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The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook: Wickedly Good Meals and Desserts to Die For

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Hard-boiled breakfasts, thrilling entrees, cozy desserts, and more--this illustrated cookbook features more than 100 recipes from legendary mystery authors. Whether you're planning a sinister dinner party or whipping up some comfort food perfect for a day of writing, you'll find plenty to savor in this cunning collection. Full-color photography is featured throughout, alon Hard-boiled breakfasts, thrilling entrees, cozy desserts, and more--this illustrated cookbook features more than 100 recipes from legendary mystery authors. Whether you're planning a sinister dinner party or whipping up some comfort food perfect for a day of writing, you'll find plenty to savor in this cunning collection. Full-color photography is featured throughout, along with mischievous sidebars revealing the links between food and foul play. Contributors include Lee Child, Mary Higgins Clark, Harlan Coben, Nelson DeMille, Gillian Flynn, Sue Grafton, Charlaine Harris, James Patterson, Louise Penny, Scott Turow, and many more.


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Hard-boiled breakfasts, thrilling entrees, cozy desserts, and more--this illustrated cookbook features more than 100 recipes from legendary mystery authors. Whether you're planning a sinister dinner party or whipping up some comfort food perfect for a day of writing, you'll find plenty to savor in this cunning collection. Full-color photography is featured throughout, alon Hard-boiled breakfasts, thrilling entrees, cozy desserts, and more--this illustrated cookbook features more than 100 recipes from legendary mystery authors. Whether you're planning a sinister dinner party or whipping up some comfort food perfect for a day of writing, you'll find plenty to savor in this cunning collection. Full-color photography is featured throughout, along with mischievous sidebars revealing the links between food and foul play. Contributors include Lee Child, Mary Higgins Clark, Harlan Coben, Nelson DeMille, Gillian Flynn, Sue Grafton, Charlaine Harris, James Patterson, Louise Penny, Scott Turow, and many more.

30 review for The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook: Wickedly Good Meals and Desserts to Die For

  1. 4 out of 5

    Yodamom

    I received this yesterday after winning it on a giveaway, thank you Quirk Books. My first thoughts were WOW, the cover is amazing, then I opened it and was tingling with excitement. I do this really, I love cookbooks. The pictures were beautiful, the recipes all unique and what a variety, this will keep my family busy. Vegetarian, cheesy, meaty, light and desserts all from authors known and loved int his house. This book is going on my list of gifts to get for my mystery loving foodie friends. Thi I received this yesterday after winning it on a giveaway, thank you Quirk Books. My first thoughts were WOW, the cover is amazing, then I opened it and was tingling with excitement. I do this really, I love cookbooks. The pictures were beautiful, the recipes all unique and what a variety, this will keep my family busy. Vegetarian, cheesy, meaty, light and desserts all from authors known and loved int his house. This book is going on my list of gifts to get for my mystery loving foodie friends. This weekend I'll be making a dip from Ms. Charlaine Harris. :D

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    Kate White, the Vogue editor who also pens the superb Bailey Weggins novels has assemble some delicious recipes from some killer mystery novelists, including Gillian Flynn, Sue Grafton, Mary Higgins Clark, Scott Turow, Louise Penny, Lisa Scottaline, Charlaine Harris, Lee Child, Carolyn Hart, Max Allen Collins, Diane Mott Davidson, Harlen Coben, Brad Meltzer, Rhys Bowen and many, many more. If you’ve read them, they can probably feed your stomach as well as your mind, thanks to this cookbook. Do n Kate White, the Vogue editor who also pens the superb Bailey Weggins novels has assemble some delicious recipes from some killer mystery novelists, including Gillian Flynn, Sue Grafton, Mary Higgins Clark, Scott Turow, Louise Penny, Lisa Scottaline, Charlaine Harris, Lee Child, Carolyn Hart, Max Allen Collins, Diane Mott Davidson, Harlen Coben, Brad Meltzer, Rhys Bowen and many, many more. If you’ve read them, they can probably feed your stomach as well as your mind, thanks to this cookbook. Do not miss Brad Meltzer’s Italian Chicken. Finding that recipe online led me to this cookbook in the first place! Linda Stasi provides the recipe to the Original New York Cheesecake, created at Ratner’s Kosher restaurant in 1905. Alafair Burke provides Ellie Hatcher’s Rum-Soaked Nutella French Toast. (Although Burke’s character NYPD Detective isn’t much of a cook, this simple recipe is mighty fine.) Allison Leotta’s recipe, The World’s Best Red Sauce (a.k.a. Leotta Sauce) — that’s actually the recipe’s name — starts with canned tomatoes and is simmered only 10 minutes and is still pretty good (although I wouldn’t go as far as Leotta herself does. And John Lutz’s Gooey Butter Cake recipe from St. Louis might give you diabetes (it takes a full pound of confectioner’s sugar), but it’s exquisite. It would be a crime not to read this cookbook.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Martin

    These recipes run the gamut from three ingredients found in every kitchen to a dozen that I swear I'd have to buy over the internet. I liked the introductions of each recipe by the author who linked the recipe to one of their books or to a family memory. While I'm going to pass on Sue Grafton's Peanut Butter & Pickle Sandwich, I think I might give Louise Penny's recipe for Tourtiere a try some day. I liked the nice assortment of recipes from appetizers to desserts and drinks. Mamma's Pimento Che These recipes run the gamut from three ingredients found in every kitchen to a dozen that I swear I'd have to buy over the internet. I liked the introductions of each recipe by the author who linked the recipe to one of their books or to a family memory. While I'm going to pass on Sue Grafton's Peanut Butter & Pickle Sandwich, I think I might give Louise Penny's recipe for Tourtiere a try some day. I liked the nice assortment of recipes from appetizers to desserts and drinks. Mamma's Pimento Cheese as given by Susan M. Boyer sounds great even though I haven't heard of some of the cheeses she calls for. I'm also a little intimidated by the idea that it makes 3 quarts. I don't think I know enough people to share that amount with. I can't wait to try David Housewritght's Corn Chowder recipe. I liked the variety of authors whose recipes were included. I've read many of them including Charlaine Harris, Carolyn Hart, Diane Mott Davidson, Laurie R. King and Catherine Coulter. I was also encouraged to try books and series by other authors because I liked the recipes they included and want to meet their characters. People looking for a cookbook to go with what they're reading would be the perfect audience for this collection.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Richard Cardenas

