings and making changes to one's schedule will make the reader a better wife, mother, and friend. Perfect for any woman who is doing everything for everyone--except herself--"The Fringe Hours" is ideal for both individuals and small group use.


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Every woman has had this experience: you get to the end of the day and realize you did nothing for you. And if you go days, weeks, or even months in this cycle, you begin to feel like you have lost a bit of yourself. While life is busy with a litany of must-dos--work, child-rearing, keeping house, grocery shopping, laundry and on and on--women do not have to push their own Every woman has had this experience: you get to the end of the day and realize you did nothing for you. And if you go days, weeks, or even months in this cycle, you begin to feel like you have lost a bit of yourself. While life is busy with a litany of must-dos--work, child-rearing, keeping house, grocery shopping, laundry and on and on--women do not have to push their own needs aside. Yet this is often what happens. There's just no time, right? Wrong. In this practical and liberating book, Jessica Turner empowers women to take back pockets of time "they already have "in their day in order to practice self-care and do the things they love. Turner uses her own experiences and those of women across the country to teach readers how to balance their many responsibilities while still taking time to invest in themselves. She also addresses barriers to this lifestyle, such as comparison and guilt, and demonstrates how eliminating these feelings and making changes to one's schedule will make the reader a better wife, mother, and friend. Perfect for any woman who is doing everything for everyone--except herself--"The Fringe Hours" is ideal for both individuals and small group use.

30 review for The Fringe Hours: Making Time for You

  1. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    EDIT: as I'm still getting likes on this review, I would like to update it to say I had my first child in July 2018, so I am chock full of motherly and matronly wisdom, and this book still sucks. This book just didn't click for me. It is probably because I don't have any children, and if I do have children some day I'm pretty sure I'll have zero compunction about telling them to go fuck off because I want some alone-time. My (stay-at-home) mom I know had little problem with this, she used to jus EDIT: as I'm still getting likes on this review, I would like to update it to say I had my first child in July 2018, so I am chock full of motherly and matronly wisdom, and this book still sucks. This book just didn't click for me. It is probably because I don't have any children, and if I do have children some day I'm pretty sure I'll have zero compunction about telling them to go fuck off because I want some alone-time. My (stay-at-home) mom I know had little problem with this, she used to just shut us outside for the morning and tell us to keep in sight of the windows. We were a bit disdainful of that rule anyway, and once I was deemed "old enough" my sister and I were allowed just go tromp around unobservable for hours in the wet Indiana woods, on the thinking that two children can probably look after each other or something. The 90s were the final days of wide cultural acceptance for free-range childrearing in America though, and they are unlikely to return. And I'm not immune to the cultural shift - I'd certainly never even dream to let a tween tootle around the Internet un-monitored like I was. But will my more hovering parenting really be better? I don't know. What I'm getting at is that there's a bigger cultural problem lying as an undercurrent in the narrative of this book, which is that modern upper middle-class mothers who work full-time feel intense guilt for not spending every spare hour they have with their children. Which is a very natural mental friction to have happening when you think about it: because we have children growing ever more precious in the American consciousness, with the side evolution of mainstream stay-at-home mothers becoming ever more rare, and the evolution in American masculinities decidedly not keeping up. The book spends a lot of time trying not to assuage that guilt at its core, but coming at it from the side - taking time for yourself is good because it makes you a better wife and mother. Thaz some scary shit. It's unhealthy to take your primary identity from your children or your marriage, or really any external thing. I wanted to chant the Fight Club mantra at this book - you are not your job, you are not your kids, you are not your marriage, you are not your fucking khakis... While the titles "wife" and "mother" may be culturally synonymous with unending noble labor and sacrifice, you don't have to buy into it. If you want to spend your evening drinking box wine and scrapbooking while your house is filthy and your kids eat dinosaur chicken nuggets for dinner after a full day at their cut-rate daycare, just do it: other people may own most of your time, but you still own your own soul. Also, this book is a Christian book, fair warning. It's labeled as one on Amazon but not on Goodreads or Netgalley, else I wouldn't have requested it. The Christian elements are fairly milquetoast and inoffensive, but do run right-of-center, if you hadn't guessed from the content above, but like one of the anonymous example women mentions American Girls or whatever that holy-roller version of Girls Scouts is called. So there's that. But enough back of the napkin sociology. Can this book help you squeeze more out of your day? Well, maybe, maybe not. If you're the sort of person who has a bad habit of overextending yourself with social and volunteer commitments for your children, and you need someone to pitch to you why you deserve your own scraps of life, yes you will probably get something out of this. I was disappointed to discover that I am already apparently using my day to its fullest by the author's measures, I have no more time to spare. Tips like "keep a book in your purse so you can read when you're waiting at doctor's offices," are pretty useless to most people who don't just stare blankly into space most of the day. Who the hell doesn't keep a book in their purse? Nobody who enjoys reading I'm guessing. Sometimes I keep two books in my purse, in case the first one is bad or something. I hope this is the right book for someone, some imaginary Christian mom of three who works an office job all day and just needs permission to go drink wine at a knitting circle one night a week and hear a few non-Spongebob laughs. I hope she gets that. But unfortunately just not a book for me. I received a reviewer's copy of this book on Netgalley.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    I had a lot of thoughts and feelings after this book. But it isn't Turner's fault. She writes beautifully and the book made me feel better when I held it. But it is hard when the lesson is being given by someone who actually still does it all. ALL. Turner is a formidable role model in the world of Supermom. Although she eschews the pop culture image, she kind of is the image. In fact, her bio short on her website says that she is guilty of juggling too much and loving it. I think I am tired of ju I had a lot of thoughts and feelings after this book. But it isn't Turner's fault. She writes beautifully and the book made me feel better when I held it. But it is hard when the lesson is being given by someone who actually still does it all. ALL. Turner is a formidable role model in the world of Supermom. Although she eschews the pop culture image, she kind of is the image. In fact, her bio short on her website says that she is guilty of juggling too much and loving it. I think I am tired of juggling. In fact, the further I explore this parenting gig, the more I realize the juggle just isn’t worth it at all. In the end, I guess, I feel like The Fringe Hours is just another BandAid to a bigger problem: that we all want it all and we aren’t even really sure what “all” means. We expect moms to do it all, to squeeze every single last minute out of every single last day so that we can check off everything from kids to marriage to household to career to self-care. You can read all of my thoughts and feelings here - https://thefamilytriponline.com/2019/...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ioana

