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Interrupted: When Jesus Wrecks Your Comfortable Christianity

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Interrupted follows the author’s messy journey through life and church and into living on mission. Snatching Jen from the grip of her consumer life, God began asking her questions like, “What is really the point of My Church? What have I really asked of you?” She was far too busy doing church than being church, even as a pastor’s wife, an author of five Christian books, an Interrupted follows the author’s messy journey through life and church and into living on mission. Snatching Jen from the grip of her consumer life, God began asking her questions like, “What is really the point of My Church? What have I really asked of you?” She was far too busy doing church than being church, even as a pastor’s wife, an author of five Christian books, and a committed believer for 26 years. She discovered she had missed the point. Christ brought Jen and her family to a place of living on mission by asking them tough questions, leading them through Scripture, and walking together with them on the path. Interrupted invites readers to take a similar journey.


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Interrupted follows the author’s messy journey through life and church and into living on mission. Snatching Jen from the grip of her consumer life, God began asking her questions like, “What is really the point of My Church? What have I really asked of you?” She was far too busy doing church than being church, even as a pastor’s wife, an author of five Christian books, an Interrupted follows the author’s messy journey through life and church and into living on mission. Snatching Jen from the grip of her consumer life, God began asking her questions like, “What is really the point of My Church? What have I really asked of you?” She was far too busy doing church than being church, even as a pastor’s wife, an author of five Christian books, and a committed believer for 26 years. She discovered she had missed the point. Christ brought Jen and her family to a place of living on mission by asking them tough questions, leading them through Scripture, and walking together with them on the path. Interrupted invites readers to take a similar journey.

30 review for Interrupted: When Jesus Wrecks Your Comfortable Christianity

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michaiah

    Not that impressed. The last chapter was the best (although it got a little repetitive) - I absolutely agree that Christians must learn to reach their particular culture and become all things to all people. I also agree that American Christians (including myself) are way too consumeristic and really not that different from anyone else. We all need to cut back and truly start serving others. But not to the exclusion of the gospel. I don't think the author was necessarily advocating this, she ju Not that impressed. The last chapter was the best (although it got a little repetitive) - I absolutely agree that Christians must learn to reach their particular culture and become all things to all people. I also agree that American Christians (including myself) are way too consumeristic and really not that different from anyone else. We all need to cut back and truly start serving others. But not to the exclusion of the gospel. I don't think the author was necessarily advocating this, she just assumed it (the gospel) and I've learned that the gospel is too precious to ever be assumed. I also found it interesting that she spent the majority of the book talking about how we need to cut back, and then told this story about the fantastic Alaskan cruise she and her husband recently took. What? And I found it disturbing that, in that same story, she recounted (as if it was no big deal) how a friend (also a Christian) who was on the cruise with them, told this ridiculous lie so her husband could go zip lining. Again, what? The author is funny, I'll give her that, but in a way that got irritating after a while. She was like "I'm hilarious and I know it" when really, she's not quite as hilarious as she thinks she is. Also, I found her sarcasm annoying, and at times borderline blasphemous. I wouldn't recommend this to anyone.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Philip

