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Powerful Patriots: Nationalist Protest in China's Foreign Relations

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What role do nationalism and popular protest play in China's foreign relations? Chinese authorities permitted anti-American demonstrations in 1999 but repressed them in 2001 during two crises in U.S.-China relations. Anti-Japanese protests were tolerated in 1985, 2005, and 2012 but banned in 1990 and 1996. Protests over Taiwan, the issue of greatest concern to Chinese nati What role do nationalism and popular protest play in China's foreign relations? Chinese authorities permitted anti-American demonstrations in 1999 but repressed them in 2001 during two crises in U.S.-China relations. Anti-Japanese protests were tolerated in 1985, 2005, and 2012 but banned in 1990 and 1996. Protests over Taiwan, the issue of greatest concern to Chinese nationalists, have never been allowed. To explain this variation, Powerful Patriots identifies the diplomatic as well as domestic factors that drive protest management in authoritarian states. Because nationalist protests are costly to repress and may turn against the government, allowing protests demonstrates resolve and makes compromise more costly in diplomatic relations. Repressing protests, by contrast, sends a credible signal of reassurance, facilitating diplomatic flexibility. Powerful Patriots traces China's management of dozens of nationalist protests and their consequences between 1985 and 2012.


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What role do nationalism and popular protest play in China's foreign relations? Chinese authorities permitted anti-American demonstrations in 1999 but repressed them in 2001 during two crises in U.S.-China relations. Anti-Japanese protests were tolerated in 1985, 2005, and 2012 but banned in 1990 and 1996. Protests over Taiwan, the issue of greatest concern to Chinese nati What role do nationalism and popular protest play in China's foreign relations? Chinese authorities permitted anti-American demonstrations in 1999 but repressed them in 2001 during two crises in U.S.-China relations. Anti-Japanese protests were tolerated in 1985, 2005, and 2012 but banned in 1990 and 1996. Protests over Taiwan, the issue of greatest concern to Chinese nationalists, have never been allowed. To explain this variation, Powerful Patriots identifies the diplomatic as well as domestic factors that drive protest management in authoritarian states. Because nationalist protests are costly to repress and may turn against the government, allowing protests demonstrates resolve and makes compromise more costly in diplomatic relations. Repressing protests, by contrast, sends a credible signal of reassurance, facilitating diplomatic flexibility. Powerful Patriots traces China's management of dozens of nationalist protests and their consequences between 1985 and 2012.

38 review for Powerful Patriots: Nationalist Protest in China's Foreign Relations

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Wong

    A good starting point for any university student who wish to write an essay on China 's nationalism A good starting point for any university student who wish to write an essay on China 's nationalism. recommend weisse's work in general.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I read this book on my Kindle Fire as a part of a graduate seminar. as far as I know, Powerful Patriots is essentially the author's dissertation, just in book format. overall, I enjoyed the book but found it mind-numbing and repetitive after chapter 5. most of the chapters follow the same line of thought and investigation which shows thorough work on the author's part -- her argument is solid. writing like so might be the new trend in political science but I couldn't help but moan in annoyance a I read this book on my Kindle Fire as a part of a graduate seminar. as far as I know, Powerful Patriots is essentially the author's dissertation, just in book format. overall, I enjoyed the book but found it mind-numbing and repetitive after chapter 5. most of the chapters follow the same line of thought and investigation which shows thorough work on the author's part -- her argument is solid. writing like so might be the new trend in political science but I couldn't help but moan in annoyance as every chapter seemed to say the same thing over and over again. everything here is about China's bilateral relationship with Japan -- not so much about where China stood in the international community at X time which is one of the weaknesses of the author's theory. but anyway, Weiss makes a well-fortified argument about how China handles domestic protests. basically, they can't. China is not good at not so much controlling anti-Japanese protests in particular but rather using them as a diplomatic tool to send messages to other states like Japan. later chapters illustrate how China's repression and allowance of protests perplexed Japan. the Japanese media didn't portray the protests correctly and in the case of the arrest of the 15-member crew of the 2010 Trawler Collision, Chinese control of anti-Japanese protests did not provoke the results China wanted. rather, Japan acted out of character by holding the 15-member crew for longer than expected and even proposing a domestic trial. another key component of this book is that anti-government or pro-democratic activists, whatever you want to call them, are using China's inability to effectively utilize protests to their advantage. Weiss specially notes Chinese activists like Ai Weiwei, Han Han and Michael-Anti criticizing the anti-Japanese protests for complaining about territorial disputes but yet not realizing that Chinese citizens don't even have a right to defend their our home. these kind of anti-government sentiments integrate themselves into the cracks of China's ability to manipulate protests -- kind of like weeds growing in the cracks of a sidewalk. the question is, will China be able to kill pro-democratic sidewalk weeds before they overtake the sidewalk? I liked this book but it left me with many lingering questions in my head. how might political literacy change protests in China? how would you even measure political literacy (similar to scientific literacy)? how does Japan tool their own domestic protests, especially since Japan is a different type of regime? are Sino-Japanese bilateral relations doomed in every aspect?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jonah

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  5. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Robinson

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michael

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    Florian

  8. 5 out of 5

    Aloe Yan

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sense Hofstede

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mika

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

  12. 4 out of 5

    Zach

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cathy Wu

  14. 4 out of 5

    Horst Walter

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chris

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    Brian

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alok

  19. 5 out of 5

    Levon

  20. 4 out of 5

    Fergus Ryan

  21. 4 out of 5

    Yee Ling

  22. 4 out of 5

    Claire

  23. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ty

  25. 4 out of 5

    Elspeth

  26. 5 out of 5

    !Tæmbuŝu

  27. 5 out of 5

    Henrik

  28. 4 out of 5

    Neeraj

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tete Bravo

  30. 4 out of 5

    Satwik Pradhan

  31. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

  32. 5 out of 5

    Hancartoon

  33. 5 out of 5

    David Yang

  34. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  35. 5 out of 5

    Kailin

  36. 5 out of 5

    Raceconstance

  37. 5 out of 5

    Luke Zhuo

  38. 5 out of 5

    Eric Kent

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