    I requested (and was given this advanced reading copy of) this book with a skeptical heart, as I do with most books. I knew and Jessica Turner's writing style since I have been following her blog and her social media sites for a few years. However, I was a bit skeptical on what she was going to write in so many thousands of words about the topic she chose for her first book. Honestly, this is probably the best topic she could have chosen. Her book addresses to the over busy woman, the one that ha I requested (and was given this advanced reading copy of) this book with a skeptical heart, as I do with most books. I knew and Jessica Turner's writing style since I have been following her blog and her social media sites for a few years. However, I was a bit skeptical on what she was going to write in so many thousands of words about the topic she chose for her first book. Honestly, this is probably the best topic she could have chosen. Her book addresses to the over busy woman, the one that has too many things on her to do list, and hardly ever has time to engage in and focus on activities that bring her joy. My skepticism was born from the thought that maybe this was another "mom book", that is, it was written for the wife and mom with kids engaged in a million activities, the mom who works and does all the important things that must be done, overlooking her own hobbies. Well, this is true to a point. I am none of the above. But I, too, (and my skepticism) were confronted with some very well pointed ideas. And I have been won over. Fringe hours are those little pockets of time throughout the day that often go underused or are wasted altogether. If not intentionally redeemed, fringe hours slip through one's fingers like sand. (p.84) In researching for this book, Jessica also posted a survey on her blog. More than 2500 women completed the survey. These women were from all stated of US and from nearly 30 countries. This shows to me that this issue is worldwide and it's applicable to all. One thing that I think is a bit out of range for those living outside US are the links and sites she mentions that can offer certain services such as cooking, cleaning, etc. However, I am sure alternative solutions could be found. The book is structured in four main parts, each part having three or four subheadings. The four main parts are: Explore, Discover, Maximize, Live Well. She makes a case for how important it is to make time for the things that you like, and then she offers suggestions. All these were helpful tips and strategies in helping us find the things that we long to do, but always put on hold, or say we don't have to for. Not to mention, sometimes even our hobbies can be postponed due to procrastination. It's so much easier to just turn on the TV, the laptop, the phone and spend valuable minutes connected, but without feeling energized in the end. Fringe hours, short as they may be, can have a lasting effect and impact. Throughout the book there are questions inserted and some blank space is left for answers. The questions aim to help each reader think more deeply about her life and her context, and eventually to be more able to make time and do the things she loves. As you read the book, it feels like she repeats the same things, like a mantra, but it's totally understandable. I for one only believe and actually get to doing if someone repeats the same thing over and over. And probably some of those who read this book are the same. The quotes she picked for this book are so well chosen. She clearly knows her topic well, and her research is thorough. All in all, this is a positive book. I was afraid it will be just a feel good, mushy kind of book, but it's not! It's grounded in reality. Each person's reality is different, but each reality can be molded so that fringe hours can be found in it. A recommended read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    I enjoyed listening to Jessica Turner be interviewed on two different podcasts and was inspired by what she had to say and agreed with her message. However, I did not find her book to be as inspiring as listening to her. I find this to be the case sometimes. I really enjoy a speaker but that doesn't transfer to their writing. Perhaps this is because the first two sections were devoted to trying to persuade women that making time for their gifts is important. I already whole-heartedly agree with t I enjoyed listening to Jessica Turner be interviewed on two different podcasts and was inspired by what she had to say and agreed with her message. However, I did not find her book to be as inspiring as listening to her. I find this to be the case sometimes. I really enjoy a speaker but that doesn't transfer to their writing. Perhaps this is because the first two sections were devoted to trying to persuade women that making time for their gifts is important. I already whole-heartedly agree with this, so those sections weren't really written for me. I DO think women need to be encouraged in this way though. Turner added this into her book based on the survey results she received. And I've noticed friends on Facebook say "I need a hobby" "I don't even know what I like to do anymore" etc. My own mom shared with me that even after working a full day of work, having no kids at home to care for, she still "feels guilty" to sit down and read. The book does deal with these ideas of self-imposed guilt that women seem to carry with them. But back to me, honestly I find myself already doing much of the suggestions Turner has to offer. Not that I've got it all together, but maybe this was written more for someone starting out on a journey making time for themselves as opposed to someone who already does. I already make time for myself each morning before my kids get up for personal devotional time and then many afternoons during the week during "rest time" to pursue my writing. Since I've been doing this my kids were born I feel like I've got a good handle on it. And I also already know what I'm passionate about and don't need to brain storm what my interests are. Also, this books was written from a Christian perspective but I don't think it was necessarily was billed as such. I think it was trying to ride the fence a bit. I think it would have benefitted from a whole chapter on the theology of using and developing one's gifts and going deeper into that from a Christian perspective, or maybe not have any Christian references at all? Not sure. She discusses spiritual disciplines, church, prayer, etc. but doesn't delve deeply into any of that, so not sure if it was necessary. In some ways I feel like the book tried to be a little too broad in some areas. So all that to say, I don't think I was really the audience for this book. However, if someone has trouble with guilt, wants to pursue some sort of passion and doesn't know where/how to start, this would probably be a good book for them.