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Rock Island, Illinois -- 1929. Michael O'Sullivan is a good father and a family man -- and also the chief enforcer for John Looney, the town's Irish Godfather of crime. As Looney's Angel of Death, O'Sullivan has done the bidding of Chicago gangsters Al Capone and Frank Nitti as well -- but when a gangland execution spells tragedy for the O'Sullivan family, a grieving fathe Rock Island, Illinois -- 1929. Michael O'Sullivan is a good father and a family man -- and also the chief enforcer for John Looney, the town's Irish Godfather of crime. As Looney's Angel of Death, O'Sullivan has done the bidding of Chicago gangsters Al Capone and Frank Nitti as well -- but when a gangland execution spells tragedy for the O'Sullivan family, a grieving father and his adolescent son find themselves on a winding road fo treachery, revenge, and revelation.Writer Max Allan Collins is a two-time winner of the Private Eye Writers of America's Shamus Award for his Nathan Keller historical thrillers True Detective and Stolen Away. Award-winning artist Richard Piers Raynner spent four years working on the artwork for Road to Perdition, a labor of love that has resulted in some of the most stunningly realistic drawings of 1930s Chicago ever seen on printed page.


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Rock Island, Illinois -- 1929. Michael O'Sullivan is a good father and a family man -- and also the chief enforcer for John Looney, the town's Irish Godfather of crime. As Looney's Angel of Death, O'Sullivan has done the bidding of Chicago gangsters Al Capone and Frank Nitti as well -- but when a gangland execution spells tragedy for the O'Sullivan family, a grieving fathe Rock Island, Illinois -- 1929. Michael O'Sullivan is a good father and a family man -- and also the chief enforcer for John Looney, the town's Irish Godfather of crime. As Looney's Angel of Death, O'Sullivan has done the bidding of Chicago gangsters Al Capone and Frank Nitti as well -- but when a gangland execution spells tragedy for the O'Sullivan family, a grieving father and his adolescent son find themselves on a winding road fo treachery, revenge, and revelation.Writer Max Allan Collins is a two-time winner of the Private Eye Writers of America's Shamus Award for his Nathan Keller historical thrillers True Detective and Stolen Away. Award-winning artist Richard Piers Raynner spent four years working on the artwork for Road to Perdition, a labor of love that has resulted in some of the most stunningly realistic drawings of 1930s Chicago ever seen on printed page.

30 review for Road to Perdition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Arun Divakar

    Random browsing among a rack of comics brought me to this book. The first thought that popped up in my mind was a long list of names : Tom Hanks, Paul Newman, Jude Law and Daniel Craig ! And then like an obedient reader, I found myself a chair and sat down to read. The contents and the story line are not novel. Told from the point of view of a child, the story revolves around his father,a resourceful assassin who faces off against his former mentor in the 1930's America. The art work captures th Random browsing among a rack of comics brought me to this book. The first thought that popped up in my mind was a long list of names : Tom Hanks, Paul Newman, Jude Law and Daniel Craig ! And then like an obedient reader, I found myself a chair and sat down to read. The contents and the story line are not novel. Told from the point of view of a child, the story revolves around his father,a resourceful assassin who faces off against his former mentor in the 1930's America. The art work captures the feel of the era and is very good at what it does. I preferred the movie version to the book. The cinematography by Conrad Hall was something to behold. A good read nonetheless.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ill D

