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Lady Cottington's Pressed Fairy Book

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This is a reproduction of the diary of Lady Angelica Cottingham, which features pressed garden fairies. Or rather the psychic images of the fairies, who quickly turned it into a game, where they leapt between the closing pages in an effort to outdo each other to produce the most outrageous poses.


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This is a reproduction of the diary of Lady Angelica Cottingham, which features pressed garden fairies. Or rather the psychic images of the fairies, who quickly turned it into a game, where they leapt between the closing pages in an effort to outdo each other to produce the most outrageous poses.

30 review for Lady Cottington's Pressed Fairy Book

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Vacca

    Based on the series of turn-of-the-century photos of the supposed “Cottingley Fairies”, Lady Cottington’s Pressed Fairy Book is definitely not a children’s book, but rather a morbid fantasy told through journal entries about a horrid imp of a girl who makes a hobby of crushing fairies in between the pages of her dairy. Designed to resemble a reproduction of the awful little girl’s actual journal, the book comes with dozens of wonderful drawings—courtesy of Brian Froud, the man behind the creatur Based on the series of turn-of-the-century photos of the supposed “Cottingley Fairies”, Lady Cottington’s Pressed Fairy Book is definitely not a children’s book, but rather a morbid fantasy told through journal entries about a horrid imp of a girl who makes a hobby of crushing fairies in between the pages of her dairy. Designed to resemble a reproduction of the awful little girl’s actual journal, the book comes with dozens of wonderful drawings—courtesy of Brian Froud, the man behind the creature designs for the movies Labyrinth and The Dark Crystal—of fairies splattered across age-yellowed pages. Terry Jones of Monty Python renown is on writing duty, and he gleefully presents the Lady’s entries as a series of increasingly disturbing snapshots of the life she leads smooshing fairies, goblins, sprites, pixies, any pint-sized magical creature she can snap her book shut on like a trap. As the story unfolds, the Lady grows up into a lady and enters a grimmsian world of lusty lords, perverted bishops and a dark underpinning of carnality. A delightfully gloomy book; recommended for ages 6 and up.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mir

    Just read this again because I accidentally ordered it when I meant to order the sequel, Lady Cottington's Fairy Album. Cux those titles aren't really similar or anything... Just read this again because I accidentally ordered it when I meant to order the sequel, Lady Cottington's Fairy Album. Cux those titles aren't really similar or anything...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Urges

    I just love Froud.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia

    Personally, I love Terry Jones's strange yet very creative story and Brian Froud's magical artwork in this book. Terry Jones has always been one of my favorites in the “Python” gang of movies and the old BBC shows of “Monty Python & the Flying Circus” and Froud's gorgeous watercolor artwork is enchanting…even if the fairies all met an untimely squashing by a naughty little girl. "Lady Cottington's Pressed Fairy Book" is full of the former Python's quirky story of what else...pressed fairies...the Personally, I love Terry Jones's strange yet very creative story and Brian Froud's magical artwork in this book. Terry Jones has always been one of my favorites in the “Python” gang of movies and the old BBC shows of “Monty Python & the Flying Circus” and Froud's gorgeous watercolor artwork is enchanting…even if the fairies all met an untimely squashing by a naughty little girl. "Lady Cottington's Pressed Fairy Book" is full of the former Python's quirky story of what else...pressed fairies...the poor dears. Squished at the prime of their tiny lives to create a scrapbook/diary for one, Miss Cottington. Actually, I believe there were some other odd little characters smooshed in the book, too...kind of green, slimy looking creatures...cute critters actually...:> Frankly, I bought the book for the artwork (and the awesome pressed fairy stickers that came with it!) but enjoyed the story written in diary-style of how two young girls in the days of early photography spoofed Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and a myriad of others into believing they had actually captured pictures of fairies in a photograph. What fun!