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    I have mixed feelings about this book. I agree with the message that we as women need to make time for ourselves and that we take on too much at a time. We lose sight of ourselves and spend our time taking care of everyone else at the expense of our own needs. This book was written as a means of overcoming that and finding the time we need or time for "self-care" as the author puts it. I totally agree and appreciate some of the suggestions Turner makes for how to do that. As I read the book, how I have mixed feelings about this book. I agree with the message that we as women need to make time for ourselves and that we take on too much at a time. We lose sight of ourselves and spend our time taking care of everyone else at the expense of our own needs. This book was written as a means of overcoming that and finding the time we need or time for "self-care" as the author puts it. I totally agree and appreciate some of the suggestions Turner makes for how to do that. As I read the book, however, I felt sad that women are still expected to keep home and hearth, all the while juggling work/career, children, husband, and self. This is why we need feminism. However that was not a theme of this book, nor did it take a feminist approach. Turner is no Betty Friedan. Asking for help should have been stressed throughout, but it was not a major theme either. Yes, it was offered as a solution but only as an option and at one point advice was given on how to delicately bring this up with our husbands so as not to create animosity or anger. Again, this is why we need feminism. Instead, the book largely seemed to offer solutions to aid in the juggling process more and make it more efficient. Yes, you could ask your husband for help, but you could also just pay for a maid, childcare, and/or food prep. That bothered me. I really want to remind you that this is why we need feminism, but I don't want to belabor the point. Oh wait...oops. I also had a problem with the Christian tone of the book. The book was not billed as Christian or advertised as such. Yet, the author clearly wrote this with a Christian audience in mind. There are not only references to scripture and Christian dogma throughout the book, but entire sections focused on prayer and church as solutions and methods of self-care. It was easy to skip and ignore, but i would not have purchased the book had I known it would feature so prominently. That said, I do feel the book is useful and appreciate the suggestions and tips towards making my time and needs important. Most of it is obvious, but obviously we as women need reminding.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    I enjoyed reading this first book from Jessica Turner. I have followed her blog and social media for years. The book is a pretty fast read and offers plenty of space to stop and think about how you can apply the concepts. While I feel like I was already utilizing fringe hours (my daily 5am workouts!) Jessica helped me to see there are so many other fringe moments that I am not taking advantage off. The ten or fifteen minute pockets of time where I would normally waste on facebook could be better I enjoyed reading this first book from Jessica Turner. I have followed her blog and social media for years. The book is a pretty fast read and offers plenty of space to stop and think about how you can apply the concepts. While I feel like I was already utilizing fringe hours (my daily 5am workouts!) Jessica helped me to see there are so many other fringe moments that I am not taking advantage off. The ten or fifteen minute pockets of time where I would normally waste on facebook could be better spent pursuing the things that I love. The book has challenged me to find ways to fit my passions into those little pockets. I felt like the last section of the book on Living Well was a little glossed over but by the time I got to it, I had so many ideas in my head that I thought it was OK that the book didn't delve as deeply. Throughout the entire book, I found myself thinking about a dear friend who, like me, is a busy busy mama who often forgets to take care of herself and pursue the things that SHE loves. I'm going to lend my already dog-eared and margin-scribbled copy on to her.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    Here I am in some Fringe Hours doing something I love—taking time to think about what I’ve read and capture a few thoughts. I was pleasantly surprised at how many of the author, Jessica’s ideas about making time for important things, I actually do. I layer. I am never not prepared with something I enjoy doing if I have a spare minute. A book, or writing a note to someone, are my go tos. Purposeful multi-tasking is also something I enjoy…you will often find me folding laundry or doing cooking pre Here I am in some Fringe Hours doing something I love—taking time to think about what I’ve read and capture a few thoughts. I was pleasantly surprised at how many of the author, Jessica’s ideas about making time for important things, I actually do. I layer. I am never not prepared with something I enjoy doing if I have a spare minute. A book, or writing a note to someone, are my go tos. Purposeful multi-tasking is also something I enjoy…you will often find me folding laundry or doing cooking prep while on a conference call for work. (Working from home lends itself to that.) But she is right that you can’t combine two tasks that require the same type of energy. I have to remember that one sometimes when I think I can listen to a book and read an email at the same time. But—take note, Kindles are great for reading while on the treadmill…and audio books on my phone are my weight lifting partner. Other aspects of Jessica’s manifesto rang true to me too. I find great joy in my community and have been practicing my nighttime habit of gratitude just shy of 20 years now. Asking for help is rolling off my tongue more easily as I’ve gotten older and perhaps I’m just too self-absorbed, but I don’t struggle with comparison too much—and if I do, I have quickly developed ways to talk myself out of it. But just when I thought I was I was making the most of my fringe hours, we got to the chapter about rest and BAM—I realized that I really stink at that. Rest is something I’m not hard wired to do and something I’m trying to focus more on this year. Sometimes I find that always having my bag stocked with things to kill the time—and good things like a book or a card—can sometimes rob me of a chance to just be still. I have to be careful that my appetite for books doesn’t eat me alive. Up until recently, I thought I was allergic to being still. But through this book and during my favorite part of yoga (shavasana), I’ve come to appreciate the stillness and what it does to restore me. I’m excited to read the book she recommends about Sabbath and am going to continue to “schedule” in times to rest and take care of myself while striving to be more open to moments of stillness as they present themselves during the day. So even though there are some things I have figured out to maximize those Fringe Hours, I still have a lot to learn. I’m going to post this, and then go be still somewhere. Wish me luck.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rachel (TheShadesofOrange)