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Oh boy. Definitely gonna be spoilers in this one. Spoilers! Spoilers! Spoilers! With that caveat (x3) out of the way we can dive into the analysis. I’ve heard a lot of good things about this so, I was generally excited to dive into Collins’ work (later made into a Dumb Hanks movie). There’s definitely a lot of good here. But, there’s also a lot that falls more into the underwhelming category. The art alone (which is particularly gorgeous in its minimalist vision) pushes it toward the realm of a 4 Oh boy. Definitely gonna be spoilers in this one. Spoilers! Spoilers! Spoilers! With that caveat (x3) out of the way we can dive into the analysis. I’ve heard a lot of good things about this so, I was generally excited to dive into Collins’ work (later made into a Dumb Hanks movie). There’s definitely a lot of good here. But, there’s also a lot that falls more into the underwhelming category. The art alone (which is particularly gorgeous in its minimalist vision) pushes it toward the realm of a 4 star but, the typical comic book hi-jinks prevent it from going anywhere beyond that. In a nutshell, we get a tale of revenge that happens for no other reason than to just to fulfill its telos. Blanched in the criminal underworld of the 1930’s, Mr. O’Sullivan, our protagonist is employed in a local crime outfit as their heaviest hitter. This soldier who shares the Biblically derived moniker of Angel of Death, finds himself betrayed by his erstwhile employer. While he survives the initial shoot-out, matricide and filicide leaves him alone in this world. Save only his first-born son (the second protagonist and narrator), vengeance becomes the predictable theme du jour. Branching all across the States, propelled by a jet-black Model T, innumerable tire treads and the bullets that follow riddle across each and every page. Featuring phenomenally intricate pencilwork, this tale becomes bathed in an artistic style that clearly has aged extraordinarily well. Your eyes will find themselves at a visual feast of sorts with beautiful landscapes and well modded depictions of historical figures, such as Capone and Looney. The same cannot be said of the story itself, nor how it unfolds however. Featuring the typical good guy lands all his bullets, and the bad guys’ never find their marks shenanigans (almost matching a Star Wars level of silliness), the level of tension never builds up to a point of solid interest. Moreover, with a strict regimen of repetition applied to these gun-duels, the action actually gets quite stale as the story continues. Add this to the fact that our main conflict never has a rationale developed, overall it ultimately feels far more deus ex machina than a properly thought out narrative. Whether or not the god came out of the machine, the lack of themes (nor central rationale) leave us with an uncomfortably uniform vision that could have tied so much more into it. More presentation than body, style once again trumps the substance. This is particularly damning considering the rich imagery utilized to merely cosmetic effect. Our protagonist (despite his murderous job description) is shown to devoutly worship at his historically accurate place of worship befitting of a stereotypical Irishman of his time, The Roman Catholic Church. Yet, never is the theology tied into the tale, nor the traditions of the church. It’s merely there to fulfill a historical effect that is far more cosmetic than the rich body it deserves. The very same criticisms can be leveled at other aspects of the historical milieu, that appear well mined and (on prima facie at least) portray a strong accuracy, are woefully undeveloped. Further examples include that of the G-Men whose characters are never developed nor the political goings-ons behind the scenes. Equally lame are portrayals of the bad guys who are villainous in nature for no other reason than to perform their role in the story. Themes of poverty, corruption, and the ever changing culture of the States are absent of their furiously powerful historical dynamism. Plagued by artistic blinders, all focus is placed (for the most part) upon our (admittedly) uneven duo of protagonists. Favoring a low level of magnetism the relationship between form and function, is actually dismayingly lacking in a department that should be so much more. Forms might match their functions (think how all the bad guys in Tarentino’s first two movies all wear black suits w/black ties) but they’re developed into anything deservingly complex. Conversely, Tarentino’s villains (in Pulp Fiction and Reservoir Dogs) are all built into thoroughly believable and enjoyable characters. Sometimes you actually can have your cake and eat it too, and Collins seemingly would have us favoring possession over a fully belly. In either case, the truly phenomenal art-work propels it toward the gravity of a 4 star rating, so that’s where my rating will land. But, be sure to cast a critical eye uponst the pages and you’ll see more of a nude emperor than anything. Make sure to consume on a full stomach.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Himanshu Karmacharya

    Road to Perdition blends real people with fictional characters to deliver an emotional crime noir family drama. When Michael O' Sullivan, an enforcer for the Irish mob, is betrayed by his masters, he takes his son and flees while also planning revenge. The title of the books signifies more than just their escape attempt to Perdition, USA. It also signifies the downfall of the character, himself. The writing is amazing with realistic dialogues, and interesting plot. The artwork is very detailed and Road to Perdition blends real people with fictional characters to deliver an emotional crime noir family drama. When Michael O' Sullivan, an enforcer for the Irish mob, is betrayed by his masters, he takes his son and flees while also planning revenge. The title of the books signifies more than just their escape attempt to Perdition, USA. It also signifies the downfall of the character, himself. The writing is amazing with realistic dialogues, and interesting plot. The artwork is very detailed and some panels are just so beautiful. But, there are times when the artwork feels static, especially during action scenes. Road to Perdition is an underappreciated graphic novel, and so is the movie adaptation. Both are amazing, and need more attention.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sud666