    There should have been more pictures but I still enjoyed it and will be following some of the recipes very soon. Everything looked and sounded so good. I also loved the little touches of decorations and the tiny inserts of snippets from the authors mystery novels. :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jillyn

    4.5/5 stars. Before I can even start my review of the actual book itself, I'd like to mention how beautiful this hardcover is. It's a textured cover with a cute pattern of skulls, knives, and forks on the side and a golden ribbon placeholder. It looks very old school murder mystery novel, which is a perfect homage considering what book this is! The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook is a collection of recipes from dozens of just that- mystery authors. I'm familiar with more than a few of these au 4.5/5 stars. Before I can even start my review of the actual book itself, I'd like to mention how beautiful this hardcover is. It's a textured cover with a cute pattern of skulls, knives, and forks on the side and a golden ribbon placeholder. It looks very old school murder mystery novel, which is a perfect homage considering what book this is! The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook is a collection of recipes from dozens of just that- mystery authors. I'm familiar with more than a few of these authors (Charlaine Harris, Joelle Charbonneau, and Gillian Flynn to name a sample), and the ones I haven't heard of have still made an impact on the mystery genre. There's even a special bonus recipe from the one and only Richard Castle of the show "Castle" which I thought was a great touch. The recipes are divided by course for easy navigation, and each course chapter has its own index so it's easy to find your favorite author or your favorite recipe, whichever it may be that you're looking for. There's also really cool facts and tips sprinkled throughout the book. But what's really awesome about these recipes is that they each have a back story. So many of them are pulled from the author's book- a character who made this dinner for another character or a character who owned a bakery, things like that. I love seeing fiction brought to real life like this, especially since more than once I have looked up recipes after reading a book (like The Hunger Games and Beautiful Disaster for example). If the recipe isn't from a book, there's still a nice personal story about why the author included it. It feels like I'm in a book club or something, like I'm really casually friends with these amazing writers who are giving me new dishes to try. It's a cool, cozy vibe to the whole book. I also really like that at the end of the book, there's charts for weight/measurement conversions. That's a really overlooked thing in cookbooks, in my opinion. I wish there had been more pictures, but that being said there's a fair amount of photographs in here to help you along the way. Some of the dishes that I'm most looking forward to making are Male Chauvinist Pigs in the Blanket (Nelson DeMille), Grandma Maria's Pasta Puttanesca (Lorenzo Carcaterra), and Latvian Solstice Squares (William Burton McCormick). There's also a cocktails section, for the perfect night in. Plus, proceeds go to the MWA, which is pretty cool too. I think this book is fantastic, and any book lover (especially a mystery book lover) would love to have this recipe collection. I also think it'd make a perfect gift, due to both the delicious content and the gorgeous presentation. Thanks so much to Quirk Books who provided me with a copy in exchange for my honest review. This review can also be found on my blog, Bitches n Prose.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook - 5 Stars Edited by Kate White Wickedly Good Recipes -From Many Favorite Writers Quirk Books, 2015, 176 Pages ISBN-13: 978-1594747571 Reviewed by Patricia E. Reid This cookbook contains more than 100 recipes, from breakfast to cocktails, great photography and commentary from legendary authors and fun mystery facts. This book will make a wonderful gift for some lucky friend if you can bring yourself to let go. You might as well just order two because once you see The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook - 5 Stars Edited by Kate White Wickedly Good Recipes -From Many Favorite Writers Quirk Books, 2015, 176 Pages ISBN-13: 978-1594747571 Reviewed by Patricia E. Reid This cookbook contains more than 100 recipes, from breakfast to cocktails, great photography and commentary from legendary authors and fun mystery facts. This book will make a wonderful gift for some lucky friend if you can bring yourself to let go. You might as well just order two because once you see this recipe book you won't want to let go of it. The introduction includes a reminder of the murder weapon used in Roald Dahl's 1953 short story "Lamb to the Slaughter". The proceeds of the sale of this cookbook go to MWA, an organization founded in 1945 and dedicated to promoting higher regard for crime writing and recognition and respect for those who write within the genre MWA sponsors the annual Edgar Awards named for Edgar Allan Poe and considered the Academy Awards of mystery writers. Breakfast includes recipes ranging from Ellie Hatcher's Rum-Soaked Nutella French Toast to Max Allan Collins and Barbara Collins Holiday Eggs. Richard Castle gives us his recipe for Morning-After Hotcakes. For the Appetizer section Nelson DeMille has contributed Male Chauvinist Pigs in the Blanket. This is followed up by Kate White's A Very Sneaky Bean Dip. There are a number of excellent sounding appetizers to choose from. The Soup and Salad section contains several recipes that I would like to try right now. Kate White gives the reader a very good definition of "What Exactly Is A Red Herring?" This refers to a Red Herring in a mystery and not in a recipe. There is a large section of entrees headed up by David Morrrell's Thomas De Quincey's Pasta -Less Pasta. I won't tell you what takes the place of the pasta so you will need to get the book. I am sure everyone will want Sue Grafton's Kinsey Millhone's Famous Peanut Butter and Pickle Sandwich. The book contains a chapter on Side Dishes, Desserts and Cocktails. The book contains Metric Conversions which is a very helpful addition. I haven't named many of the authors in this review but there are so many I know every reader will find at least one favorite author. Lee Child presents very exact instructions for making Coffee, Pot of One. The recipe even includes the type of coffee and mug to use. You can't go wrong with this cookbook. There is a little bit of everything included and some insight into the likes of many of your favorite authors.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Let's think about this one for just a second. How on earth would I be able to pass on this one. The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook contains two of my favorite things in the world, mysteries and food. It's a no-brainer, and I would have deserved to be victim number one, had I not jumped at the chance to get my hands on this one. When I got it in the mail, and I'm not exaggerating this, I skipped all the way from the mailbox to my front door. I was that damn excited. Now it took me a few days Let's think about this one for just a second. How on earth would I be able to pass on this one. The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook contains two of my favorite things in the world, mysteries and food. It's a no-brainer, and I would have deserved to be victim number one, had I not jumped at the chance to get my hands on this one. When I got it in the mail, and I'm not exaggerating this, I skipped all the way from the mailbox to my front door. I was that damn excited. Now it took me a few days to have the time to start trying out some of the recipes, but once I did, I have to admit to being a little impressed. These aren't examples of complicated, high cuisine. For the most part, the recipes are fairly simple, easy to follow, and it's the kind of food we all love to eat. I'm not a huge breakfast eater, but I know it's the most important meal of the day, so I try to get by the best that I can. I'm really not an egg fan, so the fact I was willing to make an omelet should shock everyone I know, but when I saw who contributed it to the book, I had to go for it. I think you guys know that I'm a huge fan of Ben H. Winters The Last Policeman trilogy, and thank the lord, he included Detective Palace's Three-Egg Omelet. If you are a fan of the series, you will recognize Hank's customary breakfast. It was super easy to make, and while I'm still not a huge fan of eggs, I'm willing to love anything attached to Hank Palace. After I had perused the entire book, I decided to try out Brad Meltzer's Italian Chicken. Again it was a dish with only 7 ingredients, two of them salt and pepper, and it was so easy to make. There were only 5 steps to it, the first was to preheat an oven and spray a baking dish. I wasn't expecting it to be as good as it was. I think sometimes we forget that simple is good, and that sometimes it's the best way to go. And not to name drop, but here are some of the other authors who have contributed recipes of their own: Louise Penny, Mary Higgins Clark, Rhys Bowen, Kathy Reichs, Charles Todd, Jacqueline Winspear, Gillian Flynn, Sue Grafton (the peanut butter and pickle sandwich her main character loves so much), James Patterson, and tons more. This will be one of those cookbooks I go back to over, and over, and over again.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jade