    I'll bump this up to 5 stars if it proves to be transformational. (Well, that's in regard to the long-term effects on my life - not the book itself. If the book itself starts transforming into something else, I think we're in for it...) Liz suggested this to me. Maybe I should be worried about reading a Jen Hatmaker book. I mean, next thing you know I'll have a Pinterest account, and be one of the thousands to "like" her facebook post within the first 45 seconds of her posting it. It probably als I'll bump this up to 5 stars if it proves to be transformational. (Well, that's in regard to the long-term effects on my life - not the book itself. If the book itself starts transforming into something else, I think we're in for it...) Liz suggested this to me. Maybe I should be worried about reading a Jen Hatmaker book. I mean, next thing you know I'll have a Pinterest account, and be one of the thousands to "like" her facebook post within the first 45 seconds of her posting it. It probably also doesn't help that I have a mimosa in my hand right now. Delicious. Hatmaker and I share some similarities regarding our upbringing. Most notably, we both went to fairly restrictive Baptist Colleges - which colored the way we view the faith. She does have the additional baggage (baggage?... I don't think this is necessarily a bad thing - sorry to the parents of Jen Hatmaker, I know the word baggage has a lot of negative connotations...) of being a pastor's kid, and married to a pastor. (...Also, apologies to Mr. Brandon Hatmaker...) So, I took much of her book as a reaction against legalism of her upbringing - and I mean that in a good way. The problems Hatmaker addresses are ones that most all Christians face at one point or another. One can always "do more." The answer to "Do you read your Bible enough?" or "Do you pray enough?" is inevitably going to be no. Especially since "enough" is a jarringly subjective term. But we can read the Bible tons, and pray tons, and still come away from the faith feeling empty if we are not serving those around us. Of course, then too - how much is enough? I mean, if I wanted to be perfect, I'd sell all I had and then give all the money to the poor. But I'm not perfect - and I won't make that a goal, because MY belief is goals should be attainable. So... yeah... ...Is this me justifying disobedience? Not inheriting the kingdom? And is perfect the requirement? I'd argue that Christ cleared that mess up. Which still leaves us working hard and feeling under-fed. Hatmaker's book (and church) is a call to service, but not a legalistic service earning a salvation. It rails against legalism, and instead preaches love through action. P.S. Hatmaker(s) if you're reading this - I'm glad you're not too hard on the legalists. It's so easy to fall into the trap of judging the judgey. Well done avoiding that (for the most part.) I raise my mimosa to you. Original review: January 2014. Bumped up to 5 stars August 2014.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lana Meredith

    Having loved 7 so much I bought and placed it into the hands of dear friends and family, I can not express how disappointed I was by Interrupted. Jen is one of my favorite authors. She makes me laugh and cry, convicts and comforts. But there are serious flaws in this book. The premise is excellent, and the story of their church development interesting, but her tone throughout this work came across far more sermonic and condescending than 7. Not to mention her interpretation of some key scripture Having loved 7 so much I bought and placed it into the hands of dear friends and family, I can not express how disappointed I was by Interrupted. Jen is one of my favorite authors. She makes me laugh and cry, convicts and comforts. But there are serious flaws in this book. The premise is excellent, and the story of their church development interesting, but her tone throughout this work came across far more sermonic and condescending than 7. Not to mention her interpretation of some key scriptures are at best incomplete. Which wouldn't be such a big deal if the whole second half were not based on these two chapters - just two - instead of the whole counsel of Scripture. The first third of the book I would give five stars - waking us up to the need for a missional church, to be the salt and light Matthew calls us to, to help the poor and needy and not just better ourselves, but the last parts were so disappointing - not in message, but in methodology - I could only close it with a two-star feeling. I will read and re-read 7 and will heartily recommend her writing to anyone who asks, but I have serious reservations about Interrupted, despite the overwhelming awesomeness of its core message - and the church movement it was written about.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Drake

    I didn't know what to expect when I began reading Interrupted. I was hoping it would be a call to Christians to care for the poor and that the call would be grounded in the gospel and the Word of God. Unfortunately, the gospel is almost entirely absent from this volume, and the authority and necessity of Scripture is downplayed throughout. While the book is very readable and insightful at times, it suffers from being extremely imbalanced in its presentation of the church’s mission, placing nearl I didn't know what to expect when I began reading Interrupted. I was hoping it would be a call to Christians to care for the poor and that the call would be grounded in the gospel and the Word of God. Unfortunately, the gospel is almost entirely absent from this volume, and the authority and necessity of Scripture is downplayed throughout. While the book is very readable and insightful at times, it suffers from being extremely imbalanced in its presentation of the church’s mission, placing nearly all of its emphasis on meeting people’s physical needs while devaluing the role of sharing the gospel and the Word of God with others. Though the author makes some helpful comments regarding the need to combat poverty and minister to people in their individual contexts, her narrow definition of the Church’s mission as simply meeting people’s physical needs and her downplaying of the role of the Word of God in public ministry largely overshadows the more positive elements of the work. I would highly recommend reading works like Radical by David Platt or Onward by Russell Moore, both of which are grounded in a gospel-focused, biblical mindset on how to minister to people in the world. But you are probably better off passing on Hatmaker's book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Abby Vaughn

    By far one of the best books I've read! "This is my high calling: to live on mission as an adopted daughter of Jesus. If people around me aren’t moved by my Christ or my church, then I must be doing a miserable job of representing them both."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lissa

