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Collecting Children of the Atom #1-6 & X-Men Vol 1 #1


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Collecting Children of the Atom #1-6 & X-Men Vol 1 #1

30 review for The X-Men

  1. 5 out of 5

    Juraj Búry

    Premiéra - prvá polovica knihy - je reinterpretovaný origin tímu. Kresba pekná, aj by to nebola nuda, ale je to len ukážka, bez záveru. Teda strata času a emočného zapojenia. 2 * Boh miluje, človek zabíja - druhá polovica knihy - je hlavný ťahák. Podarená marvelácka grafická novela, ktorá možno predbehla aj Moora. Realistická kresba (okey, okienka si občas robia čo chcú) a kultový príbeh, ktorý inšpiroval X2. Príjemné čítanie. 4* Priemer: priemerné, 3*

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    Marvel's Mightiest Heroes Book 17. In 'Children of the Atom' we see a world where mutants are just beginning to emerge into the public consciousness. As fear and hatred for the mutants grows, Professor Charles Xavier attempts to recruit a number of vulnerable young people to attend his new academy. The second story here is the first-ever appearance of the X-Men and sees the team of mutant teens joined by their newest member, Marvel Girl, take on Magneto for the first time. I wasn't really getting Marvel's Mightiest Heroes Book 17. In 'Children of the Atom' we see a world where mutants are just beginning to emerge into the public consciousness. As fear and hatred for the mutants grows, Professor Charles Xavier attempts to recruit a number of vulnerable young people to attend his new academy. The second story here is the first-ever appearance of the X-Men and sees the team of mutant teens joined by their newest member, Marvel Girl, take on Magneto for the first time. I wasn't really getting into this book to begin with. The set-up of the growing hatred towards mutants and the various scenes which were clearly allegories for things like race relations, anti-semitism and homophobia all felt pretty obvious to me. Mutants have been used allegorically in Marvel almost since their beginning so to have it all rehashed felt unnecessary. Put simply, these themes had already been done better before (see Chris Claremont's iconic run, for example). However, toward the tail-end of the first story it started to come together for me a bit more because it explores how Professor X's original plan to merely create a defensive mutant militia is diverted by his relationships with the actual students, eventually changing their remit to be one of proactively helping the world instead of merely protecting against it. Narratively, the last scene of 1999's 'Children of the Atom' flows perfectly into the first scene of 1963's 'X-Men', but the connection doesn't go much further than that. Like so many stories from the 60s, Lee's original X-Men adventure has some very dated moments, not least the horrible way that all of the male X-Men immediately sexually objectify Jean Grey when she arrives at the school. Even Xavier, who is her teacher don't forget, refers to her for the first time as 'a most attractive young lady'. The story becomes much less uncomfortable, however, when the X-Men actually go into action against Magneto. The iconic villain was the best element of this story, appearing on the page pretty much fully-formed as he would be for decades to come. * More reviews here: https://fsfh-book-review2.webnode.com/ *