    I have not cooked any of the recipes...YET. However I have read through the book and read MANY of the recipes and look forward to trying them. What I really love about this cookbook is the little stories and such that goes along with the recipes! Great book for those who love to read and love to cook! I received a complimentary copy of this cookbook via First Reads. These are my honest opinions of this book. Thank you.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    This was fun. I liked the notes from the authors much more than the recipes...many of those were pretty ordinary. But the authors' comments about their characters were enjoyable and dishy (pardon the awful pun.) I liked that I learned about authors and series I haven't read yet.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Ks Book Reviews

    I’ve wanted this book from the first moment I saw it. I was blessed enough to have a friend give it to me one year on Buy A Friend A Book Day. I love it just as much as I knew I would! It totally supports my theory that food and mysteries simply go together. THE MYSTERY WRITERS OF AMERICA COOKBOOK features recipe from authors on all sides of the mystery spectrum. If you have a favorite mystery author, chances are they have a recipe in this book. After a short but fun introduction, this cookbook I’ve wanted this book from the first moment I saw it. I was blessed enough to have a friend give it to me one year on Buy A Friend A Book Day. I love it just as much as I knew I would! It totally supports my theory that food and mysteries simply go together. THE MYSTERY WRITERS OF AMERICA COOKBOOK features recipe from authors on all sides of the mystery spectrum. If you have a favorite mystery author, chances are they have a recipe in this book. After a short but fun introduction, this cookbook gets right down to business and starts the offered recipes off with the Breakfast chapter. The chapters that follow are Appetizers, Soups and Salads, Entrées, Side Dishes, Desserts, and finally, Cocktails. Recipes you’ll find are . . . Sugarloaf Café Sweet Rolls, Whole Wheat Wild Blueberry Lemon Pecan Muffins, Mystery Crackers, Cheesy Garlic Artichoke Dip, Murderously Good Maine Chowdah, Mistaken Potato Salad, Zillion Calorie Mac and Cheese, Slow-Cooker Meatballs, Comfort Chicken and Sweet Potatoes, Lobster-Pesto Risotto, Simplest Ever Potato Pancakes, A Tomato Sauce for All Seasons, Mrs. Hudson’s Coffee Sheet Cookies, Cozy Southern Chocolate Chip Pudding Cake, The “Smoking Gun” Margarita, The Switchblade Cocktail, Killer Sweet Tea, and a whole lot more! THE MYSTERY WRITERS OF AMERICA COOKBOOK, ha something for everyone’s tastes. It would be so much fun to host a Murder Mystery Dinner and use recipes from this book for the meal. Your guests would be so impressed! My only negative about this book is the shortage of photos. The ones featured are wonderful, but I think photos of all the recipes really should be represented. But don’t let that stop you from getting this unique cookbook. It would be a crime not to add this to your collection!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lesa