  5. 4 out of 5

    lethe

    Confusingly, the Dutch title, translated back into English, is "Lady Cottington's Fairy Album", which happens to be the title of the second instalment of Angelica Cottington's adventures with fairies, published only in 2002. This, however, is a translation of the first book, with text by Terry Jones and artwork by Brian Froud. Although I am a fan of Terry Jones's work, I didn't like this book as much as I did the second. It is funny, but the squashing of fairies got a bit old and the book ended ra Confusingly, the Dutch title, translated back into English, is "Lady Cottington's Fairy Album", which happens to be the title of the second instalment of Angelica Cottington's adventures with fairies, published only in 2002. This, however, is a translation of the first book, with text by Terry Jones and artwork by Brian Froud. Although I am a fan of Terry Jones's work, I didn't like this book as much as I did the second. It is funny, but the squashing of fairies got a bit old and the book ended rather abruptly. In Lady Cottington's Fairy Album, Brian Froud managed to add some real depth and poignancy to the story. Plus there were photographs! An amusing quote:"Ah! Je borsten zijn witter dan een blanco cheque!"which no doubt reads as"Ah! Your breasts are whiter than a blank cheque!"in the original. What's also amusing is that the library has catalogued this under author Angelica Cottington and SISO classification code 908.5 ("Ethnology - Superstition, including witchcraft and magic"), as if Angelica was real and this was an actual non-fiction book on fairies. 😄

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lila

    Lady Cottington’s journal is a coming of age story equipped with squished and squashed faires, pixes, and goblins! Angelica Cottington has the ability to see fae folk, but of course no one believes her. She grows and gets into some pretty hilarious romantic situations..which she blames on the fairies. I’ve loved Brian Froud since labyrinth (5th grade.) The journal entries are so darn believable that I was sure it was at least loosely based on some fairy sightings. I wasn’t able to find anything. Lady Cottington’s journal is a coming of age story equipped with squished and squashed faires, pixes, and goblins! Angelica Cottington has the ability to see fae folk, but of course no one believes her. She grows and gets into some pretty hilarious romantic situations..which she blames on the fairies. I’ve loved Brian Froud since labyrinth (5th grade.) The journal entries are so darn believable that I was sure it was at least loosely based on some fairy sightings. I wasn’t able to find anything..:( I still believe though… Actually I did find the Cottingley Fairy incident.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melanti

    Froud's artwork is as lovely as ever. His pastel, water color type style meshes well with the subject of pressed-fairies. The concept of the naughty, bawdy fairies is quite charming and they had me chuckling to myself. The story itself - the diary of the girl who captured the fairies - is often amusing and charming, but at times quite terrible. Froud's artwork is as lovely as ever. His pastel, water color type style meshes well with the subject of pressed-fairies. The concept of the naughty, bawdy fairies is quite charming and they had me chuckling to myself. The story itself - the diary of the girl who captured the fairies - is often amusing and charming, but at times quite terrible.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Found a copy of the first edition today, yes! Finally after years of owning the pocket edition of this excellent book. What a beauty.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Madalina

    “Skamperdans never wears her drawers. And that’s why she’s always stealing yours. And stockings too.” https://mbuubooks.blogspot.com/2019/0... “Skamperdans never wears her drawers. And that’s why she’s always stealing yours. And stockings too.” https://mbuubooks.blogspot.com/2019/0...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    I read this book when I was in middle school I think, but even now I look back at it as very well done and interesting. The entire book is full of "pressed fairies" that a young girl finds in her garden over a period in her life. The book is set up like a diary, and the illustrations are just beautiful. There is some nudity (as fairies aren't that modest), but that part of the book made it even more intriguing for a pre-pubescent as I was at the time. Really, it's nothing to get upset over as it I read this book when I was in middle school I think, but even now I look back at it as very well done and interesting. The entire book is full of "pressed fairies" that a young girl finds in her garden over a period in her life. The book is set up like a diary, and the illustrations are just beautiful. There is some nudity (as fairies aren't that modest), but that part of the book made it even more intriguing for a pre-pubescent as I was at the time. Really, it's nothing to get upset over as it is all portrayed as natural and artistic. A really nicely made book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tim Evanson

