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Licensed to Lie: Exposing Corruption in the Department of Justice

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A tragic suicide, a likely murder, wrongful imprisonment, and gripping courtroom scenes draw readers into this compelling story giving them a frightening perspective on justice corrupted and who should be accountable when evidence is withheld. Licensed to Lie: Exposing Corruption in the Department of Justice is the true story of the strong-arm, illegal, and unethical tacti A tragic suicide, a likely murder, wrongful imprisonment, and gripping courtroom scenes draw readers into this compelling story giving them a frightening perspective on justice corrupted and who should be accountable when evidence is withheld. Licensed to Lie: Exposing Corruption in the Department of Justice is the true story of the strong-arm, illegal, and unethical tactics used by headline-grabbing federal prosecutors in their narcissistic pursuit of power. Its scope reaches from the US Department of Justice to the US Senate, the FBI, and the White House. This true story is a scathing attack on corrupt prosecutors, the judges who turned a blind eye to these injustices, and the president who has promoted them to powerful political positions. Former federal prosecutor under nine US attorneys from both political parties over ten years and three districts, Sidney Powell was lead counsel in 350 criminal appeals for the United States and more than 150 since in private practice. It was from her experience in several of her cases that she felt compelled to write LICENSED TO LIE: Exposing Corruption in the Department of Justice after seeing a core group of federal prosecutors break all the rules, make up crimes, hide evidence, and send innocent people to prison. The book reads like a legal thriller, but it names the prosecutors who then rose to positions of great power and the judges who turned a blind eye to their abuses of unfettered power. Sidneyis highly sought to comment on current legal issues and government investigations--especially the special investigation lead by Robert Mueller and his chief lieutenant Andrew Weissmann, who is a true villain in LICENSED TO LIE.


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A tragic suicide, a likely murder, wrongful imprisonment, and gripping courtroom scenes draw readers into this compelling story giving them a frightening perspective on justice corrupted and who should be accountable when evidence is withheld. Licensed to Lie: Exposing Corruption in the Department of Justice is the true story of the strong-arm, illegal, and unethical tacti A tragic suicide, a likely murder, wrongful imprisonment, and gripping courtroom scenes draw readers into this compelling story giving them a frightening perspective on justice corrupted and who should be accountable when evidence is withheld. Licensed to Lie: Exposing Corruption in the Department of Justice is the true story of the strong-arm, illegal, and unethical tactics used by headline-grabbing federal prosecutors in their narcissistic pursuit of power. Its scope reaches from the US Department of Justice to the US Senate, the FBI, and the White House. This true story is a scathing attack on corrupt prosecutors, the judges who turned a blind eye to these injustices, and the president who has promoted them to powerful political positions. Former federal prosecutor under nine US attorneys from both political parties over ten years and three districts, Sidney Powell was lead counsel in 350 criminal appeals for the United States and more than 150 since in private practice. It was from her experience in several of her cases that she felt compelled to write LICENSED TO LIE: Exposing Corruption in the Department of Justice after seeing a core group of federal prosecutors break all the rules, make up crimes, hide evidence, and send innocent people to prison. The book reads like a legal thriller, but it names the prosecutors who then rose to positions of great power and the judges who turned a blind eye to their abuses of unfettered power. Sidneyis highly sought to comment on current legal issues and government investigations--especially the special investigation lead by Robert Mueller and his chief lieutenant Andrew Weissmann, who is a true villain in LICENSED TO LIE.

30 review for Licensed to Lie: Exposing Corruption in the Department of Justice

  1. 4 out of 5

    Eddie

    The fire lit by Sidney Powell's research and discovery - corruption in the Department of Justice - can never get hot enough. Her tenacity and integrity is exactly what we need in DC, not anywhere else. Her book will make you angry. The fact that the lying, manipulative attorneys behind the DOJ scandal are not only still practicing but are being supported and promoted by the Obama administration makes me wonder why people go to law school in the first place. The book is a must read. But be prepare The fire lit by Sidney Powell's research and discovery - corruption in the Department of Justice - can never get hot enough. Her tenacity and integrity is exactly what we need in DC, not anywhere else. Her book will make you angry. The fact that the lying, manipulative attorneys behind the DOJ scandal are not only still practicing but are being supported and promoted by the Obama administration makes me wonder why people go to law school in the first place. The book is a must read. But be prepared...her findings are not easy to swallow.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Margitte