    The modern church goer certainly needs to read this! We have diluted ourselves with our grandparents' religious practices. While there are Christian principles & devotion to God's Word we must continue, I find a true meshing of "true religion", from James 2, and Christ's true gospel message seriously lacking in "church". I found some of Mrs. Hatmaker's statements almost like an 'Eureka!' moment, because she verbalized certain truths that I've never quite found words for. For instance, why do we The modern church goer certainly needs to read this! We have diluted ourselves with our grandparents' religious practices. While there are Christian principles & devotion to God's Word we must continue, I find a true meshing of "true religion", from James 2, and Christ's true gospel message seriously lacking in "church". I found some of Mrs. Hatmaker's statements almost like an 'Eureka!' moment, because she verbalized certain truths that I've never quite found words for. For instance, why do we 'go to church' to get preached at? or why aren't we actively feeding the poor or engaged in some practical ministry, showing the lowly 'the church', instead of amassing hours in the pew? I don't agree that church is for us. Jen's perspective is fresh, true and invigorating. I appreciate that her 'wake up' call is not for us to jump on her band wagon, but Christ's. She doesn't want us all to swarm New Austin Church to taste the Kool-aid there, but get a vision, to listen more clearly to Jesus calling His bride to wash her gown, prepare by living like He did and make a real difference where we love in His Name, for His glory, not our own, or the church's.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    This book is Jen Hatmaker's journey from 'normal' Christianity to Christianity that emulates Christ and serves the poor (marginalized). She describes the journey in 5 phases: Phase 1: Breaking Down - Value: Growing in understanding of God's Word - Key Scripture: John 21:15-23 Phase 2: The Horror of Actually Changing - Value: The greatest command is to love God and love others. - Key Scripture: Luke 22:14-27 Phase 3: Getting Out There - Value: Serving others selflessly and sacrificially - Key Scripture: M This book is Jen Hatmaker's journey from 'normal' Christianity to Christianity that emulates Christ and serves the poor (marginalized). She describes the journey in 5 phases: Phase 1: Breaking Down - Value: Growing in understanding of God's Word - Key Scripture: John 21:15-23 Phase 2: The Horror of Actually Changing - Value: The greatest command is to love God and love others. - Key Scripture: Luke 22:14-27 Phase 3: Getting Out There - Value: Serving others selflessly and sacrificially - Key Scripture: Matthew 25 Phase 4: Finding Your Tribe - Value: Partnering with others to make a difference in our community and world - Key Scripture: Isaiah 58 Phase 5: Sent - Value: Building genuine relationships with God and each other Key Scripture: 1 Corinthians 9:19-23 Each section had a list of books/scripture that influenced them along the various phases of the journey. Two which really stood out: Simplicity by Richard Rohr, The Tangible Kingdom by Hugh Halter and Matt Smay.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nirupa Mathew

    This was a great book! Although the content was heavy and intense, her casual writing style and humor had me laughing at different moments and made for an easy read. I love their church model, their passion for serving from a gospel mentality, and how missional they are including their small group model. This is the first book I have read by her, but I think her authenticity is so refreshing. Her husband writes some chapters in between from his perspective, and I loved seeing how God worked out This was a great book! Although the content was heavy and intense, her casual writing style and humor had me laughing at different moments and made for an easy read. I love their church model, their passion for serving from a gospel mentality, and how missional they are including their small group model. This is the first book I have read by her, but I think her authenticity is so refreshing. Her husband writes some chapters in between from his perspective, and I loved seeing how God worked out his calling in their lives from both perspectives. She's very clear that there is no formula to this, but I loved her ideas and stories and it brought me to a place of deep repentance and made me really flush out my own purpose and mission.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Christian Living. I read one other book by this author and loved it. So I picked up another one. I like her use of scripture in presenting her message. This one annoyed me a little, but I can still give it 4 stars because of the overall message. She made many generalizations here and she assumed her reader had the exact same thought as she had. Some readers might, but I'm not one of those. This one felt more geared to those seeking religion and doing charitable acts of kindness....maybe less so Christian Living. I read one other book by this author and loved it. So I picked up another one. I like her use of scripture in presenting her message. This one annoyed me a little, but I can still give it 4 stars because of the overall message. She made many generalizations here and she assumed her reader had the exact same thought as she had. Some readers might, but I'm not one of those. This one felt more geared to those seeking religion and doing charitable acts of kindness....maybe less so for those who already have that in their life. Plenty of food for thought though.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Barb Nelson