    2.0 Stars I checked out this book because I love reading about time management and work-life balance. However, this book fell short of my expectations. I felt like the book didn't add any new ideas and most of the advice was very generalized. I did appreciate some sections, which hit home, such as the importance of saying 'no' and prioritizing the activities I most value. The book included numerous quotes from the author's blog followers, which I found pretty uninteresting. If I wanted to read bl 2.0 Stars I checked out this book because I love reading about time management and work-life balance. However, this book fell short of my expectations. I felt like the book didn't add any new ideas and most of the advice was very generalized. I did appreciate some sections, which hit home, such as the importance of saying 'no' and prioritizing the activities I most value. The book included numerous quotes from the author's blog followers, which I found pretty uninteresting. If I wanted to read blog comments, I would read her blog. Also, the book is written about from a Christian perspective, with sections dedicated to making time for prayer, which probably should've been advertised in the marketing write up. Personally, I would recommend 168 Hours by Laura Vanderkam, which I feel is a more useful time management book because it includes more specific, practical advice.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alissa

    Here's the deal. I don't really need to read books like this because I actually do most of what she suggests. And I didn't like the tone of the book. And how she kept referring to the survey. However, I do think this book would be helpful for some women. But I prefer "168 Hours" as a better paradigm shift on using your time.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen E.

    Tuesday, March 17, 2015 The Fringe Hours: Making Time for You by Jessica N. Turner, © 2015 Just because something is a good thing doesn’t mean it is good for this moment in your life. --The Fringe Hours: Making Time for You, 31 So much wisdom in this statement. We think we have to do it all. The seasons in your life will bring many pleasures. Don't get knotted in the "woulda', coulda', shoulda', oughta'" regrets and looking back, wishing a do-over. Enjoy your today, where you are. Don't sacrifice fa Tuesday, March 17, 2015 The Fringe Hours: Making Time for You by Jessica N. Turner, © 2015 Just because something is a good thing doesn’t mean it is good for this moment in your life. --The Fringe Hours: Making Time for You, 31 So much wisdom in this statement. We think we have to do it all. The seasons in your life will bring many pleasures. Don't get knotted in the "woulda', coulda', shoulda', oughta'" regrets and looking back, wishing a do-over. Enjoy your today, where you are. Don't sacrifice family for multitasking activities and others' to-do-list requests. Once. Your family will be at this stage of time, once. Overcommitment robs you of n~o~w. Choose joy. Recognize and embrace what God has created in you ~ gifts and talents, and a desire to pursue what you are passionate about. Jessica surveyed 2,000 women and compiled responses, sharing priorities including refreshment optimum to health for you and your family ~ committing to include yourself in rest and what you enjoy. Time is going to continue whether you wish to, or do set aside moments. Being intentional on how you spend your time ~* your fringe hours *~ little pockets of time, on purpose. Why We Need Community: Making time for you is not always about making time to do something by yourself. It is also important for women to be in community. The Fringe Hours: Making Time for You ~ So many woman-to-woman topics ~ making a change to eliminate time wasters; cultivating balance; recognizing what really matters; prioritizing relationships; living in your season. Benefits worth sharing. Her website has a free weekly time tracker to use as a regular personal resource to help you find, plan, and maximize your fringe hours. Live a life of joy. ***Thank you to Revell for sending me a copy of Jessica N. Turner's The Fringe Hours: Making Time for You. This review was written in my own words. No other compensation was received.***