    From the blurb: A tragic suicide, a likely murder, wrongful imprisonment, and gripping courtroom scenes draw readers into this compelling story giving them a frightening perspective on justice corrupted and who should be accountable when evidence is withheld. Licensed to Lie: Exposing Corruption in the Department of Justice is the true story of the strong-arm, illegal, and unethical tactics used by headline-grabbing federal prosecutors in their narcissistic pursuit of power. Its scope reaches fr From the blurb: A tragic suicide, a likely murder, wrongful imprisonment, and gripping courtroom scenes draw readers into this compelling story giving them a frightening perspective on justice corrupted and who should be accountable when evidence is withheld. Licensed to Lie: Exposing Corruption in the Department of Justice is the true story of the strong-arm, illegal, and unethical tactics used by headline-grabbing federal prosecutors in their narcissistic pursuit of power. Its scope reaches from the US Department of Justice to the US Senate, the FBI, and the White House. This true story is a scathing attack on corrupt prosecutors, the judges who turned a blind eye to these injustices, and the president who has promoted them to powerful political positions. Chief Judge Alex Kozinsky, United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit wrote in the Foreword: Sidney Powell has more testosterone than pretty much any room full of lawyers, be they men or women. Writing a book like this more than proves it. Not only does she take on, by name, prosecutors and former prosecutors who continue to serve in powerful and responsible positions, she is also relentless in criticizing judges before whom she practiced for years. Few lawyers have the stones to do this. ... Read the entire blurb. The ENRON case had more stories to tell than was ever revealed. Powell gets to it in this book, reporting on the innocent people who went to jail due to Brady-evidence(exculpatory evidence) which was withheld from the accused citizens. The same in the Ted Stevens case. She discusses other high profile cases in which the same thing happened to innocent people. It was a riveting experience. It often felt like being in the center of a court room drama, from the lowest to highest courts in the country. If you haven't read it, you should. She takes the reader through a 'house of legal horrors', as Dr. Michael Adams, Associate Professor of English at the University of Texas expressed his opinion. He included: The greatest human ideal of Justice is only as good as the character of those who administer it, existing only if its guardians are devotees to integrity and fairness In certain prosecutors's hands this ideal proof to be worthless. Prof. Adams also said: Licensed to Lie is a disturbing, enlightening, and superbly presented account of one of the most dramatic and chilling examples of injustice in American judicial history. Written with the skill of a novelist, the keen eye of a memoirist, and the passion of an early American pamphleteer, Powell takes readers on a journey through an institutional landscape created to protect the innocent and punish the guilty. Sidney Powell is an insider. From her website: Sidney the Attorney represents individuals, corporations, and governments in federal appeals in complex commercial litigation. She has practiced law, primarily in the Fifth Federal Circuit for decades. She has been lead counsel in more than 500 federal appeals—350 of them as an Assistant United States Attorney and Appellate Section Chief in the Western and Northern Districts of Texas. She is a past president of the American Academy of Appellate Lawyers and the Bar Association of the Fifth Federal Circuit, and a member of the American Law Institute. This author, and lawyer is defending the truth and fairness in a system that is broken. Her website What probably might come as a surprise to many, is the number of verdicts which got reversed, particularly in the ENRON case, which, until today, are not reflected in Wikipedia, nor the media. In fact, the prosecutors who withheld the Brady-evidence in those cases, became superstars in the department of Justice, the White House and government. They could not be prosecuted themselves, since they have immunity. Their dirty actions were just swept under the rug. The reversal of the Ted Stevens verdict is another big surprise. It's all laid out in this book. ABSOLUTELY RECOMMENDED

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jim Hunter

    Disturbingly pertinent. Extra-legal Department of Justice practices did not begin under Attorney General Holder nor did they end there. From the persecution of Sen. Tad Stevens, thru the Enron trials right thru to the HRC investigation and the Trump investigation DOJ has jettisoned its role as upholder of justice and donned the role of rogue prosecutor. 2/2/18: Nunes Report: Refusal to present exculpatory evidence to FISA Court. Just part of what may be the worst political scandal in US History.. Disturbingly pertinent. Extra-legal Department of Justice practices did not begin under Attorney General Holder nor did they end there. From the persecution of Sen. Tad Stevens, thru the Enron trials right thru to the HRC investigation and the Trump investigation DOJ has jettisoned its role as upholder of justice and donned the role of rogue prosecutor. 2/2/18: Nunes Report: Refusal to present exculpatory evidence to FISA Court. Just part of what may be the worst political scandal in US History... it continues...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jim Brown

