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How to Write a Novel Using the Snowflake Method (Advanced Fiction Writing Book 1)

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A Magical Key to Unlock Your Creative Wizard Are you writing a novel, but having trouble getting your first draft written? You’ve heard of “outlining,” but that sounds too rigid for you. You’ve heard of “organic writing,” but that seems a bit squishy to you. Take a look at the wildly popular Snowflake Method—a battle-tested series of ten steps that jump-start your creativ A Magical Key to Unlock Your Creative Wizard Are you writing a novel, but having trouble getting your first draft written? You’ve heard of “outlining,” but that sounds too rigid for you. You’ve heard of “organic writing,” but that seems a bit squishy to you. Take a look at the wildly popular Snowflake Method—a battle-tested series of ten steps that jump-start your creativity and help you quickly map out your story. All around the world, novelists are using the Snowflake Method right now to ignite their imaginations and get their first drafts down on paper. In this book, you’ll follow the story of a fictitious novelist as she learns to tap into the amazing power of the Snowflake Method. Almost magically, she finds her story growing from a simple idea into a deep and powerful novel. And she finds her novel changing her—turning her into a stronger, more courageous person. Zany, Over the Top, and Just Plain Fun How to Write a Novel Using the Snowflake Method is a “business parable”—a how-to guide written in story form. It’s zany. It’s over the top. It’s just plain fun. Most important, it’s effective, because it shows you, rather than telling you. You’ll learn by example how to grow your story idea into a sizzling first draft. You’ll discover: How to define your “target audience” the right way, so you know exactly how your ideal readers think and feel. Forget what the experts tell you about “demographics.” How to create a dynamite selling tool that will instantly tell people whether they’ll love your story or hate it. And you want them to either love it or hate it. How to get inside the skin of every one of your characters—even your villain. Especially your villain. How to find a deep, emotively powerful theme for your story. Do you know the one best point in your novel to unveil your theme—when your reader is most eager to hear it? How to know when to backtrack, and why backtracking is essential to writing great fiction. How to fire-test each scene to guarantee it’ll be high-impact—before you write it. Excerpt from Chapter 1 Goldilocks had always wanted to write a novel. She learned to read before she went to kindergarten. In grade school, she always had her nose in a book. In junior high, the other kids thought she was weird, because she actually liked reading those dusty old novels in literature class. All through high school, Goldilocks dreamed of writing a book of her own someday. But when she went to college, her parents persuaded her to study something practical. Goldilocks hated practical, and secretly she kept reading novels. But she was a very obedient girl, so she did what her parents told her. She got a very practical degree in marketing. After college, she got a job that bored her to tears—but at least it was practical. Then she got married, and within a few years, she had two children, a girl and then a boy.


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A Magical Key to Unlock Your Creative Wizard Are you writing a novel, but having trouble getting your first draft written? You’ve heard of “outlining,” but that sounds too rigid for you. You’ve heard of “organic writing,” but that seems a bit squishy to you. Take a look at the wildly popular Snowflake Method—a battle-tested series of ten steps that jump-start your creativ A Magical Key to Unlock Your Creative Wizard Are you writing a novel, but having trouble getting your first draft written? You’ve heard of “outlining,” but that sounds too rigid for you. You’ve heard of “organic writing,” but that seems a bit squishy to you. Take a look at the wildly popular Snowflake Method—a battle-tested series of ten steps that jump-start your creativity and help you quickly map out your story. All around the world, novelists are using the Snowflake Method right now to ignite their imaginations and get their first drafts down on paper. In this book, you’ll follow the story of a fictitious novelist as she learns to tap into the amazing power of the Snowflake Method. Almost magically, she finds her story growing from a simple idea into a deep and powerful novel. And she finds her novel changing her—turning her into a stronger, more courageous person. Zany, Over the Top, and Just Plain Fun How to Write a Novel Using the Snowflake Method is a “business parable”—a how-to guide written in story form. It’s zany. It’s over the top. It’s just plain fun. Most important, it’s effective, because it shows you, rather than telling you. You’ll learn by example how to grow your story idea into a sizzling first draft. You’ll discover: How to define your “target audience” the right way, so you know exactly how your ideal readers think and feel. Forget what the experts tell you about “demographics.” How to create a dynamite selling tool that will instantly tell people whether they’ll love your story or hate it. And you want them to either love it or hate it. How to get inside the skin of every one of your characters—even your villain. Especially your villain. How to find a deep, emotively powerful theme for your story. Do you know the one best point in your novel to unveil your theme—when your reader is most eager to hear it? How to know when to backtrack, and why backtracking is essential to writing great fiction. How to fire-test each scene to guarantee it’ll be high-impact—before you write it. Excerpt from Chapter 1 Goldilocks had always wanted to write a novel. She learned to read before she went to kindergarten. In grade school, she always had her nose in a book. In junior high, the other kids thought she was weird, because she actually liked reading those dusty old novels in literature class. All through high school, Goldilocks dreamed of writing a book of her own someday. But when she went to college, her parents persuaded her to study something practical. Goldilocks hated practical, and secretly she kept reading novels. But she was a very obedient girl, so she did what her parents told her. She got a very practical degree in marketing. After college, she got a job that bored her to tears—but at least it was practical. Then she got married, and within a few years, she had two children, a girl and then a boy.