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn Day

    The message of this book is so important. Self-care: we need to do more of it. Though the book talks to mothers specifically, self-care is a global need. We need to try and find the time to make ourselves feel whole again. A great message. A noble message, even. Unfortunately, this book is too trite to do more than scratch the surface of the problem. It’s incredibly vanilla and also assumes pretty significant reader privilege–it reads like one long, Pinterest-friendly blog post. The thesis here The message of this book is so important. Self-care: we need to do more of it. Though the book talks to mothers specifically, self-care is a global need. We need to try and find the time to make ourselves feel whole again. A great message. A noble message, even. Unfortunately, this book is too trite to do more than scratch the surface of the problem. It’s incredibly vanilla and also assumes pretty significant reader privilege–it reads like one long, Pinterest-friendly blog post. The thesis here is that we can find time in our day for ourselves, though we may not see it now. A few minutes in the school drop-off/pick-up line. A couple hours in the evening after the kids are in bed. Waking up earlier to get more done. Just saying, hey, I need to get out of the house for a few hours! Bye! These are good suggestions, but they assume that the woman in question has a partner to help or the resources to allow for extracurricular “me time” or a job that finishes promptly at 5 pm. Or earlier! Additionally, if you don’t love religious overtones, know that there are some initially sneaky and, later, overt references to the importance of faith, etc. With all that in mind, there is a specific audience for this book–Christian, privileged, partnered mothers, who maybe work or maybe don’t work (if they do, it’s mostly because they want to), who have ample support and resources for breathing room of the emotional and financial variety. There is an important book to be written about the topic of self-care. It’s just not this book. Despite my agreeing with the overall message of this particular book, it was too generic and presumptuous to make an impact. Thank you to Revell for the opportunity to read this in exchange for a review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Georgina

    The premise of the book is sound - people these days are trying to cram so much into their lives that the quietude of both diary and soul required to focus on re-creation is never found. There are a ton of books available on restructuring your life in order to achieve a sense of fulfilment, and most of them do the same thing - they give you lots of anecdotes and a bucket of homilies alongside instructions to write down memories of when you were happy, lists of things that you like, don't like, a The premise of the book is sound - people these days are trying to cram so much into their lives that the quietude of both diary and soul required to focus on re-creation is never found. There are a ton of books available on restructuring your life in order to achieve a sense of fulfilment, and most of them do the same thing - they give you lots of anecdotes and a bucket of homilies alongside instructions to write down memories of when you were happy, lists of things that you like, don't like, are good at, blah blah blah. For another book on the subject to shine like a beacon through the fog, it has to do what the others don't and address real lives, and the real issues that stop many people from achieving balance and creativity. This book isn't that beacon. It addresses the lives of middle-class Christian women. If you aren't that, but you can be bothered to wade through the often banal, sometimes trite, often simplistic anecdotes you will find some interesting information - such as the idea that busyness has become an emblem of status, hence the jam-packed run-around that is many people's weekly schedule and the schedule they impose upon their music-studying, dance-classed, sport-trained, hot-house-educated children. Maybe, just maybe, you might be male, or single, childless, unemployed, low-waged, Buddhist, Muslim, Pagan or none of these but much, much more and yet unable to eke out creative time. If so look elsewhere for help and inspiration. I received a copy of this book from NetGalley, in return for an unbiased review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Angela Sangalang

    In this season of my life, a lot of Jessica Turner's suggestions do not apply to me, but I still found her book very helpful and know that it would continue to be a tremendous help as I move into different seasons of life. The parts that applied to me have helped me gain new perspectives on life and my attitudes on life. Turner did a lot of research and interviews for this book, which are incorporated seamlessly in the overall story she tells. It's great to read direct quotes from many women abo In this season of my life, a lot of Jessica Turner's suggestions do not apply to me, but I still found her book very helpful and know that it would continue to be a tremendous help as I move into different seasons of life. The parts that applied to me have helped me gain new perspectives on life and my attitudes on life. Turner did a lot of research and interviews for this book, which are incorporated seamlessly in the overall story she tells. It's great to read direct quotes from many women about the similar struggles we face. Turner also offers many practical advice, tips, and how-tos that anyone can start practicing right away. She wrote a book with a great balance in inspiration and practicality. When reading this book, I participated with (in)courage's Bloom book study with Turner and four other women. Their discussion is worth watching!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Swann

    Really enjoyed this! I have noticed that during my daily routines, I'm recognizing my free time and how I'm spending my fringe hours. I'm making better decisions on what to do and when and really trying to eliminate my wasted time. Not all of these practices are a reality for me, but we are all different. I really did enjoy this!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Paschall