    DISCLAIMER: I am NOT a lawyer so a lot of the legal matter in this book were unfamiliar to me. I love this book! I hate this book in what it reveals! To me it represents several books in one. First it is a text book on legal matters and the US courts. Second it is a book on legal ethics and oath of offices by attorneys. Third it is a history book on both situations that have existed in America and the people those situations have impacted. Fourth it also reads like a crime book by everyone invol DISCLAIMER: I am NOT a lawyer so a lot of the legal matter in this book were unfamiliar to me. I love this book! I hate this book in what it reveals! To me it represents several books in one. First it is a text book on legal matters and the US courts. Second it is a book on legal ethics and oath of offices by attorneys. Third it is a history book on both situations that have existed in America and the people those situations have impacted. Fourth it also reads like a crime book by everyone involved from the defendants to the prosecutors and even to the judges involved. My overall opinion of the book thus far is so distant to what I HAD (past tense) believed about our judicial system of justice in America. I accepted the fact that innocent people could be found guilty in a court of law even though both the defense and the prosecution did their best in what they believed to be the law and the facts. But what I was not prepared for was the criminal deceit, the hiding of evidence, the misleading of witnesses, the threatening of witnesses and their families, and the lackadaisical attitude by so many judges all leading to conviction of defendants who may have been innocent and probably were innocent. In 1965 I took an Oath to Defend the Constitution of the United States. I took a similar oath in 1977. In both cases the oaths I took HAD NO EXPIRATION DATES ON THEM nor did I ever sign any document that said I no longer had a responsibility to defend the Constitution. The lawyers involved in this book also took very similar oaths of office but it was obvious from the very beginning of the book that the oaths that some of the lawyers in the book and even the judges took, had no bearing on their actions they took or failed to take. This has been one of the most interesting books I have ever read even though a lot of the legal matters discussed were over my head and hard to follow. Still, I had no difficulty in understanding how government lawyers you would have thought would have followed the law, but instead used whatever methods they thought were right, ethics be damned, to win a case. Their activities destroyed not just one life but the lives of families, friends, businesses and in the case of the Arthur Anderson case that was reversed, the loss of over 85,000 jobs and Arthur Anderson itself. While this has been an extremely interesting read, it has also been one of the most disgusting books I have ever read and that is no reflection on the author or the writing. It puts politics into our government and in this case, THAT IS NOT A GOOD THING. Who should read this book? EVERY AMERICAN! Would I give the book as a gift? Not sure that if I did the recipients would take the time to read it but I would still give it as a gift. Will I read it again? Probably not. I know what it says and I don't like what I have read but that doesn't mean you should not read it. On the contrary, if you are a dedicated American (not everyone is). then you SHOULD read it. You will see a side of government that you may have suspected existed but this confirms it. SICKENING to say the least.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tara Perry

    So well written, you forget it's a true story. And then the disbelief and anger set in. Heard about this book on the Rush Limbaugh show and decided to get it. I was surprised it was written about events from 10 years ago and the same people are still in power and are still playing their games. They are not held to account for their blatant disregard for the law. Something needs to be done or it could happen to any of us. So well written, you forget it's a true story. And then the disbelief and anger set in. Heard about this book on the Rush Limbaugh show and decided to get it. I was surprised it was written about events from 10 years ago and the same people are still in power and are still playing their games. They are not held to account for their blatant disregard for the law. Something needs to be done or it could happen to any of us.

  6. 4 out of 5

    booklady

    Sidney Powell is a polarizing figure to say the least and as such, I can only urge you to read this book for yourself. I may be able to write a review of it at some later date, but for now considering all the political turmoil in the country and the author in the center of the maelstrom (although quite apart from her excellent book here) it seems best to let it stand on its own merits. It is excellent but I also defer to this review by a legal scholar better able to assess her skills than myself Sidney Powell is a polarizing figure to say the least and as such, I can only urge you to read this book for yourself. I may be able to write a review of it at some later date, but for now considering all the political turmoil in the country and the author in the center of the maelstrom (although quite apart from her excellent book here) it seems best to let it stand on its own merits. It is excellent but I also defer to this review by a legal scholar better able to assess her skills than myself. He includes some criticisms of her book which seem valid.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Doni Parnell

    Really makes you think. Especially as several names are still in recent prosecutions.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Antonia

    This is a must read expose of what is going on in our Department of Injustice. A story of the Federal Prosecutors who covered up exculpatory evidence and defied the "Brady law" (which requires any and all evidence in favor of the defense to be given to the defense) against the small players in the Enron case as well as others (Senator Ted Stevens case -- dismissed by circuit court) to further their own careers and interests. (Today the same Federal prosecutors are working in prestigious and high This is a must read expose of what is going on in our Department of Injustice. A story of the Federal Prosecutors who covered up exculpatory evidence and defied the "Brady law" (which requires any and all evidence in favor of the defense to be given to the defense) against the small players in the Enron case as well as others (Senator Ted Stevens case -- dismissed by circuit court) to further their own careers and interests. (Today the same Federal prosecutors are working in prestigious and high paying jobs, while the innocent people they put in prison had their lives destroyed). Be aware that you will be yelling while you read this because of the lack of ethics, fairness and just blatant disregard of Constitutional law that seems to be "business as usual" for some Federal Prosecutors, including Andrew Weissmann (now top prosecutor for DOJ Special Counsel Robert Mueller). For justice to be done, there must be judges who will fairly deal justice according to the law. Failing that, we are no better than a third world despotic nation. Note that the same prosecutors who ruined the lives of innocent people, including thousands of innocent employees of Arthur Andersen accounting firm who lost their jobs are now working for Robert Mueller in the current Manafort trial. How do you think that one will turn out? Don't hold your breath for justice to be served. Read this book and get a little more perspective on what's going on; it's well written and well documented with explanation of legal policies and terms written for the lay person.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Twobchelm