    Once again, Mystery Writers of America brings together some of the top mystery writers in the field in a collection that benefits MWA. This time, though, the book is not a compilation of short stories. Instead, under the guidance of editor Kate White, the authors have contributed recipes to The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook. The book is as entertaining as you would suspect when all those authors contribute ideas. On the cover it says, "Wickedly Good Recipes". Not having tried the recipes, I Once again, Mystery Writers of America brings together some of the top mystery writers in the field in a collection that benefits MWA. This time, though, the book is not a compilation of short stories. Instead, under the guidance of editor Kate White, the authors have contributed recipes to The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook. The book is as entertaining as you would suspect when all those authors contribute ideas. On the cover it says, "Wickedly Good Recipes". Not having tried the recipes, I can't agree on that, but I can say it's wicked fun. There's everything from Sue Grafton's contribution, "Kinsey Millhone's Famous Peanut Butter & Pickle Sandwich" to just what you would expect from Lee Child, how to make coffee for one. The book is broken down into logical chapters for a cookbook, beginning with breakfast and ending with cocktails. But, it's only in a compilation by mystery authors that the editor includes historical essays about poisons. White's short entries also include posts about Agatha Christie, Sherlock Holmes, Nero Wolfe and Edgar Allan Poe. Mystery fans will not only appreciate the recipes, but also the blurbs that tell about the author, their books, and their websites. Mary Higgins Clark, Louise Penny, James Patterson, Hank Phillippi Ryan, Alafair Burke, Rhys Bowen, and Harlan Coben are just some of the authors that contributed the recipes that number over one hundred. There are recipes for every level of cooking expertise, from Charlaine Harris' "Very Unsophisticated Supper Dip" to Jacqueline Winspear's Syllabub. Are you interested in the book because you like to cook? Or, are you a mystery fan entertained by the recipes and the author's story behind the recipe? No matter why you're interested, this beautifully illustrated selection, The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook, will find a welcome home on your shelf. The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook. Edited by Kate White. Quirk Books. 2015. ISBN 9781594747571 (hardcover), 175p.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Excellent mix of authors and recipes -- this is sure to appeal to mystery and food fans alike. Several of my favorite authors (including Charles Todd (who graduated from the Culinary Institute of America!), Louise Penny, Allison Leotta, and Laura Lippman) contributed to the collection and several recipes from the "new to me" authors made me want to check out their books. Each recipe comes with a short blurb about the recipe and the associated works by the authors. Equally enjoyable is the conver Excellent mix of authors and recipes -- this is sure to appeal to mystery and food fans alike. Several of my favorite authors (including Charles Todd (who graduated from the Culinary Institute of America!), Louise Penny, Allison Leotta, and Laura Lippman) contributed to the collection and several recipes from the "new to me" authors made me want to check out their books. Each recipe comes with a short blurb about the recipe and the associated works by the authors. Equally enjoyable is the conversational style in which some of the recipes are written -- it's almost like the author is right there in the kitchen with you! The recipes range in skill level, making this a fun collection regardless of your own culinary prowess. While I've enjoyed all of the recipes I've tried so far, my three favorites are Lisa Scottoline's A Tomato Sauce for All Seasons (which is actually two versions in one recipe -- the summer version was perfect for a beastly hot summer day!), Gigi Pandian's Caramelized Onion Dal (normally I don't like onions but this recipe was so tasty, I ate every bite!), and Ben H. Winters' Detective Palace's Three-Egg Omelet (the instructions are a hoot and so clear that I finally succeeded in producing an omelet that looked like ones I've only aspired to in the past).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brenna

    This is a fun read that happens to be a cookbook. A collection of mystery writers have contributed recipes from something simple to more complex, and each recipe has a blurb relating its relevance to one of the author's books. Even the recipes names have a creative twist to them. Included also are a few tidbits on Poe's take on a good meal and P.D. James' take on herbal toxicology as it pertains to plots of mystery novels. There are 171 pages of recipes plus metric conversions for volume and wei This is a fun read that happens to be a cookbook. A collection of mystery writers have contributed recipes from something simple to more complex, and each recipe has a blurb relating its relevance to one of the author's books. Even the recipes names have a creative twist to them. Included also are a few tidbits on Poe's take on a good meal and P.D. James' take on herbal toxicology as it pertains to plots of mystery novels. There are 171 pages of recipes plus metric conversions for volume and weights, and an index. 7 chapters covering breakfast, entrees, soups, appetizers, salads and sides, desserts, and cocktails. This cookbook would allow booklovers or even a small book club have a lot of fun cooking together. ****This book was won in a Booklikes giveaway given by publisher, Quirk Books.****

  14. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    Every one in a while I like to pop a cookbook into my list of books. This one was ok, not great - I originally got it from the library (and thank goodness I didn't pay for it) because it had a bunch of mystery writers I like. So a couple of problems. In my opinion, a great cookbook should make an effort to show, even if it is tiny all the recipes and this one only shows about one per chapter, perhaps a couple of chapters there would be a second or third one. The second problem and this is where Every one in a while I like to pop a cookbook into my list of books. This one was ok, not great - I originally got it from the library (and thank goodness I didn't pay for it) because it had a bunch of mystery writers I like. So a couple of problems. In my opinion, a great cookbook should make an effort to show, even if it is tiny all the recipes and this one only shows about one per chapter, perhaps a couple of chapters there would be a second or third one. The second problem and this is where I blame editing, no photography, etc. is one of the cake recipes, when I looked at the ingredients, I thought it was odd that it was a cake that didn't list flour and guess what, in the directions, it calls for flour - how much and what kind - your guess is as good as mine.......these 2 reasons made it lose 2 stars........

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tricia Douglas

    I love this book! Not only are my favorite authors in this book, but some that I must have missed and I will now have to read. Some recipes are just really fun when you see who submitted them. For instance, Sue Grafton chose to add Kinsey Millhone's famous Peanut Butter and Pickle sandwich. If you're familiar with Kinsey's cooking then you'll smile too. Lee Child submitted his recipe for Coffee, Pot of One. Almost every mystery writer that's important is in this cookbook. This was definitely a w I love this book! Not only are my favorite authors in this book, but some that I must have missed and I will now have to read. Some recipes are just really fun when you see who submitted them. For instance, Sue Grafton chose to add Kinsey Millhone's famous Peanut Butter and Pickle sandwich. If you're familiar with Kinsey's cooking then you'll smile too. Lee Child submitted his recipe for Coffee, Pot of One. Almost every mystery writer that's important is in this cookbook. This was definitely a wise purchase for my book shelf. Be sure to take a look at it online if you can.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia

    Enjoyed reading about new authors as well as though I was familiar with and their recipes.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    I enjoy "reading" cookbooks, not just for the recipes, but the stories that are told as part of that recipe. This cookbook was a compilation of various recipes from enumerable contemporary mystery writers. Some recipes were straight from the pages of their novels, composed of dishes their detectives either cooked and/or ate. Others were recipes the authors themselves whipped up, often between lengthy writing sessions when they stopped long enough to realize they had forgotten to eat their lunch. I enjoy "reading" cookbooks, not just for the recipes, but the stories that are told as part of that recipe. This cookbook was a compilation of various recipes from enumerable contemporary mystery writers. Some recipes were straight from the pages of their novels, composed of dishes their detectives either cooked and/or ate. Others were recipes the authors themselves whipped up, often between lengthy writing sessions when they stopped long enough to realize they had forgotten to eat their lunch. I'm not sure how many of these recipes I'll actually make, but it was interesting to read more about these authors, and perhaps discover some new series to check out it future.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    THE MYSTERY WRITERS OF AMERICA COOKBOOK REVIEW from http://wordstormcasserole.com/2015/04... The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook appeared in my mailbox the other day, and I had no idea why it had been sent to me. Fortunately, the mystery was solved with the included letter: I’d won it on a LibraryThing.com giveaway. But were the recipes any good? I began my investigation. Word to the wise: there are affiliate links in this article. If you click a link and buy a book, I’ll get a tiny sum of mone THE MYSTERY WRITERS OF AMERICA COOKBOOK REVIEW from http://wordstormcasserole.com/2015/04... The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook appeared in my mailbox the other day, and I had no idea why it had been sent to me. Fortunately, the mystery was solved with the included letter: I’d won it on a LibraryThing.com giveaway. But were the recipes any good? I began my investigation. Word to the wise: there are affiliate links in this article. If you click a link and buy a book, I’ll get a tiny sum of money. Thank you. Additionally, because I won this book, I’m under no obligation to give it a good review. Heavens knows not all cookbooks are created equal. First I looked at the 175-page hardcover book. It’s published by Quirk Books who claims the cookbook features “hard-boiled breakfasts, thrilling entrees, and cozy desserts…” While I know Lee Child, Mary Higgins Clark, Harlan Coben, Sue Grafton, Scott Turow, James Patterson, and others can write like nobody’s business, can they cook? Or write a recipe to satisfy my curiosity? I perused and selected a handful of recipes to explore. Grand-Mere Marie’s Root Vegetable Vichyssoise by Wendy Hornsby takes some patience what with cleaning the leeks and chopping celery, carrots, and other root veggies like turnips, parsnips, winter squash, and rutabagas. But with a base of thick-cut bacon, a splash of white wine, and a dash of butter, this soup is a winner. Perfect for a late spring when there are brave crocus blooming amidst a spattering of light wanna-be snow. No, more than that. It’s to die for. I couldn’t help myself. It really IS that good. Likewise the Latvian Solstice Squares while perhaps not totally authentic to Latvia culture, deserve a place in your dessert back pocket. With preparation similar to Eagle Brand’s illustrious Magic Cookie Bars. This version uses a mixture of German chocolate cake mix and butter as a base, then throws in semisweet chocolate chips, peanut butter chips, butterscotch chips, and almond brickle chips. Heck, my German chocolate cake mix included a pouch of dry ingredients to create that luscious coconut frosting – I threw that in with the base mixture and was delighted with the results. Oooeee gooey goodness. The Mystery Crackers by Sandra Brown are as easy as can be, and certainly tasty. Definitely something you’d want to make if you hate to cook and have some time to spare. Or, as Brown writes in the introduction, “I can make Mystery Crackers while I’m writing. And I keep them in the fridge of my office for snacking. If I’m in a lull, I can nibble a few to ‘spice things up!” While I didn’t go for the suggested cayenne pepper, I did try them with a smoked paprika – yum! I was also intrigued by the Farfalle with Fennel and Pine Nuts on page 62; this recipe is by author Leslie Budewitz. Unfortunately, my local super-duper mart did not have fennel. I improvised with shredded brussels sprouts and walnuts for me. And with the guidelines in the recipe it still turned out really good. Who knew brussels sprouts worked so well with raisins and cinnamon? My adapted recipe is below. And finally, I implore you to make Sue Grafton’s recipe for Kinsey Millhone’s Famous Peanut Butter & Pickle Sandwich on page 87. While Grafton urges readers to avoid improvisations, sometimes a tight situation requires quick thinking. I did what I had to do: Creamy PB, the toasted lower half of an “Everything” bagel, and a five perfect bread & butter pickle chips completed my snack. And I’d do it again. Case closed. Proceed to the nearest bookstore or click on a link to buy, cook, and eat.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Melissa I