    I don’t think the book offers any revolutionary truths, at least for me and probably many of you. But it does make a solid case for why women need to carve out time to pursue their passions. This book would be great to place in the hands of a woman you know who gives, gives, gives without ever thinking of herself. A woman who might even consider it just wrong to do something for herself. This woman needs The Fringe Hours. I have a couple issues with the book. One is that she repeatedly refers to I don’t think the book offers any revolutionary truths, at least for me and probably many of you. But it does make a solid case for why women need to carve out time to pursue their passions. This book would be great to place in the hands of a woman you know who gives, gives, gives without ever thinking of herself. A woman who might even consider it just wrong to do something for herself. This woman needs The Fringe Hours. I have a couple issues with the book. One is that she repeatedly refers to her survey, as if it was the ultimate source for understanding contemporary woman’s lifestyle. Also, I struggled to see if this was wholeheartedly Christian, or just written to appeal to that Christian niche market. Since it’s marketed as “Christian,” I’ve got to address this issue: There’s a beautiful Gospel truth that she neglects: While seeing our great need for “me time,” we cannot lose sight that Christ, the master servant, spent most of us his life (not all of it–he definitely took breaks) serving others. I felt a little reticence as I read line after line praising time for me because, truly, it’s not my time. It’s God’s time that he’s given me, and while he wants me to take care of myself, He also wants me to see balance and the beautiful rejuvenation that comes from an overflow of Jesus that enables me to beautifully sacrifice my desires and my time for others. To show Christ in my fringe hours. While she devotes a couple paragraphs to the importance of prayer, this book overall fails to reflect on that greatest Hope–that in our hours where we fail to find fringe, there is a much greater rest that can be found in Christ. Full review found on embracingthechapters.com (http://wp.me/p5F44u-2M)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I once had a boss who said the way to measure whether or not it had been worth going to a conference was if at the end you walked away with even just one really good idea to put into practice. That's how I'll measure "The Fringe Hours." The premise of the book centers on the notion that mothers MUST make time for their own pursuits and self-care, lest they completely burn-out. For some people this might be a revelation, but most of my contemporaries (and their partners) are on-board with this phi I once had a boss who said the way to measure whether or not it had been worth going to a conference was if at the end you walked away with even just one really good idea to put into practice. That's how I'll measure "The Fringe Hours." The premise of the book centers on the notion that mothers MUST make time for their own pursuits and self-care, lest they completely burn-out. For some people this might be a revelation, but most of my contemporaries (and their partners) are on-board with this philosophy. Turner addresses the need to let go of perfectionism, why you can't say "yes" to every volunteer request that comes your way, why you need to "good-bye" to guilt, etc. She talks about different seasons of life, and the legitimacy of paying or bartering for help in order to free up time (without feeling guilty about it). We each have our strengths, and areas where we could use help. Turner admittedly has a messy kitchen, but loves planning birthday parties for her kids. My kitchen is clean, but the thought of planning an at-home birthday party for my kids gives me nightmares! Thankfully, Turner's book offers plenty of suggestions across the spectrum no matter where your "challenge spot" might be. This meets my "one good idea" threshold and made it a worthwhile (and quick) read for me.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Teri Underwood

    In The Fringe Hours, Jessica writes honestly about why it matters that we make time for ourselves and offers some very practical ideas for how to carve out that time in the fringe hours of our days. Early in the book she writes, “When you make room in your schedule to breathe, you make room for you—and that is the key to discovering fringe hours.” Making room in my schedule for time to breathe … I love that and I believe it is a truth more women need to embrace. The Fringe Hours is like a conversat In The Fringe Hours, Jessica writes honestly about why it matters that we make time for ourselves and offers some very practical ideas for how to carve out that time in the fringe hours of our days. Early in the book she writes, “When you make room in your schedule to breathe, you make room for you—and that is the key to discovering fringe hours.” Making room in my schedule for time to breathe … I love that and I believe it is a truth more women need to embrace. The Fringe Hours is like a conversation with a friend who knows you well, who doesn’t judge your failures {no matter how large}, and who cheers on your successes {no matter how small}. With thought-provoking questions and a masterful blend of encouragement and challenge, Jessica invites women in every state and season and situation in life to embrace those fringe hours and redeem them for something beautiful. If you, like me, are longing to live well, to experience the abundance God offers, The Fringe Hours is a book you will love {and read more than once}. I wasn’t on Jessica’s launch team for this book and I’ve never even met her. I bought it with some of my Christmas money … and I’m so glad. I highly recommend The Fringe Hours.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Several bloggers that I follow recommended this book and it was a good read, full of good reminders. Written for mothers, Turner emphasized the importance of self-care, rest, and pursuing what makes you come alive. Her book truly is comprehensive as she begins with exploring and discovering what you are passionate about and pursue "if only...". Then, she offers ideas for maximizing time spent towards restoring oneself or pursuing one's passions. She concludes with "living well" - sharing sentime Several bloggers that I follow recommended this book and it was a good read, full of good reminders. Written for mothers, Turner emphasized the importance of self-care, rest, and pursuing what makes you come alive. Her book truly is comprehensive as she begins with exploring and discovering what you are passionate about and pursue "if only...". Then, she offers ideas for maximizing time spent towards restoring oneself or pursuing one's passions. She concludes with "living well" - sharing sentiments on community, rest, choosing well. This book reads like the Christian female companion to Essentialism by Greg McKweon, Both emphasized making wise choices on how one spends their time. McKweon focused more on work and productivity, while Turner focused more on the personal endeavors for mothers. I enjoyed Turner's book and liked her heavy inclusion of interviews and thoughts from others. The only hiccup I had was that it seemed very heavily written for middle-class/upper-class mothers, which sometimes made me cringe. I do understand that that's the place she's writing from though. Overall, a good read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Corie