    I'm waffling between giving this book three stars and four stars. The good: I loved reading the story of how she "woke up" from same kind of Evangelicalism in which I was raised and from which I, too, have woken up. There were a few chapters that were so dead on for where I am in my own spiritual journey that I wanted to cheer. I love her vision of what the church could/should be, and her enthusiasm for that vision. I enjoyed the interaction between what was going on in her life, and the occasio I'm waffling between giving this book three stars and four stars. The good: I loved reading the story of how she "woke up" from same kind of Evangelicalism in which I was raised and from which I, too, have woken up. There were a few chapters that were so dead on for where I am in my own spiritual journey that I wanted to cheer. I love her vision of what the church could/should be, and her enthusiasm for that vision. I enjoyed the interaction between what was going on in her life, and the occasional chapters written by her husband about what was going on in his. And sometimes she is pretty funny. The not-so-good: Sometimes the humor doesn't work, and the brittleness of the missed humor edges it over into sounding smug and even a bit arrogant. I got the impression that if I ever met her, she wouldn't think I was nearly cool enough to be her friend. And sometimes I felt she was trying to motivate change more out of guilt than out of true sense of transformation through love--sort of banging the reader over the head with THIS IS HOW THE CHURCH OUGHT TO BE, rather than motivating us to give out of the overflowing grace and love we have received. But I don't want to end with the not-so-good because in spite of it, I still found myself moved and inspired by this book. It's well worth reading, and since I have an enormous chip on my shoulder about all things evangelical, that's a little scary for me to say. But even though I'm sure she and I would disagree on many minor points of theology (and also probably about which things are major and which things are minor), her call to action for the church is timely and motivating. (edited to add: I knew nothing about the author (Jen Hatmaker) before I read this book. After doing a little digging around, I'm less enamored of her than I was after just reading this one book. I'd still recommend the book but just take it with a grain of salt, I guess.)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Katie M. Reid

    A feeling of irritation over potential inconveniences to my American Christian middle-class life was present as I read this book. On one hand I was excited to be stretched and on the other I was mad that I needed to change...now that I had been faced with some inconvenient truths. "Transformation began with humility, even humiliation. It started with conviction and discipline. It increased through loss, not gain. It grew through global exposure and uncomfortable questions. It was born out of reje A feeling of irritation over potential inconveniences to my American Christian middle-class life was present as I read this book. On one hand I was excited to be stretched and on the other I was mad that I needed to change...now that I had been faced with some inconvenient truths. "Transformation began with humility, even humiliation. It started with conviction and discipline. It increased through loss, not gain. It grew through global exposure and uncomfortable questions. It was born out of rejection, replanted in new soil. It was not found in my Christian subculture but in the eyes of my neighbors, the needs of my city, the cries of the nations. It was through subtraction, not addition, that transformation engulfed me, and I'll tell you something. I am not the same" (pg 233). Jen talks about climbing down the ladder, not up it, to join the least, loving them by going where they are, not expecting them to come to us or to our church. "If you begin to value a lower life, you will be misinterpreted and likely criticized. Most people don't want American staples like comfort, safety and prosperity challenged" (Interrupted, pg. 142). Interrupted is a story about God transforming a couple in Texas so that they can love the least. It is also a challenging guide for us to ask hard questions, get our hands dirty and give beyond what we feel capable.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Misti

    I like Jen Hatmaker. She is a thinker, a ponderer, a dig into the Bible gal.She puts action to what she is learning, and I love that about her! This woman makes me think. She is the type of person who I would want to be my friend. She would push me outside of my comfort zone and closer to Christ as the goal. I wrote a huge review of my thoughts yesterday on this book, only to be completely distressed this morning when I saw that they didn't post and I don't have a back up copy. After reflecting if I like Jen Hatmaker. She is a thinker, a ponderer, a dig into the Bible gal.She puts action to what she is learning, and I love that about her! This woman makes me think. She is the type of person who I would want to be my friend. She would push me outside of my comfort zone and closer to Christ as the goal. I wrote a huge review of my thoughts yesterday on this book, only to be completely distressed this morning when I saw that they didn't post and I don't have a back up copy. After reflecting if I should re-write the review I decided against it. The process of writing it out yesterday solidified for me what I needed to take away from INTERRUPTED. Truly it is summed up in this statement from Jen's husband, "In all our efforts, if we are not about people, our labors aren't really about Jesus but about us." Amen