    by Kate White and a ton of amazing mystery and thriller authors! OH.....MY....GOD!! I expected awesome, but I didn't expect this awesome! I absolutely Love this book!! I'll have more to come, but for now I had to come here to give this book the highest praise for probably the most awesome cookbook 'ever'! Ok, some of the recipes are questionable......probably just one and that one is the Peanut butter and Pickle sandwich, lol. The first and most imaginative winner is "Male Chauvinist Pigs I by Kate White and a ton of amazing mystery and thriller authors! OH.....MY....GOD!! I expected awesome, but I didn't expect this awesome! I absolutely Love this book!! I'll have more to come, but for now I had to come here to give this book the highest praise for probably the most awesome cookbook 'ever'! Ok, some of the recipes are questionable......probably just one and that one is the Peanut butter and Pickle sandwich, lol. The first and most imaginative winner is "Male Chauvinist Pigs In A Blanket". It's not just the name, but the way the author presents and details the recipe process! I'm not saying anything more on that so I don't ruin it for other readers, but my ex laughed and that's.....impossible. Even more impossible is him letting me sit next to him and go through all the awesome things about this book *any book*. That was just a miracle and he enjoyed it. It was so nice to FINALLY have somebody in person to share a book with and this one is hands down a winner. I have cookbooks from 'so' many people and schools, including the Culinary Institute of America, but this one is in a class of it's own. The authors who contributed are amazing and so many more in the book than I realized before I got it. It's not just recipes. It's fun facts, stories (One that includes a letter from Poe to his mother-in-law, and a Sherlock Holmes box of cool facts. Under each recipe at the bottom of the page is a bit about the author and their books and at the top right under each recipe is about the recipe and the meaning behind it RE: The characters from the books!!! OMG, LOL! I Love this SO much and the outside of it is as beautiful as the inside. Blown away.....one thing extra I loved was that the editors name was one whom I just finished reading her book by Kate White . I wish I could tag every single contributing author, but I think it would be more fun for readers to open it up and discover the absolute Beauty of this book. Inside and out and front to back. I even love the attached yellow ribbon that's a bookmark. Seriously, this book was created with pure love. It's a keeper and a family heirloom in the making. So much more to say and it's one I highly, highly recommend. I'm sure I'll be back to add more. I want to thank Quirk Books for sending me a copy of this book after I had won it from the James Patterson newsletter. It seems my copy got lost in the mail and #QuirkBooks got back to me immediately to replace the copy that went MIA. A million thanks to Quirk, Quirk Books Marketing Employee Hannah Frank, The JamesPatterson.com website newsletter for this incredible gift. Side note to Quirk: I'll be sending a separate message of thanks. I just wanted to get this posted because I'm bouncing off the walls excited, but with a death in the family Wednesday and another in the ER today my brain is tired. Thank you so much. A Fantastic book is an understatement! I can't wait to take pictures to share....thank you to the stars and back. This is a treasure!! <3 BUY IT NOW ;-) Please :-) You won't regret it!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

    This is a review for Quirk Books as part of their blogger team. Thank you guys. First I was going to add a video along with this of me semi-preparing one of the recipes, and a review of it..but I recorded it on my tablet, and well I'm not to good with videos. The file was too big for all the editing software I tried. (I admit I didn't try very hard with editing the video,but it's not the most important thing. I can still put in my word about it. :) ) I did only cook one thing from the book right This is a review for Quirk Books as part of their blogger team. Thank you guys. First I was going to add a video along with this of me semi-preparing one of the recipes, and a review of it..but I recorded it on my tablet, and well I'm not to good with videos. The file was too big for all the editing software I tried. (I admit I didn't try very hard with editing the video,but it's not the most important thing. I can still put in my word about it. :) ) I did only cook one thing from the book right now, I'll make more later. OK, I made Karen Haper's Zucchini Bread. I chose this because it was cheap,easy,and well I like zucchini. I did really enjoy it. As I was making it I kept thinking I was doing something wrong, and prayed it would turn out correctly. When I pulled it out of the oven I was glad it came out. The only issue I had was it stuck to the bottom of the pan a little. I did grease it like I was supposed to, but like I said I'm just not the baker type really. I also made quite a mess making it. Book is already soiled...oops. well it's a cookbook that's going to happen. I flipped through the book, and was really impressed. I was trying not to drool over some of the pictures of the stuff I would eat. Some stuff I know I wont make, just either I won't eat it, or well I also don't have anyone to cook for in general. This book is really well laid out into categories,and many well known authors have put in their favorite recipes. Pick this up if you're hungry. preferably for food. Feed your hungry for murder and mystery with food inspired by your favorite authors,and feed your hungry for murder and mystery with a book from your favorite mystery author.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    This cookbook is a very good community cookbook. Like most community cookbooks...I suspect that there was no recipe testing done (be careful of the lemon poppyseed recipe - it doesn't include the flour measurement) prior to printing. But...you've probably bought it because the organization that produced it is near and dear to your heart and because there is that one recipe that "insert name here" brings to every potluck that always draws you back for seconds. If you enjoy reading mysteries (and c This cookbook is a very good community cookbook. Like most community cookbooks...I suspect that there was no recipe testing done (be careful of the lemon poppyseed recipe - it doesn't include the flour measurement) prior to printing. But...you've probably bought it because the organization that produced it is near and dear to your heart and because there is that one recipe that "insert name here" brings to every potluck that always draws you back for seconds. If you enjoy reading mysteries (and cooking!), then you'll enjoy this book. I think it is the most delightful cookbook that I've ever read. Each author's intro to their recipe is charming. The layout is ideal...most recipes are limited to one page. The recipes that require 2 pages are facing pages. I'd appreciate a larger font size, but then I'm sure that would mean more recipes would be multiple pages. I'd also appreciate more photos of the finished recipes. There is a large selection of recipes (including beverages! and slow cooker options!) I made Edith Maxwell's Local Leek Tart and Karin Slaughter's Cathy's Coke Roast. Both recipes included easy to find ingredients, and the directions were easy to follow. A caveat...the directions are suitable for experienced/confident cooks...cooking times are not always paired with visual prompts. I enjoyed the tart more than the roast. The roast needed more flavor from spices, and the vegetables were pretty grey by the end of the cooking time. I used a tri tip roast which definitely needed gravy. I sampled the Gooey Butter Cake, Grandma's Killer Chocolate Cake, and Farfalle with Fennel and Pine Nuts at the Maze Library cookbook discussion and enjoyed all of them.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Leslynn

    Hmm, sadly the book design and hype promise more than the recipes deliver -- this just from reading, not making or tasting. Also, there was no concession made for international cooks/bakers and the recipes are all in ounces. But, I'll definitely try some of the items in the book, and perhaps my review will change? Hmm, sadly the book design and hype promise more than the recipes deliver -- this just from reading, not making or tasting. Also, there was no concession made for international cooks/bakers and the recipes are all in ounces. But, I'll definitely try some of the items in the book, and perhaps my review will change?