    This was such an interesting read but I was truly saddened by the eye opening abuse of prosecutorial power. Lawyers, not all but some high profile withheld exculpatory evidence and ignored the Brady material that was the right of the defense. Threatening and badgering witnesses and delaying the process in order to get a win at all costs. These are well documented high profile cases that Powell leads you through citing one abuse after the other. Justice lawyers simply moved up the ladder with priv This was such an interesting read but I was truly saddened by the eye opening abuse of prosecutorial power. Lawyers, not all but some high profile withheld exculpatory evidence and ignored the Brady material that was the right of the defense. Threatening and badgering witnesses and delaying the process in order to get a win at all costs. These are well documented high profile cases that Powell leads you through citing one abuse after the other. Justice lawyers simply moved up the ladder with private companies and most eventually landed back with the.government without as much as a slap on the hand! It certainly gives you a view in to the two tiered justice system! There were ruined lives, companies and millions of taxpayers dollars wasted . Sydney Powell is a very strong and brilliant woman, I love hearing her views on TV. Great read!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mark Mortensen

    Published in 2014 this topic remains on the cutting edge of journalism today. Sidney Powell is both an astute prosecutor and defense lawyer. Through her book she fully documented her defense case that top prosecutors within the Department of Justice hid evidence to promote their personal careers in both the Enron case and the case against Alaskan U.S. Senator Stevens. Sadly high level corruption and dishonesty within the Department of Justice continues to exist, which must be cleaned up. Truth ju Published in 2014 this topic remains on the cutting edge of journalism today. Sidney Powell is both an astute prosecutor and defense lawyer. Through her book she fully documented her defense case that top prosecutors within the Department of Justice hid evidence to promote their personal careers in both the Enron case and the case against Alaskan U.S. Senator Stevens. Sadly high level corruption and dishonesty within the Department of Justice continues to exist, which must be cleaned up. Truth justice and ethics must prevail in America. On a side note: Last month North Carolina Supreme Court Chief Justice Mark Martin was a guest speaker at my rotary club. He stated that in 2008 he attended the World Justice Forum in Vienna, Austria. On the final day of the conference a member of the Egyptian group stood and proclaimed to the audience that the American judicial system was the best in the world. What followed was a standing ovation by all from 82 different nations. I hope, but wonder if those countries have the same level of faith in our system 11 years later.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Denise D.

    Why the swamp needs draining Ms. Powell does a good job weaving very intricate and complex legal issues into a story that if it wasn’t real, you would not believe. Although it seems some of the material is repetitious (how many times are you going to make the point), the level of corruption that it reveals warrants the regurgitation. It’s the only way to fully understand how many times the prosecutors tried to inflict pain on her client. The sad part about this whole story is that this could happ Why the swamp needs draining Ms. Powell does a good job weaving very intricate and complex legal issues into a story that if it wasn’t real, you would not believe. Although it seems some of the material is repetitious (how many times are you going to make the point), the level of corruption that it reveals warrants the regurgitation. It’s the only way to fully understand how many times the prosecutors tried to inflict pain on her client. The sad part about this whole story is that this could happen to any one of us “little people” who may not have the financial resources to defend ourselves like her client did. Thank you for revealing this issue. It is now up to us citizens to act to clean up this corruption by encouraging Congress to clean up the rules around Brady.

  12. 5 out of 5

    PeachyKeenTom

    This is an amazing, enlightening, and frightening story about the state of justice in this country now. It's long been obvious that justice is available only to those who can afford it, but this book shows just how it might not be available to anyone not a member of the swamp. How long will Weissmann and all the ethically challenged lawyers and judges be able to continue without any consequences to them? We see the same kind of situation happening in Washington state now - an aggressive, partisan, This is an amazing, enlightening, and frightening story about the state of justice in this country now. It's long been obvious that justice is available only to those who can afford it, but this book shows just how it might not be available to anyone not a member of the swamp. How long will Weissmann and all the ethically challenged lawyers and judges be able to continue without any consequences to them? We see the same kind of situation happening in Washington state now - an aggressive, partisan, crooked attorney general who has decided to destroy a prominent political opponent, and there is no recourse at all. The partisan media won't even tell the public. We can expect this stuff in Chicago and New York, but Olympia? How many other states have the same problems? Scary.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Martha

    I have mixed thoughts on this book. I don’t know enough about the law to know when some things were accurate, stretching it, etc.But the premise that some prosecutors and judges lie because convictions are more important than truth, rings true to so many more stories. I would impressed if the author turns her attention to people who face unethical prosecutors and end up with decades or their lives lost, instead of months. Yet anything that draws attention to the need to keep our system ethical i I have mixed thoughts on this book. I don’t know enough about the law to know when some things were accurate, stretching it, etc.But the premise that some prosecutors and judges lie because convictions are more important than truth, rings true to so many more stories. I would impressed if the author turns her attention to people who face unethical prosecutors and end up with decades or their lives lost, instead of months. Yet anything that draws attention to the need to keep our system ethical is, in my opinion, a good thing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nancy George

