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Using Evidence of Student Learning to Improve Higher Education

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American higher education needs a major reframing of student learning outcomes assessment Dynamic changes are underway in American higher education. New providers, emerging technologies, cost concerns, student debt, and nagging doubts about quality all call out the need for institutions to show evidence of student learning. From scholars at the National Institute for Learn American higher education needs a major reframing of student learning outcomes assessment Dynamic changes are underway in American higher education. New providers, emerging technologies, cost concerns, student debt, and nagging doubts about quality all call out the need for institutions to show evidence of student learning. From scholars at the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA), Using Evidence of Student Learning to Improve Higher Education presents a reframed conception and approach to student learning outcomes assessment. The authors explain why it is counterproductive to view collecting and using evidence of student accomplishment as primarily a compliance activity. Today's circumstances demand a fresh and more strategic approach to the processes by which evidence about student learning is obtained and used to inform efforts to improve teaching, learning, and decision-making. Whether you're in the classroom, an administrative office, or on an assessment committee, data about what students know and are able to do are critical for guiding changes that are needed in institutional policies and practices to improve student learning and success. Use this book to: Understand how and why student learning outcomes assessment can enhance student accomplishment and increase institutional effectiveness Shift the view of assessment from being externally driven to internally motivated Learn how assessment results can help inform decision-making Use assessment data to manage change and improve student success Gauging student learning is necessary if institutions are to prepare students to meet the 21st century needs of employers and live an economically independent, civically responsible life. For assessment professionals and educational leaders, Using Evidence of Student Learning to Improve Higher Education offers both a compelling rationale and practical advice for making student learning outcomes assessment more effective and efficient.


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American higher education needs a major reframing of student learning outcomes assessment Dynamic changes are underway in American higher education. New providers, emerging technologies, cost concerns, student debt, and nagging doubts about quality all call out the need for institutions to show evidence of student learning. From scholars at the National Institute for Learn American higher education needs a major reframing of student learning outcomes assessment Dynamic changes are underway in American higher education. New providers, emerging technologies, cost concerns, student debt, and nagging doubts about quality all call out the need for institutions to show evidence of student learning. From scholars at the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA), Using Evidence of Student Learning to Improve Higher Education presents a reframed conception and approach to student learning outcomes assessment. The authors explain why it is counterproductive to view collecting and using evidence of student accomplishment as primarily a compliance activity. Today's circumstances demand a fresh and more strategic approach to the processes by which evidence about student learning is obtained and used to inform efforts to improve teaching, learning, and decision-making. Whether you're in the classroom, an administrative office, or on an assessment committee, data about what students know and are able to do are critical for guiding changes that are needed in institutional policies and practices to improve student learning and success. Use this book to: Understand how and why student learning outcomes assessment can enhance student accomplishment and increase institutional effectiveness Shift the view of assessment from being externally driven to internally motivated Learn how assessment results can help inform decision-making Use assessment data to manage change and improve student success Gauging student learning is necessary if institutions are to prepare students to meet the 21st century needs of employers and live an economically independent, civically responsible life. For assessment professionals and educational leaders, Using Evidence of Student Learning to Improve Higher Education offers both a compelling rationale and practical advice for making student learning outcomes assessment more effective and efficient.

49 review for Using Evidence of Student Learning to Improve Higher Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    MJ (The Book Recluse)

    Using Evidence of Student Learning to Improve Higher Education breaks apart assessment into three main sections. It looks at what has worked in the past by analyzing what evidence and practice has shown to be effective. It also analyzes the stakeholders in educational assessment with a strong emphases on executive administrators and faculty. Lastly, it looks to where assessment of higher education is headed. While this volume self professes not to be a handbook of assessment, it is a guide throu Using Evidence of Student Learning to Improve Higher Education breaks apart assessment into three main sections. It looks at what has worked in the past by analyzing what evidence and practice has shown to be effective. It also analyzes the stakeholders in educational assessment with a strong emphases on executive administrators and faculty. Lastly, it looks to where assessment of higher education is headed. While this volume self professes not to be a handbook of assessment, it is a guide through the history and best practices of assessment as seen through the NILOA members. It is a fairly complete work that adds to the assessment literature by bringing multiple components into one collection, expanding on those components, and analyzing them in a clear and concise way. However, until the last chapter the inclusion of staff is non-existent despite touching on items that may commonly be done by staff. Yet, the very reasons why departments utilization of staff to support assessment efforts were touched on the support role was not brought to be part of the conversation. While this work is more theoretical than applied it does bring to light common difficulties and many less talked about aspects of the practicalities of higher education assessment.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    One of the best books on assessment that I've ever read. It's not a how-to, but a great contextual and philosophical read to promote better practice.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Wu

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    Cyndi Louden

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    Jen

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    Stefan Yates

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    Angela

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    Rachel Bartholomew

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    Dean Ramser

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    Beth

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    Clifton Franklund

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    Mello-Goldner Diane

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    Becki Elkins

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    Diane

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    E

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    Kacey Thorne

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    Kristen Mckinney

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    Kathryn Allen

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    Melissa Clark

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    Amy

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    Doug Holton

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    Brandi Stacey

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    Faculty Commons

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