    Road to Perdition is the original story off of which the Tom Hanks movie was made. As with most things, the book is far, far superior. Michael O'Sullivan is a good family man. He served during World War 1 and was a good and decorated soldier. Mike O'Sullivan also happens to be a top level assassin for a mob boss named Looney. O'Sullivan keeps his work and family strictly apart. One day his young son sneaks into the back of a car to see what his father does and witness a mob execution- Mike O'Sul Road to Perdition is the original story off of which the Tom Hanks movie was made. As with most things, the book is far, far superior. Michael O'Sullivan is a good family man. He served during World War 1 and was a good and decorated soldier. Mike O'Sullivan also happens to be a top level assassin for a mob boss named Looney. O'Sullivan keeps his work and family strictly apart. One day his young son sneaks into the back of a car to see what his father does and witness a mob execution- Mike O'Sullivan is aka the Angel of Death. Unfortunately, Looney's half-wit son notices O'Sullivan's son. This puts into motion a violent chain of events. Mike O'Sullivan in this story is a force of nature. Starting with the Looney crime family and its business connections, which reach all the way into Al Capone's mob in Chicago. This is at once a story of violent retribution, a father-son bonding story and a great inside look at the Prohibition Era criminal gangs. While the artwork is, at best, decent-this is a powerful work of prose with the art there to add depth to the story.Some great conversations include- Mike O'Sullivan: "I'm like a soldier. And a soldier does his duty." Son: "Even....killing?" Mike: "That's what soldier's do." Son: "It seems....wrong..the church teaches us thou shall not kill..." Mike: "The church is right. But, I have a duty to my family, as well. That means I have to work. And being a soldier son--that's the only work I know." Son: "I..I don't want to be a soldier" Mike: "Good" The entire story is told from the son's recollections and from crime historians, since the son wasn't inside during the shoot outs but rather was able to read the history books about what happened. The son's line of work at the end was superbly done. I enjoyed this on every level. While the art is never top notch the story IS. Read it for the moral story, read it for action, for violence and for a great revenge story. But also pay attention the the lessons passing between son and father. Mike O'Sullivan, the Angel of Death is a great character. Well done! Highly recommended to anyone who likes a great story.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Just a plain old black and white graphic novel. WHOA! Hold it right there partner! That description does not even come close when we are talking about this book. The story line itself really was amazing enough. Now look in the back of the book at the blurb about the illustrator. It took him a total of four, that is correct, no misprint here, four long years just to do the illustrations for this book. I really love how my mind was able to actually bleed color and breathe emotion into each panel. Just a plain old black and white graphic novel. WHOA! Hold it right there partner! That description does not even come close when we are talking about this book. The story line itself really was amazing enough. Now look in the back of the book at the blurb about the illustrator. It took him a total of four, that is correct, no misprint here, four long years just to do the illustrations for this book. I really love how my mind was able to actually bleed color and breathe emotion into each panel. This is due to the great care that was taken by the illustrator in creating each panel to fit the story. And the story itself is so amazing! With great characters like Nitti, Capone, Ness and entering stage right The Angel. I really hope you have not seen the movie before reading this book. I feel strongly about the fact that this is one of those books that should be read before watching the movie. Anyhow give this one a shot, no pun intended, and I feel that you will not be disappointed.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mahabubur Rahman

    After seen the movie, "Road to Perdition," I thought to read the book. I was not disappointed. I enjoyed the fact that the movie did not deviate from what the author wrote, as so many other movies tend to do. The 1920's and 1930's were a very different world from what we live in, however this story still has a grain of the truth that lies inside parents ... we don't want our children to fall into some of the traps we found ourselves entwined in. A well written novel that will keep you turning the After seen the movie, "Road to Perdition," I thought to read the book. I was not disappointed. I enjoyed the fact that the movie did not deviate from what the author wrote, as so many other movies tend to do. The 1920's and 1930's were a very different world from what we live in, however this story still has a grain of the truth that lies inside parents ... we don't want our children to fall into some of the traps we found ourselves entwined in. A well written novel that will keep you turning the pages.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jesse A