    I just finished “Licensed To Lie” by Sidney Powell, attorney for Jim Brown in an indictment against him by our government. If you are in the camp who’s sole wish is to bring down a sitting President, I’ve no doubt you will get your wish. The book has absolute proof of the abuse of power by our Justice Dpt. to lie, conceal evidence, intimidate witnesses into lying, keep key witnesses from testifying, commit perjury, misrepresent the law to the jury and basically rewrite the law to suite their cas I just finished “Licensed To Lie” by Sidney Powell, attorney for Jim Brown in an indictment against him by our government. If you are in the camp who’s sole wish is to bring down a sitting President, I’ve no doubt you will get your wish. The book has absolute proof of the abuse of power by our Justice Dpt. to lie, conceal evidence, intimidate witnesses into lying, keep key witnesses from testifying, commit perjury, misrepresent the law to the jury and basically rewrite the law to suite their case. SHOCKING stuff! Jim Brown spent a year in prison and almost 8 years of probation while "the government had supervised him, controlled his life, and jerked him around....about a deal he warned Merrill Lynch not to do". He was completely innocent of any wrong doing. The book also goes into the abuse and injustices suffered by Sen. Ted Stevens, Dan Bayly and Rob Furst among others whose lives were unfairly damaged. "Meanwhile the prosecutors truly responsible for these injustices are not only unscathed but flourishing". "Unless and until these prosecutors are convicted in the court of public opinion, or disbarred, these very powerful and POLITICALLY CONNECTED lawyers are still licensed to lie."

  15. 4 out of 5

    Harold

    This is a book about one of the Enron trials written by the losing (appelate) counsel complaining of the varioius infractions committed by the prosecutors. She is obviously a smart person and makes a good case. Repetitively. And she is outraged. Repetitively. The problem is that she is not a disinterested observer, and it is impossible to tell when, or if, the lawyering ends and the objective reporting begins. It probably doesn't. I have no reason to believe the prosecutors in the two cases she This is a book about one of the Enron trials written by the losing (appelate) counsel complaining of the varioius infractions committed by the prosecutors. She is obviously a smart person and makes a good case. Repetitively. And she is outraged. Repetitively. The problem is that she is not a disinterested observer, and it is impossible to tell when, or if, the lawyering ends and the objective reporting begins. It probably doesn't. I have no reason to believe the prosecutors in the two cases she focuses on did not abuse their discretion and conceal evidence from the defendant, nor do I have any reason to believe the judge in the principial case wasn't totally and unthoughtfully in the hands of the prosecution. But I sure would like to hear from the other side, and I would like a reporter to investigate how rampant such behavior is. Should I worry that these cases are typical, and prosecutors in this country will sacrifice justice for an ill-gotten victory over an innocent man or is this just aberrational? Without a feel for that, this book is a lot less important to me than it is to her.

  16. 4 out of 5

    DoingTimeWithBernie DoingTimeWithBernie

    Ms. Powell writes a very long mediocre hackneyed fiction work! The author markets this book as a commentary on the injustice of our Justice system. Well, perhaps a non-fiction book would have been appropriate because this book fell flat for me. It makes Sidney Powell appear as a disgruntled DA with an ax to grind and even less skill as an author. She is, however, giving criminal and author, Bernard Kerik, some competition for what Matt Taibi called the "most disgusting book of" the year (From Ja Ms. Powell writes a very long mediocre hackneyed fiction work! The author markets this book as a commentary on the injustice of our Justice system. Well, perhaps a non-fiction book would have been appropriate because this book fell flat for me. It makes Sidney Powell appear as a disgruntled DA with an ax to grind and even less skill as an author. She is, however, giving criminal and author, Bernard Kerik, some competition for what Matt Taibi called the "most disgusting book of" the year (From Jailer to Jailed)! Ha! Happy reading, everyone!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Opa

    I really like legal thrillers. With fiction authors like Grisham, Rosenfelt, and Martini, the good guys win and the bad guys lose. With the non-fiction author Sidney Powell, the good guys lose and the bad guys get promoted into the Obama administration. Powell chronicles the real trials of the Enron task force and the corruption case of Alaskan Senator Stevens which take place about the same time. She writes well and her book is just as intense as any fiction legal thriller. The prosecutors in t I really like legal thrillers. With fiction authors like Grisham, Rosenfelt, and Martini, the good guys win and the bad guys lose. With the non-fiction author Sidney Powell, the good guys lose and the bad guys get promoted into the Obama administration. Powell chronicles the real trials of the Enron task force and the corruption case of Alaskan Senator Stevens which take place about the same time. She writes well and her book is just as intense as any fiction legal thriller. The prosecutors in these two efforts have no integrity. They lie, unlawfully withhold evidence, and are totally unethical. 85,000 innocent people lost their jobs on one conviction that was overturned 9-0 by the Supreme Court. Other convictions put innocent men in prison, crushed them financially, and destroyed families. The convictions were later overturned by an appellate court because of the prosecutorial unlawful actions. The innocent lost big and the despicable Federal Prosecutors were awarded and promoted into top positions in our Justice Department and FBI. Two of them are currently working on the despicable Mueller Team going after our President. The spineless Federal Judges let these despicable prosecutors get away with real constitutional crimes that truly hurt thousands of innocents. The takeaway: don't get caught in a Federal Court. There is no justice with cowardly judges and despicable, unethical prosecutors. I hope I said despicable enough times.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell Kaufman