30 review for How to Write a Novel Using the Snowflake Method (Advanced Fiction Writing Book 1)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Katie Grace

    This is my new favorite book, and I'm totally going to use this for every novel for the REST OF MY LIFE. So everyone needs to go read it next time they're plotting a novel. :P This is my new favorite book, and I'm totally going to use this for every novel for the REST OF MY LIFE. So everyone needs to go read it next time they're plotting a novel. :P

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sebastien Castell

    In the spirit of the 'business parable' style of the book itself . . . "Good news! I've got a novel-writing system that might interest you!" "Really? That's great! Let's get . . . wait a second . . . you said 'Good news'." "Well, yes. A novel-writing syst—" "When people start with 'Good News', there's usually 'Bad News' that follows. Come on, out with it." "Oh, well, it's just that . . ." "Yes?" "I've decided to teach it to you by making you read a parable about Goldilocks going to a writing conference In the spirit of the 'business parable' style of the book itself . . . "Good news! I've got a novel-writing system that might interest you!" "Really? That's great! Let's get . . . wait a second . . . you said 'Good news'." "Well, yes. A novel-writing syst—" "When people start with 'Good News', there's usually 'Bad News' that follows. Come on, out with it." "Oh, well, it's just that . . ." "Yes?" "I've decided to teach it to you by making you read a parable about Goldilocks going to a writing conference and learning the methodology from Baby Bear!" Yep. Goldilocks learns Randy Ingermanson's writing system from the man himself wrapped in the character of Baby Bear (you know, outlining is too hard, pantsing is too soft, the snowflake method is just right.) If this sounds entertaining and illuminating to you, then you'll be happy to hear the entire book goes on like this until a brief summary at the end. If, on the other hand, reading page after page of Little Pig raising objections and Goldilocks continuously discovering she's a bit thick and needs the wise Baby Bear to unlock her writing potential, then this probably isn't the book for you. I'm not sure why those who devise novel or screenwriting methods never seem to show you their method applied to an actual, genuine novel or screenplay rather than either exclusively use examples from other people's work (who probably didn't follow that method) or just give you ones that they never felt worthy enough to use as the basis for an actual finished work. Ingermanson's written some novels; he could have included all his Snowflake work into his manual. But he didn't, and that makes it hard to take the system as seriously as it may deserve. Ingermanson's argument at the end of the book is that he did apply his method – to the Goldilocks parable for this book. That's really not the same, though, because you end up with a story that honestly would never stand on its own being excused by the fact that it exists only to communicate the method, and a method that isn't shown to be worthwhile because you never really see it in action in its entirety as applied to something publishable. Fans of the snowflake system will rightly point to its many adherents as proof, but again, pantsers can much more easily point to Stephen King and Lee Child and say, "Yeah? Well look at all the giants of the field who avoid notes, outlines, and other such paraphernalia entirely." So the question isn't whether some people like a system or even whether someone's written a successful book with it. The question is (as Ingermanson himself notes in the book), is this system for you: the individual trying to write a better novel. The snowflake system itself is quite simple (which is a virtue) and logical. However I can't tell you if it works or even if it's worth trying. If the "proof is in the pudding" as they say, and the forty thousand word story in this book is meant to be that pudding, then that's a problem. Even as a business parables go, Goldilocks, Baby Bear, The Big Bad Wolf, and the rest of them left me bored and irritated. None of this should make you shy away from the Snowflake Method or this book necessarily. What I would say is simply this: read the first chapter excerpt the author provides. If that engages you, then go for it. If you find yourself rolling your eyes at the metaphor, then you should probably consider finding another means to learn about the Snowflake Method.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brian 9 ¾ ⚡