    Not an exceptional story but very emotionally striking. Good to read but I probably won't read it again. Not an exceptional story but very emotionally striking. Good to read but I probably won't read it again.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Harold

    Thoroughly enjoyable. I read the new "expanded novel." It really doesn't add anything to the movie but good never the less. Collins owes something of the plot to Donald E. Westlake's "The Outfit." A Parker novel written under the Richard Stark pseudonym. Also I am struck by how prolific Collins is. He can crank them out with amazing regularity. Collins also wrote a sequel. "The Road to Purgatory." I think that will be my next book. I'd like to have seen Bob Hope and Bing Crosby do these Road Mov Thoroughly enjoyable. I read the new "expanded novel." It really doesn't add anything to the movie but good never the less. Collins owes something of the plot to Donald E. Westlake's "The Outfit." A Parker novel written under the Richard Stark pseudonym. Also I am struck by how prolific Collins is. He can crank them out with amazing regularity. Collins also wrote a sequel. "The Road to Purgatory." I think that will be my next book. I'd like to have seen Bob Hope and Bing Crosby do these Road Movies!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Picked this up on a whim while browsing the graphic novels in the local library. There was a popular film made from this graphic novel. Of course, the title was familiar to me from the film (which I can't remember if I've seen or not). I was in the middle of reading another crime/murder mystery book and felt like dipping into that genre in an easy to read format. This is highly entertaining and a quick paced gangster read. The detailed black and white graphics meld perfectly with the story and d Picked this up on a whim while browsing the graphic novels in the local library. There was a popular film made from this graphic novel. Of course, the title was familiar to me from the film (which I can't remember if I've seen or not). I was in the middle of reading another crime/murder mystery book and felt like dipping into that genre in an easy to read format. This is highly entertaining and a quick paced gangster read. The detailed black and white graphics meld perfectly with the story and don't interfere with the story's momentum. It's a small manga style and is a homage to the manga story Lone Wolf and the Cub with an element of The Untouchables. Read it in one sitting.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    This was a quick read and entertaining enough. Ordinarily, I can't stand books/films about the mafia or the Prohibition era in the US but I've read good things about this book and thought I'd give it a go. While this is a story about vengeance for a depraved and unnecessary act of violence, carried out typically with further acts of violence, I can only have sympathy for the kids in it. I can't really sympathise with the protagonist, Michael O'Sullivan, who is, after all, a gun for hire who made This was a quick read and entertaining enough. Ordinarily, I can't stand books/films about the mafia or the Prohibition era in the US but I've read good things about this book and thought I'd give it a go. While this is a story about vengeance for a depraved and unnecessary act of violence, carried out typically with further acts of violence, I can only have sympathy for the kids in it. I can't really sympathise with the protagonist, Michael O'Sullivan, who is, after all, a gun for hire who made a good living from killing other people. Yes, he was betrayed and most people can empathise with a victim of betrayal, but he is essentially a killer who, one day, finds that it is he and his family who are the targets. The story does try to show O'Sullivan as both an honourable and a family man. He cares a lot for his son whom he takes with him on the eponymous road. He is a religious man who seeks forgiveness for his sins in the confessional box and prays for his victims. He cares about what happens to innocent bystanders and uses some non-violent means to cause trouble for other mobsters. But, for the most part, he simply mows down a large number of mobsters without taking so much as a flesh wound! This effectively makes O'Sullivan a vigilante-style superhero, not entirely unlike Alan Moore's character, Rorschach, in Watchmen. Of course, Road to Perdition is a graphic novel, like Watchmen, so maybe a larger-than-life character is a requisite for comic books of any genre. The author's introduction about how he came to write the book and how the process of collaboration evolved with editor, Andrew Helfer, and graphic artist, Richard P. Rayner, was interesting to read, as was the brief note at the end on what parts of the novel were based on fact, 'more or less'. Because of the historical nature of the novel, involving real gangsters like Al Capone, Frank Nitti and John Looney - even if various events and dates were wholly fictionalised (the novel is set in 1930 but events involving the Looneys occurred in the early '20s) - it has the potential to encourage readers to follow up on the subject matter and learn more about what really happened in this period of American history.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    I read this after I'd seen the movie, I do remember when watching the movie that it reminded of something, but I just couldn't place my finger on it. It all became clear once I read the Graphic Novel... this is an american interpretation of Kauzo Koike's Lone Wolf & Cub. And it's a damned good one too! Although the art did seem to focus more on the characters than the scenery... there are very few longshots, most of the illustrations are close-ups of the characters. I found this unusual, but tended I read this after I'd seen the movie, I do remember when watching the movie that it reminded of something, but I just couldn't place my finger on it. It all became clear once I read the Graphic Novel... this is an american interpretation of Kauzo Koike's Lone Wolf & Cub. And it's a damned good one too! Although the art did seem to focus more on the characters than the scenery... there are very few longshots, most of the illustrations are close-ups of the characters. I found this unusual, but tended to like it nonetheless. The movie did variate from some of the book's story, but like I said, having seen the movie first I didn't really mind. The movie is good in its own right. The book is simply excellent.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    An excellent re-imagining of Lone Wolf and Cub. Gritty, bloody, cathartic.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chad Jordahl