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kris Patrick

    Girlfriend goes after Joel Osteen. I like her! Hatmaker is a gifted, shall I say by God?, writer. I especially enjoyed her list of Heavy Influences at the end of each Phase (or collection of chapters). A little Scripture-y at times, but hey, what should I have expected. She is a leader of a church. "There is a marked difference between criticizing consumerism and actually resisting consumerism." So the irony is that I read Interrupted while my husband read O'Reilly's Killing Reagan in an another Girlfriend goes after Joel Osteen. I like her! Hatmaker is a gifted, shall I say by God?, writer. I especially enjoyed her list of Heavy Influences at the end of each Phase (or collection of chapters). A little Scripture-y at times, but hey, what should I have expected. She is a leader of a church. "There is a marked difference between criticizing consumerism and actually resisting consumerism." So the irony is that I read Interrupted while my husband read O'Reilly's Killing Reagan in an another chair across the room. Reagan is fine, I just don't regard him with the same idolatry as my neighbors do. Probably shouldn't have written that. If no one hears from me in a couple days, the Carmel Police or Fishers Police may have come to seize my Hamilton County residency card and haul me away.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Anjanette Barr

    I really enjoyed her conversational tone and sarcasm/wit, though I imagine it would be distracting for some. I'm pretty sure Jen Hatmaker and I would be good friends. :) The whole book was challenging and refreshing. I was blessed with a mentor (my pastor) who lived his faith out like the Hatmaker's are attempting, and his love (and others') is what drew me into faith. Jen gives plenty of practical examples of how they have handled their calling, while making sure to emphasize seeking where God I really enjoyed her conversational tone and sarcasm/wit, though I imagine it would be distracting for some. I'm pretty sure Jen Hatmaker and I would be good friends. :) The whole book was challenging and refreshing. I was blessed with a mentor (my pastor) who lived his faith out like the Hatmaker's are attempting, and his love (and others') is what drew me into faith. Jen gives plenty of practical examples of how they have handled their calling, while making sure to emphasize seeking where God has put each of us individually - rather than using the book as a how-to. I will be thinking about how this applies to my life for some time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    A wonderful read that not only shows behind the curtain to the birth of Austin New Church (Brandon Hatmaker | Barefoot Church) from Jen's perspective, Interrupted is a spirit stirring read that hooks you at the start and doesn't let go. One moment you're laughing uncontrollably, the next you're weeping with challenge and conviction. Interrupted is a highly recommended read, but be warned, you won't be the same by the end of the book. Jen will challenge not only your thinking, but your entire way A wonderful read that not only shows behind the curtain to the birth of Austin New Church (Brandon Hatmaker | Barefoot Church) from Jen's perspective, Interrupted is a spirit stirring read that hooks you at the start and doesn't let go. One moment you're laughing uncontrollably, the next you're weeping with challenge and conviction. Interrupted is a highly recommended read, but be warned, you won't be the same by the end of the book. Jen will challenge not only your thinking, but your entire way of living.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    "When Jesus' followers asked what to do about the weeds in the harvest field, He said to treat them the same as the wheat, 'because while you are pulling the weeds, you may uproot the wheat with them' (Matthew 13:29). There was one Judas, but eleven disciples who were forever transformed by Jesus' broken body. The risk of encountering a few weeds is not sufficient reason to avoid the whole field of human suffering, because I assure you, identifying with the wheat but not the weeds is a gross ove "When Jesus' followers asked what to do about the weeds in the harvest field, He said to treat them the same as the wheat, 'because while you are pulling the weeds, you may uproot the wheat with them' (Matthew 13:29). There was one Judas, but eleven disciples who were forever transformed by Jesus' broken body. The risk of encountering a few weeds is not sufficient reason to avoid the whole field of human suffering, because I assure you, identifying with the wheat but not the weeds is a gross overestimation of our own station. The correct character to identify with here is the weed shown mercy, not the Savior capable of discerning the human heart." (63) **** "I worry sometimes that it is impossible for me to truly identify with Christ since I am at the top of the global food chain: white, American, educated, affluent, healthy, Texan (wink). I'm at the apex on the pyramid scheme, already enjoying every benefit and advantage everyone else is laboring for. The rest of the world struggles with hunger and sickness, but we have to conquer the diseases of greed and ego, which are notoriously harder to cure. When Jesus said, 'It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the kingdom of God' (Matthew 19:24), I now understand that's me. And you. The higher we are, the harder it is to adopt the heart of Christ. I suppose that's why Americans are the richest people on the planet but plagued with depression, suicide, and loneliness. We're furthest from the freedom that exists only at the bottom, and money can't buy that liberation." (78) **** "Having Jesus as Judge, like we see in Matthew 25, is something akin to having your Grana double as your principal. No one loves me more than Jesus. No one is more on my side. No one is more obsessed with His sons and daughters. No one else laid down His life to defend me. It's walking into court and finding out your best friend is hearing the case. If Jesus as Judge used to scare me, now it comforts me because 'there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus' (Romans 8:1). The Judge also goes by the name Friend. His justice is constructed on mercy, and I'll never stand before a Judge more determined to bring about my liberation." (100) **** "As for me, I'm going to gamble on the fact that Jesus didn't have much patience with believers who attempted to limit the scope of ' who my neighbor is' to the fewest possible people (see Luke 10:25-37). Jesus always colored outside of the lines here, extending grace and healing to those well beyond His people group. He often healed people first; they believed second. If I'm wrong, the worst thing that could happen is that some desperate people are cared for, and I'm guessing Jesus will look the other way. He seems to favor unmerited grace. To me, this is a wheat-and-weeds issue, and since that's not my call to make, I'll just err on the side of mercy and let Jesus sort it out at the harvest." (107) **** [Matthew 25:41-45] "Never once did Jesus charge them with something they did wrong. His entire indictment was on what they didn't do right. It was a sin of neglect, a crime of omission. And it went far beyond ignoring poverty. Jesus explained that when we ignore the least, we ignore Him. No amount of spinning or clever justification can neutralize Jesus' point. If we claim affinity for Christ but turn a blind eye to those He identified Himself with, there is no honor in that. There is no truth in it." (126-7) **** "Believer, your life is too essential to waste on pettiness or word wars, green or ladder climbing, anger or bitterness, fear or anxiety, regret or disappointment. Life is too short. We must run, not walk, the way of Isaiah 58, embracing authentic faith manifested through mercy and community. Living on mission requires nothing less. It is a grand adventure, a true voyage into the kingdom of God. Would you lose days, months, years pointing fingers and quarreling, or would you rather break yokes of oppression? Imagine what would happen if we all chose the latter. "Our light would rise in the darkness, indeed." (182) **** "When a Christian consistently treats someone with compassion or demonstrates integrity at work, the gospel wins a hearing. We can continue to invite unbelievers to church, but we must first invite them into our lives. Have them over, go to dinner, welcome them in. Create a safe place for them to belong without agenda; they needn't worry about following our Christian rules yet (or pretending to in front of us). We must become their advocates, embracing them as dear friends so they might one day feel comfortable belonging with us. This is not a strategy for rapid church growth, but the patient hard work of love is the way of Christ. It is the subversive path into the kingdom." (205) **** "Love has won infinitely more converts than theology. The first believers were drawn to Christ's mercy long before they understood His divinity." (206) **** "As we engage a broken world, standing stubbornly on principle or privilege indicates an immature heart that prefers to be right rather than seek the redemption of his neighbor. When we lead with doctrine before love, we brutalize the spirit of the doctrine we're prioritizing. Insisting that unbelievers or disoriented believers defer to our convictions is the quickest way to repel them from God. Even if our posture isn't arrogant, broadcasting our extreme Christian principles without sensitivity makes us seem so weird that we'll lose credibility anyway." (211)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anne Bogel

    This prequel to 7 (which I loved) had some interesting insights, but it doesn't have the zing of her latest. I think Interrupted was a victim of my high expectations.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Lewton