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Just received this book, flipped through it briefly when it arrived and am very excited to really dive into it. The recipes look amazing and the book seems very high quality. Now that I have had time to really sit down and look at this book, I am very impressed with it. I did not expect the recipes in it to be as great as they are, there are many things in it I cannot wait to try. I will be recommending this to friends that are also fans of the authors included in the book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    What a gem! This gorgeous cookbook is filled with recipes from my favorite mystery authors plus beautiful photography of the dishes. I have tried John Lutz's "Gooey Butter Cake" and Scott Turow's "Innocent Frittata." Both were delicious! A must-read for mystery lovers and foodies alike!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Beverly

    I borrowed this book from the library as I have learned from experience to borrow and read a recipe book before buying a copy! I found several recipes I would like to try so I plan to buy the book. It was also fun to read each mystery writers introduction to his or her special recipe.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Reading For Sanity

    For this review and more, please visit us at: http://readingforsanity.blogspot.com/... For this review and more, please visit us at: http://readingforsanity.blogspot.com/...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mallory

    Find this review and more fantastical things at The Leaning Tower of Tomes. Source: I received this book from the publisher in exchange for review consideration. This in no way affects my review; all opinions are my own. Thank you, Eric and Quirk Books! The review: It turns out that mystery writers are also excellent cooks. Which isn’t all that surprising, seeing as a lot of fictional murders are caused by using poison hidden in delectable, delicious foods. In fact, Agath Find this review and more fantastical things at The Leaning Tower of Tomes. Source: I received this book from the publisher in exchange for review consideration. This in no way affects my review; all opinions are my own. Thank you, Eric and Quirk Books! The review: It turns out that mystery writers are also excellent cooks. Which isn’t all that surprising, seeing as a lot of fictional murders are caused by using poison hidden in delectable, delicious foods. In fact, Agatha Christie poisoned characters in more than half of all her sixty-six books. She acquired a lot of knowledge on “drugs as therapeutic agents as well as poison” (page 25) due to her work as a hospital pharmacy dispenser during World War I and World War II. So. Don’t ever tick off a mystery writer, else you should be very worried about what you or somebody else puts on your plate. You might end up dead in their new story. The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook includes recipes from 100+ writers, covering everything you might dream up to eat throughout the day. The recipes range from ones that are featured in actual novels to ones that are meaningful somehow to the authors themselves. Each recipe is accompanied by a brief essay about its backstory. Some are meatier than others (har-har), some are funny, some are personal, some are just a sentence or two. Not so shockingly, my favorite chapter was DESSERTS. And the recipes that really stood out to me here (and made my mouth water uncontrollably) were: Joseph Finder’s “Doreen’s Apple Crumble” (sounds divine), Gayle Lynds’ “The Hungry Spy’s Deep-Fried Chocolate Bananas” (GIMME THIS NOW), Diane Mott Davidson’s “Fa-La-La Fruitcake Cookies” (I love cookies of all kind and these sound different and delectable), John Lutz’s “Gooey Butter Cake” (BUTTER AND CAKE, PEOPLE), Linda Stasi’s “Original New York City Cheesecake” (CHEESE AND CAKE, PEOPLE), James Patterson’s “Grandma’s Killer Chocolate Cake” (CHOCOLATE AND CAKE, PEOPLE), Mary Jane Clark’s “Sinfully Delicious Siesta Key Lime Pie” (KEY LIMES AND PIE, PEOPLE), and Lois Lavrisa’s “Cozy Southern Chocolate Chip Pudding Cake” (CHOCOLATE CHIPS AND PUDDING AND CAKE, PEOPLE. THIS ONE WINS). All of those dishes sound amazing and I desperately want to try making them for special occasions. Or, you know, just because I want to. ;D I did notice that a lot of the recipes feature meat. I am a pescetarian except on Thanksgiving when I eat turkey. So while I was looking at the ingredients lists I noticed that this cookbook isn’t optimal for vegetarians. Some of the vegetarian and pescetarian entree recipes that did catch my attention were: Leslie Budewitz’s “Farfalle with Fennel and Pine Nuts”, Raymond Benson’s “Zillion Calorie Mac and Cheese” (because mac'n cheese is just so homey and comforting), Joelle Charbonneau’s “Testing Pizza” (because who doesn't love pizza?!), Ken Ludwig’s “Lenore Schneiderman’s Gourmet Quiche” (I love quiche. I also just love the word quiche. Quiche, quiche, quiche, quiche), Carolyn Hart’s “Simple Salmon”, Kim Fay’s “Caramelized Clay Pot Fish”, Kathy Reichs’ “Shrimp Scampi” (I would eat shrimp scampi all day every day if I was a hermit), and Linda Fairstein’s “Angel Hair Pasta with Scallops and Shallots”. I’d love to have these dishes for dinner! Let’s go through the other courses. Breakfast is my favorite meal of the day, and quite possibly the most important one. Some recipes that made my stomach grumble were: Alafair Burke’s “Ellie Hatcher’s Rum-Soaked Nutella French Toast” (NUTELLA!!), Margaret Maron’s “Granny Knott’s Baked Toast” (TOAST THAT IS BAKED), J. A. Jance’s “Sugarloaf Cafe Sweet Rolls”, Richard Castle’s “Morning-After Hotcakes” (yes, you are correct, it’s Castle from the TV show Castle!), Tammy Kaehler’s “Simple, Speedy Gluten-Free Banana Bread” (I love banana bread way too much), and Frankie Y. Bailey’s “Whole Wheat Wild Blueberry Lemon Pecan Muffins” (I also love muffins way too much). Moving on to yummy appetizers: Catherine Coulter’s “Big Bang Guacamole” (chips and store-bought guacamole is, like, my go-to easy dinner, especially if it's movie night at my house), Laura Lippman’s “Aunt Effie’s Salmon Ball”, and Kathleen Antrim’s “Cheesy Garlic Artichoke Dip”. Next up, soups and salads (I practically live on soups and salads; salads are the best): David Housewright’s “Corn Chowder” (I love corn and I love chowder so I'm pretty sure I'd love this), Thomas H. Cook’s “Past as Prologue (Vegetarian) Chili”, Mary Ann Corrigan’s “Take Your Pick Vegetable Salad”, and Mo Walsh’s “Mistaken Potato Salad”. And some side dishes: Hallie Ephron’s “Simplest Ever Potato Pancakes” (I love potatoes and I love pancakes so I'm pretty sure I'd love this, too) and Bill Pronzini’s “Nameless’s Italian Garlic Bread” (GARLIC BREAD 5EVER!). And finally, the drinks chapter, most recipes of which are alcoholic and as I am not yet 21 shouldn’t even be looking at too hard. But, I am pleased to say that the very last recipe in this book is Lee Child’s “Coffee, Pot of One”. Because good coffee is, like, a gift from the gods. In addition to the book’s main purpose -- serving as a cookbook -- I also found myself wanting to read the mysteries and thrillers all these authors have written. Even some of the bigger names here, like Gillian Flynn and James Patterson, I have yet to read. So now I simply must read their books -- over the tasty recipes of theirs they’ve so wonderfully shared with me. And the rest of the world, too, I suppose… The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook is a terrific and entertaining cookbook I’m so glad to have in my possession. I’ll definitely be whipping up these meals in my kitchen and bragging about them shamelessly and obnoxiously in pictures on Twitter and Instagram. ♦ So tell me... Have you read The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook? If not, is it something you'd be interested in? Do you like to cook? Do you like perusing cookbooks? What was the last thing you cooked that you're proud of? Comment below letting me know! And, as always, happy reading! Follow me @ toweroftomes on Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads | and Bloglovin’!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    This is a fun and delicious read! I really want to try out a number of recipes, even though I know I won't. I just really like reading recipes and imagining what they'll taste like. Although I might have to make an exception since many of those recipes looked pretty darn easy. It's a beautifully published book - nice texture and emboss on the front cover (hard cover) and nice-feeling, thick pages inside. Stitched well so that it will stay open without much effort as you try out the recipes. Conte This is a fun and delicious read! I really want to try out a number of recipes, even though I know I won't. I just really like reading recipes and imagining what they'll taste like. Although I might have to make an exception since many of those recipes looked pretty darn easy. It's a beautifully published book - nice texture and emboss on the front cover (hard cover) and nice-feeling, thick pages inside. Stitched well so that it will stay open without much effort as you try out the recipes. Contents are neatly organized by categories (breakfast, appetizer, soups and salads, you get the picture.) Each category has it's own table of contents so you get a tantalizing peek of what's to come in that section and from whom. I love the color scheme chosen for the book design. Black cover, dark/black pages with light-colored text and the typewriter aspect for the section openers, with cream-colored pages for the recipes. It's a lovely combination and complements the mystery theme well. While there isn't a picture for every recipe (and I don't think we need one for each), the ones included are full-color pages. For the writing aspect, many of the authors really got into their recipe introductions and included the family story (or their character's story) in the writing, some were mostly into it, and a few were barely keeping the mood (but don't let the few spoil it.) Interesting mystery history tidbits were also inserted among the recipe pages to round out the atmosphere. I also want to try out a number of authors I haven't heard of before. I often dabble in my reading, picking up whatever sounds interesting at the moment, so while I enjoy mysteries (along with many other genres), I haven't pursued them single-mindedly or I would probably recognize more of the authors. One of things I love about anthologies is being able to get a taste of many different authors (pun intended), and this cookbook is no exception.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    Very fun cookbook of recipes from America's favorite mystery writers. I loved reading the snippets before each recipe. I have bookmarked several recipes to try including: Holiday Eggs from Vivian Borne A Very Sneaky Bean Dip from Kate White Cheesy Garlic Artichoke Dip from Kathleen Antrim Corn Chowder from David Housewright Gone Broke Goulash from John McEnvoy Cathy's Coke Roast from Karin Slaughter Chicken Enchiladas from L.J. Sellers Fried Yellow Squash from Cathy Pickens The World's Best Red Sauce (A Very fun cookbook of recipes from America's favorite mystery writers. I loved reading the snippets before each recipe. I have bookmarked several recipes to try including: Holiday Eggs from Vivian Borne A Very Sneaky Bean Dip from Kate White Cheesy Garlic Artichoke Dip from Kathleen Antrim Corn Chowder from David Housewright Gone Broke Goulash from John McEnvoy Cathy's Coke Roast from Karin Slaughter Chicken Enchiladas from L.J. Sellers Fried Yellow Squash from Cathy Pickens The World's Best Red Sauce (AKA Leotta Sauce) from Allison Leotta Latvian Solstice Squares from William Burton McCormick Grandma's Killer's Killer Chocolate Cake from James Patterson Original New York City Cheesecake from Linda Stasi Cozy Southern Chocolate Chip Pudding Cake from Lois Lavrisa Other contributors include: Mary Higgins Clark, Gillian Flyn, Meg Gardiner, Sue Grafton, Peter James, Louise Penny, Mo Walsh, and many more.