    Oh how I wish I had read this book as a young wife/mother! Jessica Turner identified the guilt, pressure, jealousy, comparisons and doubts that plague women today and how they influence the ways we spend our time. Those of us with several different roles to juggle sacrifice time for ourselves in order to "be everything for everyone else." Our interests, hobbies, the things that make our hearts beat in anticipation and joy become sacrifices made in futile efforts to be the ideal wife, the best mo Oh how I wish I had read this book as a young wife/mother! Jessica Turner identified the guilt, pressure, jealousy, comparisons and doubts that plague women today and how they influence the ways we spend our time. Those of us with several different roles to juggle sacrifice time for ourselves in order to "be everything for everyone else." Our interests, hobbies, the things that make our hearts beat in anticipation and joy become sacrifices made in futile efforts to be the ideal wife, the best mommy, the most valuable employee. I appreciated the freedom and encouragement of Fringe Hours; the nudge to use time for my health, my enjoyment, and my goals. Although I have been incorporating many of Turner's suggestions for years (Kindle in my purse whenever I leave the house!) I appreciated the reminders that a healthier, happier me makes for a better wife, mother and friend.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Kesterson

    I'm going to find my fringe hours by NOT finishing this book. Too much emphasis on being superwoman and using every moment, mostly to have more time for "self-care". (She used that term so many times, I wanted to stab myself in the eye.) I was looking for something to help me feel less overwhelmed, not feeling the pressure to use every second. Or the other option, which was to ignore it all to take care of myself. Except I already know how to do that, and it's not working. I also felt many of ex I'm going to find my fringe hours by NOT finishing this book. Too much emphasis on being superwoman and using every moment, mostly to have more time for "self-care". (She used that term so many times, I wanted to stab myself in the eye.) I was looking for something to help me feel less overwhelmed, not feeling the pressure to use every second. Or the other option, which was to ignore it all to take care of myself. Except I already know how to do that, and it's not working. I also felt many of examples didn't fit for the average person: a friend who should maybe have her nanny help with the home schooling or take one less business trip, maybe hire a maid to do some chores, or talk to my executive coach (what even is that?!)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I often feel, as I'm sure plenty of people do, that there just aren't enough hours in the day and that I don't prioritize the things I want to do enough. This book gave great perspective on how important it is to set aside time for yourself, to spend in whatever way you see fit, while also giving great pointers on how to utilize down time, multitask, and be effective with the amount of time we're given with our busy schedules. The only problem I had with this book was that the majority of person I often feel, as I'm sure plenty of people do, that there just aren't enough hours in the day and that I don't prioritize the things I want to do enough. This book gave great perspective on how important it is to set aside time for yourself, to spend in whatever way you see fit, while also giving great pointers on how to utilize down time, multitask, and be effective with the amount of time we're given with our busy schedules. The only problem I had with this book was that the majority of personal stories and examples were centered around having children— while many of the situations were relatable, there were times when I felt a little isolated because I personally am not a mother.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mary Kenyon

    "I don't have time." Invariably in the writing workshops I teach, someone in the room will lament a lack of time for writing, usually a mom with young children. That is when I pull out a photo I had enlarged and laminated, and pass it around the room. There I am in 1994, sitting in front of a typewriter, a baby in a backpack peeking over my shoulder as I type away. This was the glamourous life of a writer; a homeschooling mom of five at the time (I went on to have three more children). I found t "I don't have time." Invariably in the writing workshops I teach, someone in the room will lament a lack of time for writing, usually a mom with young children. That is when I pull out a photo I had enlarged and laminated, and pass it around the room. There I am in 1994, sitting in front of a typewriter, a baby in a backpack peeking over my shoulder as I type away. This was the glamourous life of a writer; a homeschooling mom of five at the time (I went on to have three more children). I found the time, made the time, used those "fringe hours" to write because I wanted...no, needed...to write. Writing was the one creative activity I clung to during those years of mothering young children. Now, a widow and single mother with one daughter still at home and a fulltime job, I find myself still struggling to make time for myself. This book explains the importance of doing so, with concrete ideas on how.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jackie Linkous