    I picked this up because I heard about on the Comic Tropes YouTube channel. Relatively straightforward story, but enjoyable. Historical fiction with a good number of real life people as characters -- many of whom I didn't know were real people until I read about it later. The art is very good, highly professional and accomplished... the outlines and composition are realistic (postures, proportions, expressions, environments, etc.) but the style is sort of scribbl-y I guess you'd call it? The art I picked this up because I heard about on the Comic Tropes YouTube channel. Relatively straightforward story, but enjoyable. Historical fiction with a good number of real life people as characters -- many of whom I didn't know were real people until I read about it later. The art is very good, highly professional and accomplished... the outlines and composition are realistic (postures, proportions, expressions, environments, etc.) but the style is sort of scribbl-y I guess you'd call it? The artist actually deploys a couple of different art styles. As good as the art is, I do have a beef: most of the characters look kinda different from page to page. Like for example, the boy looks anywhere from 8 to 12 or so through the course of the book (which takes place over weeks, not years). It's fine, not a huge deal, and look I've always thought it was super impressive when artists can do hundreds of drawings of the same character in tons of different poses and angles and have them all look like the same person. But these differences were enough to throw me off and distract from the experience.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

    I'm not too big on gangster stories most of the time, but framing this as a somber revenge actioner let me get behind it. It's a good story with a strong ending, fantastic detailed artwork, and attention to historical detail. I'm not too big on gangster stories most of the time, but framing this as a somber revenge actioner let me get behind it. It's a good story with a strong ending, fantastic detailed artwork, and attention to historical detail.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kieran

    Lives up to the hype.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ariel

    Really good

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chandni

    While I enjoyed the story and the themes in this graphic novel, I can't say the art style did a lot for me. I didn't mind it was in black and white, but it just wasn't as defined as I wanted it to be. I think I prefer the movie version to this. While I enjoyed the story and the themes in this graphic novel, I can't say the art style did a lot for me. I didn't mind it was in black and white, but it just wasn't as defined as I wanted it to be. I think I prefer the movie version to this.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Drivetime.Fm

    Q: Before Road to Perdition was made into a 2002 movie starring Tom Hanks, it was an influential graphic novel that told the story of an Illinois mob enforcer on the run from his boss because of a murder witnessed by his 12-year-old son. Who wrote the graphic novel Road to Perdition?