  3. 5 out of 5

    Graham van der Made

    The X-Men are as iconic to Marvel Comics as The Avengers or Spider-Man. However, they differ from other heroes in that they are mutants – another step in human evolution. This puts the X-Men (and other mutants alike) in danger from those opposing change and what they represent. This graphic novel includes the original origin of The X-Men and a modernised version of it. The X-Men debuted in 1963 in the pages of The X-Men #1. The team consisted of Angel, Cyclops, Marvel Girl, Beast, and Iceman. Thi The X-Men are as iconic to Marvel Comics as The Avengers or Spider-Man. However, they differ from other heroes in that they are mutants – another step in human evolution. This puts the X-Men (and other mutants alike) in danger from those opposing change and what they represent. This graphic novel includes the original origin of The X-Men and a modernised version of it. The X-Men debuted in 1963 in the pages of The X-Men #1. The team consisted of Angel, Cyclops, Marvel Girl, Beast, and Iceman. This story begins with the male members during training. They’re disturbed when the latest addition, Jean Grey (Marvel Girl) arrives at Professor Xavier’s mansion to join this elite mutant team. After a brief conversation with Professor X, Jean is introduced to the rest of the team who lusts over her (yes, you read that right). Meanwhile, Magneto has started a destructive rampage. Finding out, Professor X sends the new team to defeat his adversary, which they do. In hindsight, it’s pretty dangerous to send a team of teenagers to battle the greatest foe they’ll ever know, but sometimes you have to follow the orders of a crippled telepath. I guess? The story is plagued with the cons of comics at the time. There are too many words per panel, the dialogue is clumsy, and women aren’t really equal to men. If anything it’s just a nice issue to have. Thankfully the next story in this X-Men graphic novel, Children of the Atom #1-6 shows how comic book storytelling has progressed over the years. It’s another retelling of the X-Men’s origin, but this time it’s spread out over the six issues. Not only do we get a look at how each of the team members joined the team, but their struggles, problems with acceptance, and those around them fearing the unknown. Unlike the original origin story, they don’t face off against Magneto, but rather an anti-mutant movement leader by the name of William Metzger. This is the real stand-out story in the book and one for this graphic novel series as well. The artwork is simplistic and well shaded, all of the dialogue feels natural, and it’s just a superbly paced story. I highly recommend this book for any comic book fans and those wanting to know more about The X-Men’s origins.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sarah-Jayne Briggs

    (This review may contain spoilers). Although it was interesting to read two different versions of the X-Men origin story, I have to say, I didn't really like this comic book as much as some of the others. Out of the two different sets of comics, I actually preferred the origin story in the first one. It was good to have the opportunity to see some of the background of the original five X-Men. I had a lot of sympathy for Scott in the first set of comics. I thought he looked far too thin... like he' (This review may contain spoilers). Although it was interesting to read two different versions of the X-Men origin story, I have to say, I didn't really like this comic book as much as some of the others. Out of the two different sets of comics, I actually preferred the origin story in the first one. It was good to have the opportunity to see some of the background of the original five X-Men. I had a lot of sympathy for Scott in the first set of comics. I thought he looked far too thin... like he'd been starved by the man who had taken him. I really liked Bobby's character in this... but I think I preferred Hank's a lot more. There wasn't really much evidence of how intelligent he was until he was picked up by Xavier, though. It would have been nice to see something of that as well as how athletic he is. I did think interspersing the story with details of the newscasts was an interesting effect. I did also find myself getting really annoyed with the people in the first set of comics especially. There wasn't much evidence of anyone being accepting... though it was good to see that some of the parents tried hard to support their children. I thought it was interesting to see that the first set of comics were in a different kind of style entirely to the slightly more juvenile version of the second set. What I also thought was interesting was how young Charles and Magneto seemed in the first set of comics. And I liked seeing the mutual understanding between Charles and the FBI agent... and I did like the FBI agent's character. I did dislike most of the other police shown, though. There was one mutant character I felt a lot of sympathy for in the first set of comics. It was a bit disappointing that the second comic meant that the first one was no longer valid, though. I liked Warner's character, even though he was technically a vigilante. I would have liked to know more about him... though he did remind me a bit of Tony's character. I liked seeing some of the artwork at the end of the book and I do think it was worth reading these comics... I just didn't enjoy them as much as some of the others.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lucas Guedes

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nick Atkins

  7. 4 out of 5

    André

  8. 4 out of 5

    Trish

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carol Ballan

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tomáš Kocián

  11. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  12. 4 out of 5

    J A SPONG

  13. 5 out of 5

    Frida007

  14. 5 out of 5

    Verybigdreamer

  15. 4 out of 5

    adercino orçay

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Urbančíková

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lewis Oliveras

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lee Gannon

  20. 4 out of 5

    Simone Kniphoff Dos Santos

  21. 5 out of 5

    Pete

  22. 5 out of 5

    DeathRitch

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mary-Jane

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kane

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lara Adhmann

  26. 5 out of 5

    Martin

  27. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marcelo Cecilio

  29. 5 out of 5

    James Taylor

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lida

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