    Jen’s writing is mostly light and entertaining and engaging. I would not recommend listening to this book because I think the way the narrator reads it takes away from the fun flippancy of her style. I suspect I would have enjoyed it more in actual book form. I’m looking forward to reading “7” because I think I was hoping for something in this book that wasn’t there. This book is really about the theological process of Brandon and Jen letting go of their understanding of church. Reading this mad Jen’s writing is mostly light and entertaining and engaging. I would not recommend listening to this book because I think the way the narrator reads it takes away from the fun flippancy of her style. I suspect I would have enjoyed it more in actual book form. I’m looking forward to reading “7” because I think I was hoping for something in this book that wasn’t there. This book is really about the theological process of Brandon and Jen letting go of their understanding of church. Reading this made me thankful to be part of the denomination called ELCA, which creates sustainability for people and villages around the world. It reaches what Jen hopes for in a church that cares for people where they are, genuinely being Christ to the neighbor. I did appreciate her accurate criticism of American churches that serve people who simply want to be served. She paints a nice picture of the straightforward ministry of Jesus that was most critical of the religious people and most passionate about the people who are ignored.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amber Spencer

    This is such an interesting book. It feels very much like the awakening that all Christians must go through if they truly are to grasp what following Christ is all about. This book didn’t feel preachy, it felt real, honest and like a good, hard look at what happens when we turn our hearts over to Jesus Christ.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Havebooks Willread

    I finished this one a week ago and still am having trouble formulating my thoughts. It's one that makes a person think, for sure! It doesn't help that I read it right after reading The Prodigal God and in conjunction with watching A Path Appears (about sex trafficking). I'm filled with this urge to DO something, but I don't know what TO do! I don't agree 100% with Jen's thoughts, but there is still a lot worth pondering--and really, even pondering whether I agree with each idea and WHY (or why no I finished this one a week ago and still am having trouble formulating my thoughts. It's one that makes a person think, for sure! It doesn't help that I read it right after reading The Prodigal God and in conjunction with watching A Path Appears (about sex trafficking). I'm filled with this urge to DO something, but I don't know what TO do! I don't agree 100% with Jen's thoughts, but there is still a lot worth pondering--and really, even pondering whether I agree with each idea and WHY (or why not) is worth the read. She made me evaluate my tendency to be "immersed in my niche tribe" (which I tend to call "my people" and where I am most comfortable) and wonder if I'm "cut off from the fresh spiritual wind blowing all over the place" (xix) within the first few pages of the book. I hope to find time soon to write out some of my thoughts which may include some of the following notes (again, how I wish there was a way to save a "draft", but I can't find a big block of time to write this out all at once. :) One of the advantages of blogging over goodreads reviews! --verses about poverty and helping the poor --be different just for the sake of being different? no! --pg 94 religiosity without transformation --helping saints, first to the household of faith?? --can't just think, must ACT --Savior complex vs. relationship --going without knowing where. . .and if you go, expect to be misunderstood --be separate/holy vs. serving in the trenches --conforming to the postmodern worldview vs. I Cor. 9:20?? --complaining about the church vs. being the church you want to see

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jason Collins

    Highly recommended. In a short 168 pages, Jen explores the process of how the Hatmakers live out their faith. The conclusions might be specific to Jen, but I think the questions are important to all. Interrupted led me to ask: What does it mean to "Love my neighbor" to serve "the least of these"? Right now, my life as a Christian doesn't look that different than the lives of friends that don't claim a faith. Is that OK? How much of my effort / attention should be directed into the church (the build Highly recommended. In a short 168 pages, Jen explores the process of how the Hatmakers live out their faith. The conclusions might be specific to Jen, but I think the questions are important to all. Interrupted led me to ask: What does it mean to "Love my neighbor" to serve "the least of these"? Right now, my life as a Christian doesn't look that different than the lives of friends that don't claim a faith. Is that OK? How much of my effort / attention should be directed into the church (the building) vs how much should be directed into the community? What are the benefits both to me and the recipient in both scenarios? Although not specifically addressed in the book, it resurfaced my own questions about why there are (seemingly) few organizations that both 1) embrace a conservative Christian theology and 2) have a heart for meeting real physical needs in the community and around the world. What are the pros & cons of serving the community via secular organizations vs faith-based organizations? Oh, and did I mention that she's really funny?