    Sidney Powell, a former assistant US attorney, now gone over to the defense side, exposes, through her participation as appellate counsel in the Enron/Merril Lynch and knowledge of the Ted Stevens case, the corruption of Federal Prosecutors. With the complicity of willing judges, these attorneys (in both the Bush and Obama justice departments) have forgotten that they are supposed to be seeking justice and instead have become intimidating bullies, making up nonexistent crimes by misuse of statut Sidney Powell, a former assistant US attorney, now gone over to the defense side, exposes, through her participation as appellate counsel in the Enron/Merril Lynch and knowledge of the Ted Stevens case, the corruption of Federal Prosecutors. With the complicity of willing judges, these attorneys (in both the Bush and Obama justice departments) have forgotten that they are supposed to be seeking justice and instead have become intimidating bullies, making up nonexistent crimes by misuse of statutes, and knowingly withholding exculpatory evidence from the defense,only to be rewarded with better and better jobs. Ms. Powell seems surprised that this occurs and displays considerable anger and disappointment. If she had written this with the aid of a ghost writer, it might have been quite good. Despite the "I said...he said...the judge said..." writing style, it is worthwhile if only because it sheds light on the danger of overzealous prosecutors.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Robert Hersh

    Fascinating book, and every bit as frightening! This book helps clarify what’s going on right now in the FBI/DOJ. Mueller witch hunt investigation into what’s being described as Russian meddling in the 2016 elections is written throughout these pages. It is very obvious that many of the Enron tricks still reside in the front pockets of Mueller “investigators” and DOJ Lawyers. The book reads like a novel rather than the non-fiction that it is. It’s simply far too scary that we know it’s factual! Fascinating book, and every bit as frightening! This book helps clarify what’s going on right now in the FBI/DOJ. Mueller witch hunt investigation into what’s being described as Russian meddling in the 2016 elections is written throughout these pages. It is very obvious that many of the Enron tricks still reside in the front pockets of Mueller “investigators” and DOJ Lawyers. The book reads like a novel rather than the non-fiction that it is. It’s simply far too scary that we know it’s factual! The damage to our country brought about by Barack Obama and his minions will continue to haunt our justice system for years to come!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Gilliam

    This is a must read This shows the corruption in our system of laws. What happened here did not happen overnight. It must of been happening for years. Now this same system is going after President Trump. It fixed it so Hillary would not be investigated or charged. And know it is trying to over throw a election.

  21. 4 out of 5

    John Rose

    Great book Great read scary power these prosecutors have and no liability when they lie or withhold evidence from the defense They should be held to account and have there immunity taken away and be responsible for all the damage they cause

  22. 5 out of 5

    Steve Trevino

    A little long/repetitive, but interesting and scary.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bobbie

    Amazing book telling the corruption by prosecutors hiding exculpatory evidence at trials. Reads like a novel

  24. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    Prosecution or persecution? Revealing look at the damage the Justice Department has done to our republic by strong-arm legal tactics designed to win court cases at all costs.

  25. 4 out of 5

    SF

    Good one.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Nicole

    I give this 3 stars in spite of how difficult it is to read and pay attention to and how the writer has a clear bias in all the matters she cites. The Good: believable because she proves the corruption. Like a good lawyer, she addresses every single claim (that we know of) and refutes it, over and over again. She is very thorough and leaves no stone unturned, giving detailed examples of just how the DOJ promotes corruption. She proves it and does so over the course of something like 10 years. The I give this 3 stars in spite of how difficult it is to read and pay attention to and how the writer has a clear bias in all the matters she cites. The Good: believable because she proves the corruption. Like a good lawyer, she addresses every single claim (that we know of) and refutes it, over and over again. She is very thorough and leaves no stone unturned, giving detailed examples of just how the DOJ promotes corruption. She proves it and does so over the course of something like 10 years. The Bad: She seems well-researched and knowledgeable but there is a conflict of interest with her position as defense of certain ENRON/ Merrill Lynch executives and what she is trying to prove. The main purpose of the book is to prove that corruption occurs within the DOJ and she does this by proving that prosecutors in cases she has worked have concealed Brady evidence from the defense. That is the premise. Where she begins to lose me is when she veers off that track and makes opinionated statements about the defendants in cases that aren't based on facts, but on her opinion. To me, it seems childish and really just adds clutter to the already wordy text. An example was when Senator Ted Stevens was on trial for bribery because a contractor didn't make him pay the full bill for renovations to his house. The cost of the renovations were estimated to be something like$165K by the defense and he had only been asked to pay half. Sidney remarks something like, "It didn't look like $165k of work to me!" Her personal opinion is completely irrelevant when it comes to details of the case like this, because her opinions or perceptions are not facts. She makes comments akin to this throughout the book that distract from the main point. On the whole, it would've been better if someone had written this book with a more objective viewpoint, though the only reason this book exists as it is is because if how intimately familiar she was with these cases. Also adding clutter is the incessant repition of facts. It made for a laborious read, however did add the purpose of reaffirming the point,, making sure the reader really comprehended it. Overall it was a good book, but the laborious nature of the text and some of the irrelevant comments that sounded like they came from a poor loser made me dock a star I otherwise would've given.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Luke Karten