  19. 5 out of 5

    John

    I used to read a lot of comics, before graduating to graphic novels, although they now are infrequent visitors to my reading list. This is a “normal” paperback tale of murder and mayhem back in the time of prohibition and ties in some real characters, notably Al Capone. The storytelling, both verbally and pictorially is good, and the plotting and pacing excellent. It is hard to relate particularly to a killer for hire, but the Irishman (a different one) does generate some empathy. Collins is a s I used to read a lot of comics, before graduating to graphic novels, although they now are infrequent visitors to my reading list. This is a “normal” paperback tale of murder and mayhem back in the time of prohibition and ties in some real characters, notably Al Capone. The storytelling, both verbally and pictorially is good, and the plotting and pacing excellent. It is hard to relate particularly to a killer for hire, but the Irishman (a different one) does generate some empathy. Collins is a skilled writer and his introduction is a must-read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Danny Shelton

    Over the course of an evening I read this novel, and it was the first graphic novel I had actually read. I feel like this story is heavily influenced by Japanese Samurai culture. O'Sullivan, the main character alongside his son, was previously a soldier learned in the art of war, and coming from a lower class Irish family he finds little opportunity after the war than through the same art, working with the mafia. He is skilled in his profession and is apparently unmatched, while still focusing o Over the course of an evening I read this novel, and it was the first graphic novel I had actually read. I feel like this story is heavily influenced by Japanese Samurai culture. O'Sullivan, the main character alongside his son, was previously a soldier learned in the art of war, and coming from a lower class Irish family he finds little opportunity after the war than through the same art, working with the mafia. He is skilled in his profession and is apparently unmatched, while still focusing on raising his children to be just, hoping for a better life for them. When he is betrayed and his family murdered, leaving only O'Sullivan and his son, his wrath is immense. I hadn't had any experience with graphic novels prior to this, and from this introduction it opened me up to a field which was especially appealing to me, as it mixes both artwork and literature. While the general story in this was simple it still accomplishes much in the way of empathy, although I can only wonder how screwed up O'Sullivan Jr ends up when he is an adult.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    This was quite a surprise to me. I knew that the story was a graphic novel and a very good one at that long before the film reached the headlines - however it never really appealed to me - I don't know why it just never really registered. Well a chance encounter with all 3 volumes (they are listed here and I will be started number 2 shortly) at a local charity shop - I thought I would take a gamble - well here I am finishing volume one and I must admit I am impressed. The artwork though atmosphe This was quite a surprise to me. I knew that the story was a graphic novel and a very good one at that long before the film reached the headlines - however it never really appealed to me - I don't know why it just never really registered. Well a chance encounter with all 3 volumes (they are listed here and I will be started number 2 shortly) at a local charity shop - I thought I would take a gamble - well here I am finishing volume one and I must admit I am impressed. The artwork though atmospheric is nothing special, however the storyline is thrilling and engaging and once I started I didn't want to stop. I am very impressed with it and would recommend it - not only that I plan now to start on the next one straight away.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    I remember really enjoying the film, but really remembering anything about it. I'd been meaning to check out the Graphic Novel for awhile, and was happy to find on the shelf of my local library. I loved the art, and thought that the mix of historical truths with the fiction gave this short book some needed depth to its world. I enjoyed the grit and violence of it, and completely devoured the book, but overall, it's take-it-or-leave-it fare. If you like noir/gangster stories, and comics, you can' I remember really enjoying the film, but really remembering anything about it. I'd been meaning to check out the Graphic Novel for awhile, and was happy to find on the shelf of my local library. I loved the art, and thought that the mix of historical truths with the fiction gave this short book some needed depth to its world. I enjoyed the grit and violence of it, and completely devoured the book, but overall, it's take-it-or-leave-it fare. If you like noir/gangster stories, and comics, you can't go wrong, but otherwise, there's plenty I'd recommend ahead of this in the wide world of comics.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Doctor Alpha