    The story is typical Monty Python -- lots of sexual innuendo, double-entendre, and some not-so-subtle crudity. What this book is all about is the incredible artwork, which shows a host of faeries, goblins, elves, and others. All crushed (brutally, gorily, hysterically) between the pages of a book by a Victorian girl. You get funny faces, nudity, gushes of bodily fluid, and outrageous poses. It's as if you drove a car at high speed through Fairy Land, and photographed the remains on your front win The story is typical Monty Python -- lots of sexual innuendo, double-entendre, and some not-so-subtle crudity. What this book is all about is the incredible artwork, which shows a host of faeries, goblins, elves, and others. All crushed (brutally, gorily, hysterically) between the pages of a book by a Victorian girl. You get funny faces, nudity, gushes of bodily fluid, and outrageous poses. It's as if you drove a car at high speed through Fairy Land, and photographed the remains on your front windshield. It's great!!!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    Having raised my daughter on Cicely Mary Barker's flower fairy images and poems, this send-up had me rolling with laughter. The fairies are the faces of repressed and sometimes deviant sexual desire. The irony is rich and fun. Having raised my daughter on Cicely Mary Barker's flower fairy images and poems, this send-up had me rolling with laughter. The fairies are the faces of repressed and sometimes deviant sexual desire. The irony is rich and fun.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sezín Koehler

    Oh my Fairy Goddess! What a wonderful and creative book. I recommend it with all the fairy love I have in my heart, that certainly grew bigger upon reading this. A true delight of a book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    While I very much enjoyed the art work the story was less to be desired. It started out rather fun but made an awful turn for the worse. Very unfortunate. Had such potential.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ellie Wyatt

    okay..cool idea. been dying to read this book for like...a lifetime. and now that I finally have..am I the only one completely disturbed by the repeated fairy rape? wtf?

  16. 5 out of 5

    harms

    What did I think? I don't know. I'm very conflicted What did I think? I don't know. I'm very conflicted

  17. 4 out of 5

    ALLEN

    Old hoaxes never die -- they just come back sillier than ever. Around the time of World War One, two well-to-do British girls, cousins, were larking about with their cameras and claimed to have "discovered" fairies. While to the 21st-Century eye these fairies look like the obvious hoax they were, at the time they were enough to convince Sir Arthur Conan Doyle of their authenticity (partly due to the fact, we suspect, that A.C. Doyle was a devout Theosophist and wanted very badly to believe in su Old hoaxes never die -- they just come back sillier than ever. Around the time of World War One, two well-to-do British girls, cousins, were larking about with their cameras and claimed to have "discovered" fairies. While to the 21st-Century eye these fairies look like the obvious hoax they were, at the time they were enough to convince Sir Arthur Conan Doyle of their authenticity (partly due to the fact, we suspect, that A.C. Doyle was a devout Theosophist and wanted very badly to believe in such spiritual manifestations). They were known as the "Cottingley Fairies." Fast-forward to 1994, when Monty Python member Terry Jones released this book, "proving" that the fairies did exist -- and that they had been pressed (squashed, really) like faded roses in the pages of a book kept by one "Lady Cottington." Gross, gruesome, grim, but the shock appeal alone is enough to make it funny. The wave of ensuing LADY COTTINGTON'S PRESSED FAIRY BOOKs extended even to our own century. Expect to be amused, but if you buy over the Internet, be sure to get the full-sized original books out of Pavilion (UK) or Barnes & Noble (USA) publishers -- not the later B&N versions that are so small the "0riginal" girlish script can barely be read. Enough to fool even smart people in 1917. CAVEAT: The fairies pictured in this book are caught in poses of agony, and frequently nude too. Should not be viewed by impressionable children under age 34. (One of the milder pictures from the book, actually)

