counter create hit Labor Immigration Under Capitalism: Asian Workers in the United States Before World War II - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Labor Immigration Under Capitalism: Asian Workers in the United States Before World War II

Availability: Ready to download


Compare
Ads Banner

25 review for Labor Immigration Under Capitalism: Asian Workers in the United States Before World War II

  1. 5 out of 5

    sdw

    This book begins with a Marxist theory of labor migration under capitalism. This theory is then applied to Asian Americans through a series of essays. The book is divided into three parts. The first part applies this theory to understand the conditions in the United States that shape the recruitment and immigration laws etc of the immigrants’ arrival and labor conditions. The second part applies the theory to understand conditions in the originating countries of Asian immigration. The third part This book begins with a Marxist theory of labor migration under capitalism. This theory is then applied to Asian Americans through a series of essays. The book is divided into three parts. The first part applies this theory to understand the conditions in the United States that shape the recruitment and immigration laws etc of the immigrants’ arrival and labor conditions. The second part applies the theory to understand conditions in the originating countries of Asian immigration. The third part looks at the experiences of the workers themselves. The book looks at five key groups of Asian immigrant laborers: Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Indian and Filipino. Several of the essays do not add anything particularly new to the scholarship but adeptly demonstrate the applicability of this theoretical lens (which I largely agree with, although world systems theory in general lacks the historical specificity and attention to context I really love). A couple of the essays were real gems, in my opinion. I loved the essay on Japanese gardeners in Southern California. It really told an important story that needed to be told. The book predominately focuses on immigration to Hawaii and California. It also focuses almost entirely on turn-of-the-century immigration. Anyway, I think the introduction is worth reading, and isn’t as perfunctory as some introductions are. And each section actually has a real nice mini-introduction that speaks to some of the key themes across the immigrant groups. The essays don’t really talk about inter-ethnic relations either among Asian immigrants or with other minority or immigrant populations. There was a lot of attention to class dynamics within each Asian immigrant population. Gender is addressed through two specific articles on women’s experiences, but is not integrated into the study or analysis as a whole (other than this vague idea that men were recruited because men were the laborers, leading to immigrant populations without women – there were a lot of other dynamics to the recruitment of mostly men and the exclusion of Asian women). I did really appreciate the attention to the way capitalism reach shaped the conditions in countries like Japan and China and of course the U.S. imperial relationship to the Philippines that contributed to the labor migration. On a funny side note, the introduction explains that the sociologists who edited the book failed to get the historians who were contributing to switch their citation style, thus there is no consistent citation style in this interdisciplinary book, as everyone just used the citation style they were most familiar with/comfortable with. What I learned: The Wheatland Riots (1913) which the IWW were involved with included some Indian participants.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ani

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  5. 4 out of 5

    Eromsted

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Madrid

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mario

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ana

  9. 5 out of 5

    Marie Hew

  10. 4 out of 5

    Victor

  11. 4 out of 5

    Byron

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kishore

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bryn Greenwood

  14. 4 out of 5

    Yuhe Faye

  15. 4 out of 5

    Steven Chang

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kavya

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gazmend Kryeziu

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  19. 4 out of 5

    Victor

  20. 5 out of 5

    McPhaul M.

  21. 5 out of 5

    The Ninja Squirrel

  22. 5 out of 5

    PKN4 GoodReads

  23. 4 out of 5

    QQ

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  25. 5 out of 5

    Krzysiek (Chris)

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.