  22. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    For the first time in my entire life, I had a group of friends get together at my house and we discussed this book. When I finished it, I realized there was a study you could buy to go along with this book. THAT would have been helpful to know! :) This book challenged me in so very many ways. It was not at all what I was expected. At. All. I have only read a few of Jen's blogs so I sorta fell into this but I think God knew exactly what He was planning when this was the book I settled on reading. Th For the first time in my entire life, I had a group of friends get together at my house and we discussed this book. When I finished it, I realized there was a study you could buy to go along with this book. THAT would have been helpful to know! :) This book challenged me in so very many ways. It was not at all what I was expected. At. All. I have only read a few of Jen's blogs so I sorta fell into this but I think God knew exactly what He was planning when this was the book I settled on reading. The thing that I will MOST walk away from is missions. She took what I had known all my life and shattered it to turn it into something much more beautiful. I began this book with hardly an underline. I ended this book with three kinds of ink and underlines and me digging in my Bible on my own to see what God really does say. It blew my mind. Now that I have finished it, I can't wait to hear what my study group girls think of it as well. And I cannot wait to see what journey this knowledge may take us on.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Disclaimer: this is not a how to book for making your church missional-minded. It's more of a commentary about why it's so important to be so. Jen shares from a place of learning after reading and living through a time when God re-oriented she and her husbands lives around how to BE the Church. I loved it. This book is hard to read because it confronts complacency in me, but it's also exciting to think about what God could do when we give people what they need - not a handful of cash or a moment Disclaimer: this is not a how to book for making your church missional-minded. It's more of a commentary about why it's so important to be so. Jen shares from a place of learning after reading and living through a time when God re-oriented she and her husbands lives around how to BE the Church. I loved it. This book is hard to read because it confronts complacency in me, but it's also exciting to think about what God could do when we give people what they need - not a handful of cash or a moment of prayer - spending our lives on giving others dignity and grace. My prayer is to see my church living on mission, knowing that Monday through Friday shows us alive or dead.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Becky Giovagnoni

    Of all the authors I've ever read, Jen Hatmaker is the author I most relate to. She writes in a casual, easy-going manner, but at the same time, addresses deep issues and difficult topics head on. She is funny, honest, transparent, and likable. I wish I knew her in person. This book is the story of her (and her husband's) journey to start Austin New Church. I read this book after reading (and loving) her newest book, 7. As with that one, I came away from this book motivated and wanting to live a Of all the authors I've ever read, Jen Hatmaker is the author I most relate to. She writes in a casual, easy-going manner, but at the same time, addresses deep issues and difficult topics head on. She is funny, honest, transparent, and likable. I wish I knew her in person. This book is the story of her (and her husband's) journey to start Austin New Church. I read this book after reading (and loving) her newest book, 7. As with that one, I came away from this book motivated and wanting to live a more authentic and passionate life.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joni

    She perfectly captured the bs that is called Christianity today and verbalized the cognitive dissonance I have with America's consumerist culture. You have effectively humbled me yet again Hatmaker. I'm ruined with a new rebelliousness toward apathetic, judgmental, and ineffectual religious quid pro quo. Such a great book at such a perfect time in my life.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Davenport

    Can I give this ten stars?! Jen spoke into my heart and put the thoughts rattling around in my head down in words. This book has both ruined and enriched my life and I am taking action and making changes at both big and minute levels in my life. Well done Jen Hatmaker. Please be my new BFF. Seriously.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Mcvicker

    This book took a long time to read. Not because it was boring (far from it) or dry (not even close), but because it was full of new ideas and fresh thoughts that made me question my purpose in this place where God has brought me. One read through is not enough. This is a book to apply to my life.

  28. 5 out of 5

    MacKenzie

    I liked this book but not as much as 7 and For the Love. I listened to the audiobook and wished that she had read it but was able to get past it... mostly. Very though provoking- wonderful insight on the modern church. I liked what she had to say about modernism and postmodernism.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    This is my favorite yet of Jen's books. It has enough of her humor to know it's her but it seems to have more "heart" behind it. I feel like I understand better and buy in even more to the mission she has been given.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Emmaline Soken-Huberty

    Pretty much wrecked me.

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