  18. 5 out of 5

    BookWormYami

    Let me start out by saying that this book is not for kids. It has a dark tone and adult theme. I enjoyed this book. It was like I was reading someone's diary, lol. I love books like that. I also like how the "writing" in the book starts of child like and then it changes to more of an adult "writing" as Lady Cottongton grows older. By child like, I mean misspelled words and things like that. I looove the look of this book! It looks worn out a bit and it feels lovely. I also enjoyed the illustrati Let me start out by saying that this book is not for kids. It has a dark tone and adult theme. I enjoyed this book. It was like I was reading someone's diary, lol. I love books like that. I also like how the "writing" in the book starts of child like and then it changes to more of an adult "writing" as Lady Cottongton grows older. By child like, I mean misspelled words and things like that. I looove the look of this book! It looks worn out a bit and it feels lovely. I also enjoyed the illustrations done by Brian Froud. If you don't know who he is, he worked on some creatures for Jim Henson's Dark Crystal and Labyrinth. I love those movies, especially Labyrinth! Oh, Jareth, how I love you!!! Ok, I'm getting way off topic here. Where was I. Oh, yeah, Brian Froud. I love his fairies and goblins creatures. I wish this book was a bit longer but I seen there is a second book and I definitely want to check it out. If you enjoy dark tales with fairies in them, then you might want to check this out. It's definitely a fast read seeing how short this book is.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marc

    A fun book, but I was told it was a bad birthday gift for my 10 year old niece. The replacement book, Wolves in the Walls scared her away from reading for a few months. Sigh. Kids..

  20. 4 out of 5

    Leticia

    This is written in a diary/memoir format, the text didn't keep me interested enough to read it carefully. It's not something really for children since some of the pictures are quite sensual. A whimsical, curious little book. This is written in a diary/memoir format, the text didn't keep me interested enough to read it carefully. It's not something really for children since some of the pictures are quite sensual. A whimsical, curious little book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    I love this book, have read many times - it's fantastical and fantastic! I love this book, have read many times - it's fantastical and fantastic!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Well, this was a difficult book to rate, mainly because somewhere there should have been some mention that this wasn't merely a cute picture book. I picked it up thinking it would simply be a series of smashed fairy pictures with cute, light descriptions by the girl who did the squishing. This book, while full of fun, interesting pictures, is not a light book, nor a children's book. And I guess that was my main issue with it. It was well done. The pictures were fascinating, and the story was good Well, this was a difficult book to rate, mainly because somewhere there should have been some mention that this wasn't merely a cute picture book. I picked it up thinking it would simply be a series of smashed fairy pictures with cute, light descriptions by the girl who did the squishing. This book, while full of fun, interesting pictures, is not a light book, nor a children's book. And I guess that was my main issue with it. It was well done. The pictures were fascinating, and the story was good, but I don't think it was properly presented. Because of how the book was presented, how the beginning played out, starting with Angelica's childhood obsession of capturing fairies between the pages of a book, the underlying social commentary was just not readily accessible, and to me sort of difficult to actually pick up on. At first I actually hated the story...when (view spoiler)[ the book suddenly turned from funny-fairy-squishing to rape and more rape, well, it was a bit difficult to enjoy. There was no indication whatsoever that this was anything other than a light picture book, after all, so it was jarring and not exactly funny. I can only assume that a great many people won't pick up on it at all, though, so probably it won't have any effect for them. However, I liked it better when I reflected on it a bit more and saw that it was referring more to societal roles, places, etc. Realizing that the rape was in there more to show that the woman was being oppressed by society and disbelieved every time she mentioned the fairies (which were causing this...so in short, mentioning the oppression--which, of course, no one would admit was real) (hide spoiler)] made me appreciate the book more. Overall, though, I don't think it was as effective as could be. Because I had no warning for the...um, more weighty matter slipped into an otherwise light, childish-looking book, I was completely unprepared for it and mistakenly took it for awful writing. If you just care for the interesting artwork, though, the book is lovely; if you're going to read the text also, be aware this isn't a children's book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nadia