    A very good noir story where the main protagonist doesn't live an "existential" edgy and DARRRRRRRKKKKK AND GRITTYYYYYYYYY crisis and, most important, IS NOT A PSYCHO NOR A VIOLENT BY NATURE BY ANY MEAN EVEN IF CONSTANTLY SORROUNDED BY VIOLENCE AND COSTANTLY KILLING MOBS. Take that in the balls, Frank Miller! The only gripe I have is on the art side, which occasionally take a turn down, but it's highly recommended nonetheless. Edit: avoid at all costs the movie based on this book, they completely A very good noir story where the main protagonist doesn't live an "existential" edgy and DARRRRRRRKKKKK AND GRITTYYYYYYYYY crisis and, most important, IS NOT A PSYCHO NOR A VIOLENT BY NATURE BY ANY MEAN EVEN IF CONSTANTLY SORROUNDED BY VIOLENCE AND COSTANTLY KILLING MOBS. Take that in the balls, Frank Miller! The only gripe I have is on the art side, which occasionally take a turn down, but it's highly recommended nonetheless. Edit: avoid at all costs the movie based on this book, they completely butchered the source material for whatever reason they only know and not just because movie Vs. comic logic. The movie is crap, plain and simple.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Road To Perdition was a great comic, it follows the story of a little boy and his father. The father turns out to be into crime which leads to the son almost becoming batman, he became more of a Carl from the Walking Dead, although later he definitely becomes batman. This comic had a great story and was very enjoyable, although it seemed long it was a quick book to read through. I would recommend this to anyone who is into action and likes gangsters.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dominick

    This gangland graphic novel is fairly well-rendered and has its moments, but Collins really lacks the subtleties as a writer that would make it really effective, and the art is at best mediocre. The movie changes a lot and is overall probably the better work--which is rare.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    Had no idea that this was a book before it was a movie, until a friend suggested it to me. And I'm glad he did. It's great. It reads much like a movie storyboard; I've never seen the movie but I will now. Time to look for more Max Allan Collins. Had no idea that this was a book before it was a movie, until a friend suggested it to me. And I'm glad he did. It's great. It reads much like a movie storyboard; I've never seen the movie but I will now. Time to look for more Max Allan Collins.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dave Riley

    RTP is a riveting read. Very much B grade movie melodrama but in its npir moments it works a treat. Like a 30s film it plays on family times and the draw of sentiment. Seemingly out of place/out of date ...but the whole package works.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Moataz Ibrahim

    The story of Michael Sullivan. He might have been the embodiment of evil, and he might have been a holy man. But as we go through the book, we know from the perspective of his son that he was just a man, an honorable man, with merits and flaws.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Yazan Bakleh

    One of the greatest books in my Opinion ...

  30. 5 out of 5

    47Time

    The Prohibition and the Great Depression are still in effect in 1930 when Michael Jr., curious what his father Michael does for a living, follows him to his job. Michael is a feared enforcer for the Looney Gang that controls the Tri-Cities. He makes his son understand how important it is to not tell anyone about what he witnessed and how important duty is. Unfortunately, Conner Looney isn't convinced that Michael is to be trusted any more, so boss John Looney orders one of his underbosses to kil The Prohibition and the Great Depression are still in effect in 1930 when Michael Jr., curious what his father Michael does for a living, follows him to his job. Michael is a feared enforcer for the Looney Gang that controls the Tri-Cities. He makes his son understand how important it is to not tell anyone about what he witnessed and how important duty is. Unfortunately, Conner Looney isn't convinced that Michael is to be trusted any more, so boss John Looney orders one of his underbosses to kill Michael. The target survives, but his wife and son Peter aren't so lucky. They get killed by Connor himself. Michael Jr. was away from home at the time and gets back only to catch a glimpse of the killer as he leaves behind his mother and brother's dead bodies. His father soon arrives to retrieve him, then he leaves a declaration of war for the Looney Gang that will see many mob enforcers, lawyers, bankers and corrupt police killed by the vengeful Michael. (view spoiler)[They make a stop in Chicago where Michael learns that Capone sides with the Looney Gang. Michael obtains proof of Looney's money laundering which earns him a repreive from Eliot Ness. Ness is more interested in getting the Looneys off the streets. He lets Michael and his son go and uses a tip from Michael to capture John Looney. To strike a blow at the Looney gang's businesses, Michael starts gathering the dirty money from several banks and splits the money with the bankers. The destruction of a floating casino finally makes the Looney's business less profitable for Capone who gives up Connor's location. Michael quickly kills Connor and declares his vendetta over. Unfortuntunately, Capone still wants Michael out of the picture. His men shoot Michael fatally. Michael Jr. only has time to take his father for his last rites before he dies of his wounds. The son goes on to become a priest and to write his father's story as seen from his own eyes. (hide spoiler)]

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