    This is, without a doubt, one of the most life-changing books I've ever read. I gobbled up every word and answered every question (in a separate notebook). I will read this book again and again - we are worth taking care of. Yes ladies, we need to take the time for self-care. We are worth it! Step 1 for me is to set my craft table back up this weekend and commit to a project. Step 2 is to schedule time regularly to work on that project to fill my cup so I can continue to give to others!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    For a book that promises so many things, it is a little sad that it barely delivers. It's too long — the advice contained within it could have done without accompaniment from two to four women the author somehow interacted with — and preachy. And, what saddened me most of all, the advice within the book is nothing earth-shattering or innovative, and overlaps eerily with a lot of Emilie Barnes's books.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Candace

    The first 1/3 was good, but the second 2/3 was not worth reading, suggesting I do such things as get more sleep and drink more water. I really liked her later book, "Stretched Too Thin", but now I'm going to go back to that one and figure out what was so different that I liked it so well.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Abbi Strader

    I wrote down my average weeks responsibilities and after 15 line items I quit. As a mom, wife, friend, co worker, I need to better understand the value of my fringe hours. Jessica Turner helped me evaluate where I could make changes, what was important and what to stop putting energy into. As Jessica says, “If it isn’t Heck Yes! Then it’s no.”

  27. 5 out of 5

    Relyn

    For a book I heard about everywhere, I found this one to be... MEH. Just - Ho Hum. In my opinion, save your own fringe hours for something more productive and/or pleasurable than this book. Try something by Gretchen Rubin, maybe.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Anderson

    Great, practical book that helps to analyze and discover what you love to do and helps in finding time to do it!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    I have spent a few days trying to figure out how to rate and sum up this book. First of all, I have to say that this is a great concept that I have never considered or heard about before now. I have already started taking advantage of my fringe hours and surprisingly I am not feeling overwhelmed or like I am trying to be unnecessarily busy. I am just doing productive things (reading is productive, right?) with small chunks of time I have in between major tasks instead of wasting time. Second, I g I have spent a few days trying to figure out how to rate and sum up this book. First of all, I have to say that this is a great concept that I have never considered or heard about before now. I have already started taking advantage of my fringe hours and surprisingly I am not feeling overwhelmed or like I am trying to be unnecessarily busy. I am just doing productive things (reading is productive, right?) with small chunks of time I have in between major tasks instead of wasting time. Second, I greatly admire anyone who takes on the task of writing a book on such a specific idea. The author did a great job of creating examples of how we can take advantage of our fringe time and I enjoyed her idea that women need to stop feeling so guilty for not getting everything done. But- and I hate to add a 'but'- her quotation and use of other peoples work was SO EXCESSIVE. I would say about 20% of this book was her words, and the rest were almost all direct quotes from other authors or "best friends" or people that responded to her survey. When considering how to sum up this book, I tried to picture this book as a research article. We have an idea, we add other peoples research and ideas to support our idea, and then we sum it up. But in this book, its her idea... but then she takes off with so many quotations and examples and "my good friend said it this way" 's, that I couldn't even focus on her words and ideas. This book is a summary of other peoples ideas. Which is so harsh to say. But when I had to repeatedly put down this book because I was so overwhelmed with information and not her thoughts and words, that means the use of other peoples work was excessive. (I am also a firm believer that if you have to repeatedly quote other people in your research, you do not know enough about the subject to summarize it by yourself). This book had so much potential. And it is so hard for me to say such harsh things about something the author put so much time and effort into. But this is essentially a summary of other books about using your time effectively. It was a great concept, horrible follow through. [This book was provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review].

  30. 4 out of 5

    writer...

    Inspiriting look at women and self care in the midst of life's responsibilities. Intentional choices that will either deplete or invigorate. Specifically focused on women's choices including comparison to others and guilt. I especially liked the variety of quote sources. Informed by research of 2000+ American women responding to author's survey. Great video conversations lead the online study {available and open after study dates}. *Participating in the Fringe Hours book club read via Bloom at (in Inspiriting look at women and self care in the midst of life's responsibilities. Intentional choices that will either deplete or invigorate. Specifically focused on women's choices including comparison to others and guilt. I especially liked the variety of quote sources. Informed by research of 2000+ American women responding to author's survey. Great video conversations lead the online study {available and open after study dates}. *Participating in the Fringe Hours book club read via Bloom at (in)courage and on FB - Mar 2-30.15 ~ Videos + Study online as listed: Schedule Part 1: Explore Mon 3/2: Video 1 :: Balance: Chapter 1 Thurs 3/5: Video 2 :: Self-Imposed Pressures/Guilt: Chapters 2-3 Part 2: Discover Mon 3/9: Video 3 :: Discover: Chapters 4-5 {Printable #2} Thursday 3/12: Video 4 :: Discover: Chapter 6 Part 3: Maximize Monday 3/16: Video 5 :: Prioritizing & Using Time Wisely: Chapters 7-8 Thursday 3/19: Video 6 :: Help & Obstacles: Chapters 9-10 Part 4: Live Well Monday 3/23: Video 7 :: Community, Rest & Living Well: Chapters 11-13 {Printable #3} Thursday 3/26: A Community Link-Up! Monday 3/30: A Sweet Good-bye

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