    Don't expect some cutesy book about fairies. The further you delve into the story that Angelica writes the more twisted it gets, I might even go so far as to suggest a trigger warning. Nevertheless this is a beautiful book. My version of it is a beautiful large hardback but the cover is soft like foam. It's absolutely gorgeous and feels really nice. The fairies are amazingly drawn, the splatter effect on the opposing page really give the impression fairies have been squashed between the pages. I Don't expect some cutesy book about fairies. The further you delve into the story that Angelica writes the more twisted it gets, I might even go so far as to suggest a trigger warning. Nevertheless this is a beautiful book. My version of it is a beautiful large hardback but the cover is soft like foam. It's absolutely gorgeous and feels really nice. The fairies are amazingly drawn, the splatter effect on the opposing page really give the impression fairies have been squashed between the pages. I absolutely love the art. One of the things I love is how Angelica's age is captured. When she's younger the writing style reflects that and I didn't realise how twisted her action of squashing the fairies was quite till the end. But she grows up and she maintains this naivety of people who don't want to get any older. Admittedly the story itself made me a little uncomfortable while I was reading it but not in the sense where I was entertained. It's meant to be a bit twisted. This little girl squashes fairies between the pages until they're gone, that is twisted. And as Angelica gets older the fairies grow a bit more uhm... what's the word? They like to mess with Angelica and at some point things start to get out of hand in a sexual nature. Angelica doesn't go into detail, but enough to give you suspicions about what happens and it's not pleasant. This is why I'm not sure how I feel about this. These fairies aren't good guys and I like how twisted they are and Angelica is messed up too. As a result if you delve deep enough into the undertones it's quite an unnerving story. But sometimes it's entertaining to read something that makes you uncomfortable.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Through the handwritten journal of Lady Cottington we learn details of her life, beginning in early childhood to her later years. Her spelling and penmanship go through the expected changes of maturity. Angelica is obviously thought of as backward by her family and friends, but this only serves her up with a decidedly warped draw. The stories itself is slightly dark, but creative and even a bit sexual. Throughout the book however, it is apparent that a number of men are interested in quirky Ange Through the handwritten journal of Lady Cottington we learn details of her life, beginning in early childhood to her later years. Her spelling and penmanship go through the expected changes of maturity. Angelica is obviously thought of as backward by her family and friends, but this only serves her up with a decidedly warped draw. The stories itself is slightly dark, but creative and even a bit sexual. Throughout the book however, it is apparent that a number of men are interested in quirky Angelica. These suggestive segments are rather graphic, yet the purposeful omission allows us to draw our own conclusions. Whether we are to assume that Angelica is molested or abused by any of the men is unclear, but her flight from England to Italy due to one particularly painful encounter is hint enough. This slightly perverse pleasure has been on my bookshelf for years. I have shared it with my granddaughter, and her eyes grew round as saucers! She probably never imagined naked faeries, let alone the sad fact that a little girl would squash them in a book ~SPLAT!~ Of course to the more mature woman, the concept of naughty, lewd little faeries is quite amusing. Brian Froud's artwork is as enchanting as it is curious. His pastel water color agonies illustrate well the subject of pressed (or is it repressed?) fairies. This book is a wicked riot!