    Prosecutorial misconduct is detailed in this book and unfortunately occurs more often than not. ‘What happened to the defendants in this book can happen to anyone....’ is not only exasperating but scary to see it played out in real life so often. This book made me angry much like the book ‘The Sun Does Shine’. Which is another example of prosecutorial abuse. Sidney Powell in great detail reveals how the Department of Justice has proved to be a political tool for those wanting to advance their ca Prosecutorial misconduct is detailed in this book and unfortunately occurs more often than not. ‘What happened to the defendants in this book can happen to anyone....’ is not only exasperating but scary to see it played out in real life so often. This book made me angry much like the book ‘The Sun Does Shine’. Which is another example of prosecutorial abuse. Sidney Powell in great detail reveals how the Department of Justice has proved to be a political tool for those wanting to advance their careers at the expense of innocent citizens.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I could not put this book down. Regardless what side of the aisle you side with I would strongly suggest reading this book. Very unnerving.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Thad Butterworth

    This book both fascinated and horrified me. I’m not usually into the details of the legal system, but the way that Sydney Powell lays out the massive corruption in the US Prosecutors Office kept me reading. It was one of the few books that I couldn’t put down until I had finished. Only read this book if you are willing to have your faith in the legal system completely demolished.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jock Mcclees

    Since I am dubious about Sidney Powell because of her claims of election fraud in the 2020 election, I started taking notes and doing some research even before I started the book. Following are my thoughts: I don’t know what she is going to say, but I do know that sometimes the law, at all levels, not just the Federal Department of Justice, is heavy handed, and people don’t have the funds to fight back. One example is the use of eminent domain. There are others I am blanking on that are awful. For Since I am dubious about Sidney Powell because of her claims of election fraud in the 2020 election, I started taking notes and doing some research even before I started the book. Following are my thoughts: I don’t know what she is going to say, but I do know that sometimes the law, at all levels, not just the Federal Department of Justice, is heavy handed, and people don’t have the funds to fight back. One example is the use of eminent domain. There are others I am blanking on that are awful. Forward – but it is by Alex Kozinski, not Powell – he was a former federal judge Mentions bad case against Ted Stevens – agree, it was atrocious Mentions case against Arthur Andersen involving Enron that ended the company – disagree – Supreme court put it back down to a lower court on a technicality claiming the jury instructions had been done improperly. Considering they had been found guilty, it is quite likely they would have been found guilty again with different jury instructions per some things I read. (update, I am now about a third of the way through. What the judges and prosecutors did does seem wrong.) He mentions and quotes the Center for Prosecutor Integrity – maybe a good group but I can’t find anything about it online, not even Wikipedia has anything about it. The part on the Brady rule seems reasonable Chapter 1 Ted Stevens Case – my research - had been brought by the Bush justice dept. – continued under Obama – Apparently it was rushed to court at the end of the Bush era from the little I have read, which led to errors and misconduct which may or may not have been related to the rush. Her claim that when Friedrich and Glavin got involved things started going south. This fits with the little I read. Chapter 2 – Enron It sounds about like what I remember. Nothing made me want to check on details. Chapter 3 – Arthur Andersen, Merrill Lynch p. 36 – I am confused. She says that she found it odd that Andersen had chosen this time to resuscitate its document retention policy but she had just been talking about how they had destroyed documents. Maybe it will become clear later. – Not good or bad, I just don’t follow. Update – later in the book they said that the document retention policy was that once a deal was finished, that they keep all the final documents but would destroy notes and drafts because these could be misused or misinterpreted. Before reading that, it seemed like it was obvious they were covering up. Considering this was covered later clearly, I am surprised it was sort of muddled here. Maybe I need to reread this now that I know more. p. 37 – first time a company had been indicted instead of people in the company involved. Interesting. She got hired to help with the Andersen defense so that might make her viewpoint biased. However, what she describes does sound like the prosecutors went way overboard. She talks about Andersen shredding documents but says legally it wasn’t required to keep them until they got a subpoena. Seems like one of those things that is strictly legal but perhaps not ethical. Yet a couple of paragraphs later she says that Andersen retained all relevant documents in either print or electronic form. So, it is not clear. The part about the jury instruction fits with what I read before starting reading about the Enron case. The Supreme Court threw it out based on the jury instruction not on any facts. ---- It has been a while since I added to this. Powell’s writing keeps you engaged but what she was describing, I had no way to check unless I basically wrote a book of my own. This book so far seems like she is settling scores with people she doesn’t like. Granted, based on what is in the book, it seems like they deserve it. It is also