  30. 4 out of 5

    ElizrdbthSpeaks

    so cool, wish there were more pics. i am a fan of Susan M. Boyer ...that is how i got here in the first place ... saw that on her Amazon profile and thought when did she do a cookbook ... i had to see it ... way back in 2015?? what??! odd. i love her mystery reads ... so fun and great style! any who ... i wish i loved "Pimento Cheese", i wouldn't touch it with a 10 foot pole .. i guess i am not truly southern ... sorry ... maybe it is 'cause of the color??! smell? i don't know. never like it. so so cool, wish there were more pics. i am a fan of Susan M. Boyer ...that is how i got here in the first place ... saw that on her Amazon profile and thought when did she do a cookbook ... i had to see it ... way back in 2015?? what??! odd. i love her mystery reads ... so fun and great style! any who ... i wish i loved "Pimento Cheese", i wouldn't touch it with a 10 foot pole .. i guess i am not truly southern ... sorry ... maybe it is 'cause of the color??! smell? i don't know. never like it. sorry. any who ... there are desserts, breakfast, appetizers, soup and salads, entrees, side dishes, cocktails ... all with a "MYSTERY" theme ... so fun. my parents (and my hubby too) like pimento cheese ...guess i will let them try it??! i enjoyed it ... hope to make something from it soon. ( ;

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