  25. 5 out of 5

    sj

    I just today remembered that this book existed. I read the whole thing standing in a used book store one afternoon shortly after it came out, and was more than a little disgusted by it. The art is lovely, but it was the concept that I found bothersome. Why? (view spoiler)[Because, yes, as an adult - I still believe in faeries. (hide spoiler)] A friend got it for me as a birthday gift not long after I read it, thinking that it would be perfect for faerie loving me, and I gave that grin that says to I just today remembered that this book existed. I read the whole thing standing in a used book store one afternoon shortly after it came out, and was more than a little disgusted by it. The art is lovely, but it was the concept that I found bothersome. Why? (view spoiler)[Because, yes, as an adult - I still believe in faeries. (hide spoiler)] A friend got it for me as a birthday gift not long after I read it, thinking that it would be perfect for faerie loving me, and I gave that grin that says to most people "Oh, I LOVE IT!" but really means "Oh, I love YOU, so I'll PRETEND to love it!" Everyone has one of those grins, I've perfected mine over a number of years. I wanted to love this book, but the thought of smushing faeries, even if it's just to capture their essences (which really sounds dirty now that I think about it) put a bad taste in my mouth (which furthers that dirtiness earlier in the sentence, I guess). It's kind of making me sad thinking about it now, and I'm glad this wasn't around when I was a kid. I would have taken the whole thing as a personal affront and refused to ever watch Monty Python again because Terry Jones would have been DEAD TO ME. He was never my favourite, anyway.

  26. 4 out of 5

    T.L. Wood

    A very witty tale told from a proper little old British lady’s point of view. You will find yourself chuckling out loud as you envision her running around her lovely old English garden in her Victorian lace dress and petticoat smashing little faeries in between her little note books. The video disk that comes with the book is also funny that shows Terry Jones narrating dressed in drag as a woman talking about these dreadful little creatures that she tries to catch. It’s a well worth easy read an A very witty tale told from a proper little old British lady’s point of view. You will find yourself chuckling out loud as you envision her running around her lovely old English garden in her Victorian lace dress and petticoat smashing little faeries in between her little note books. The video disk that comes with the book is also funny that shows Terry Jones narrating dressed in drag as a woman talking about these dreadful little creatures that she tries to catch. It’s a well worth easy read and Brian Froud’s artwork is always amazing!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Monique

    This is a very, very funny book about a young girl who catch a faerie in her book... Catched it with a SNAPPP! Because nobody believes her she decides to catch more faeries in her pressed flower book. During the years she SNAP SNAP SNAP catch faeries until she's to old to see them. The combination of Terry Jones hilarious text and Brian Froud's crazy pressed faeries makes this a wonderful book to read. I had to laugh about every pressed faerie because of the funny faces... hmmm... actually a litt This is a very, very funny book about a young girl who catch a faerie in her book... Catched it with a SNAPPP! Because nobody believes her she decides to catch more faeries in her pressed flower book. During the years she SNAP SNAP SNAP catch faeries until she's to old to see them. The combination of Terry Jones hilarious text and Brian Froud's crazy pressed faeries makes this a wonderful book to read. I had to laugh about every pressed faerie because of the funny faces... hmmm... actually a little sad now I think about it... ^_^

  28. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Pietro

    I love love love this book. I owned the big hardcover edition but this one being small like a journal really gave me the understanding of how she wrote and how small the fairies where that she caught and smashed. It's tiny yet still has that magical imagination. The pictures are still breathtaking. I just love this edition. I love love love this book. I owned the big hardcover edition but this one being small like a journal really gave me the understanding of how she wrote and how small the fairies where that she caught and smashed. It's tiny yet still has that magical imagination. The pictures are still breathtaking. I just love this edition.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sadie Forsythe

    I really love this book. I love this book so much I've bought it 3 times. I don't mean a copy for myself and two friends, but bought it for myself 3 times. (The first was lost in a move, the third I bought just for a new squashed fairy decal to put in my car window). There isn't a lot of actual writing, but the fairies crack me up every-time I look at them. I really love this book. I love this book so much I've bought it 3 times. I don't mean a copy for myself and two friends, but bought it for myself 3 times. (The first was lost in a move, the third I bought just for a new squashed fairy decal to put in my car window). There isn't a lot of actual writing, but the fairies crack me up every-time I look at them.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    How very disconcerting to turn the pages of this scrapbook-like tale, and find fairies literally pressed between the pages, much as someone would press a pansy picked in the lane by a lover. If you believe in fairies, this may upset you. If not, this may still upset you. Very entertaining text to go with the fairies, whose expressions when caught and slapped between the pages are very bizarre.

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