an advertising piece for her. She is not humble and touts all the great things she has done. Perhaps it bothers me a bit because she isn’t subtle and it feels like bragging. Also the I told you so’s that she called things right and another lawyer didn’t. Maybe it is a double standard on my part because she is a woman, but I don’t think so. I decided to try and find reviews by people who would seem to be knowledgeable on this. It was actually hard to find one. Most of the reviews were just rehashes of promotional material. Here is one. https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/whi... It also worried me that the book was written by someone with an obvious bias and not written by a reporter or historian who was looking at both sides and trying to find some truth in what happened. Powell may be absolutely right in what she says, but there is no way to tell from the book. The following is a review I found that expresses my concerns. I don’t know their expertise, but it doesn’t matter because the review doesn’t get into that sort of detail. Harold rated it it was ok Shelves: current-events, law This is a book about one of the Enron trials written by the losing (appelate) counsel complaining of the varioius infractions committed by the prosecutors. She is obviously a smart person and makes a good case. Repetitively. And she is outraged. Repetitively. The problem is that she is not a disinterested observer, and it is impossible to tell when, or if, the lawyering ends and the objective reporting begins. It probably doesn't. I have no reason to believe the prosecutors in the two cases she focuses on did not abuse their discretion and conceal evidence from the defendant, nor do I have any reason to believe the judge in the principial case wasn't totally and unthoughtfully in the hands of the prosecution. But I sure would like to hear from the other side, and I would like a reporter to investigate how rampant such behavior is. Should I worry that these cases are typical, and prosecutors in this country will sacrifice justice for an ill-gotten victory over an innocent man or is this just aberrational? Without a feel for that, this book is a lot less important to me than it is to her. Chapter 12 Judge Sullivan letting the prosecutors and Justice Dept have it for misconduct and hiding material they should have made available to the defense. P 210 – “Of course, Stevens’s defense team and every experienced criminal defense attorney also knew that the Justice Department would never do the same kind of investigation or reach the same conclusion as would a truly independent prosecutor. The department was way too political, incestuous, self-serving, and self-institutionalized to do so. Some lawyers opined that it really needed to be cleaned out from top to bottom with bleach and fire hoses. Too many people had been there too long. A select few merely moved in and out of the upper echelon of the department depending on the party in power. “Main Justice” as insiders called it, had descended to inbred arrogance and political abuse of poer, and the narcissists who wielded it produced disregard for the rule of law.” Hopefully Powell is wrong about that, but it is scary. It is why I would love to see a relatively neutral third party do an investigation/report on what is going on at Justice. There was plenty of obvious shenanigans under Bill Barr, who was an aberration and really corrupted Justice. But I would like to know the deal under a more normal Justice department. Chapter 19 Here and in several places in the book she mentions an email sent by Brown that was used to help convict him even though it was an email about a different transaction and she seemed to think it was very important. Yet, when she describes her argument before the 5th District Court of Appeals, she never brought it up. That seemed odd. So many things she described in detail, but she only devoted about a page to the decision where she lost the appeal that the chapter was about. Chapter 22 and Epilogue I agree that laws should be strengthened to discourage prosecutorial misconduct. I found it a little odd that at the end she complained that the Obama administration had promoted these people. What they did, mostly happened during the Bush administration and they got promoted there too. I think no matter what administration was in power they would likely have been promoted since until Trump, the Justice department was supposedly not very political. Especially with the rank and file parts of it. Final Thoughts The Schuelke report to Judge Emmet Sullivan about the prosecutorial misconduct in the Stevens case seems like the unbiased reporting I was looking for earlier. Since some of the same prosecutors were involved with the Merrill Lynch case, it would seem reasonable that some of the same things happened. Yet, Powell is obviously biased because she represented one of the defendants. Read the short review in the link I provided earlier for a good summary of the issues. Among other things, apparently, Powell cherry picked on some things regarding the ruling by the 5th District court of appeals. It can be hard to tell where facts end and her opinion begins. But what she says is nevertheless concerning. It seems that a few people were the major problem and not everyone at Justice. But, those people have gained influence which is worrying and the other question is how widespread are these problems? She also indicates that most judges don’t question and remain neutral enough. I am surprised that I could only find one review of the book that wasn’t just a rehash of the cover promotional material. I am not sure what that means. (I am not refering to Goodreads reviews, but reviews by third parties for magazines or newspapers who presumably have some training in the law and would be able to give a review not just based on opinion. Granted, some Goodreads reviewers do have expertise.)

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