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ OUTSTANDING Randy Ingermanson used storytelling to teach his readers about how to write a novel. Genius!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rose

    Quick review for a quick refresher read. I picked this up as my first read of the year because of some of the goals I'd set for myself in the new year. Granted, I have my own method of writing that I follow with composing a novel, but I always like to look at other methods and processes, and see how they may work for me. I've known about the Snowflake Method for a while now, but this was my first time perusing this little book with its creative explanation of it. I liked it, even if sometimes the Quick review for a quick refresher read. I picked this up as my first read of the year because of some of the goals I'd set for myself in the new year. Granted, I have my own method of writing that I follow with composing a novel, but I always like to look at other methods and processes, and see how they may work for me. I've known about the Snowflake Method for a while now, but this was my first time perusing this little book with its creative explanation of it. I liked it, even if sometimes the method of explaining the concept was a little convoluted. It did a decent job of summarizing key points at the end, and showing how the author used his own method to plot the story given in this guide. I liked the step by step application, and no doubt I'll refer to it when I find myself needing a visual example of how this method is applied. Overall, a valuable read. Overall rating: 3/5 stars.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Olivia Jarmusch

    I'll begin this review by saying that I am a discovery writer. I LOVE beginning with several vivid ideas, then allowing the story to ebb, flow, and take shape as the story grows into a life all it's own. BUT I know this isn't everyone's style. When people ask for writing advice from a panster like myself, it can be hard to know what to say. I don't have a "method" or "system" for my creativity, and I can't offer much more than, "Just write from your heart!" But that doesn't cut it for most peopl I'll begin this review by saying that I am a discovery writer. I LOVE beginning with several vivid ideas, then allowing the story to ebb, flow, and take shape as the story grows into a life all it's own. BUT I know this isn't everyone's style. When people ask for writing advice from a panster like myself, it can be hard to know what to say. I don't have a "method" or "system" for my creativity, and I can't offer much more than, "Just write from your heart!" But that doesn't cut it for most people. Most aspiring authors need a little bit of direction, a launching pad, and some boundaries! And now, for those who ask such questions, I'll know exactly what to do...give them this book! The Snowflake Method introduces a system that could teach anyone (and I mean, anyone!) how to write a novel. It's PACKED with all kinds of helpful information, which can be applied by total novices and seasoned authors alike. I think it's absolutely worth checking out for all authors, and gleaning whatever tidbits you can from it. My favorite part (aside from all the practicality of having such a solid system in place to actually START and FINISH your novel) was the creative aspect of this teaching tale. The entire method is learned as you attend a writers conference with Goldilocks, and her teachers, the 3 Bears! Childhood whimsy is struck as Goldilocks learns to write with the Three Little Pigs, the Big Bad Wolf, and Old Mother Hubbard. (I lovvveeeddd fairytales as I child, so I thought this was adorable.) This book loses a full star for me, because of some inappropriate content. Sleazy comments from Robin Hood and other characters were a bit much. It definitely didn't need that 'adult' content, and it threw me off as to why they'd mix in vulgar topics with these classic beloved fairytale characters. Anyway, just a heads up about that. My final thoughts? Even though I'm primary a discovery writer, I'm looking forward to trying out the Snowflake Method sometime soon. It was really fascinating, and I'd love to see what might come of it if I applied the 10-step system presented. The most VALUABLE thing I found in this book, was an entire chapter dedicated to writing a summary. I've always been terrible at synopsis' and summary's, but an author needs to know how to communicate their massive work into a few short, pointed, purposeful lines, and that's something I'm going to be working on! Thank you Randy, for letting me go to a 'Writers Conference' with Goldilocks, The Three Little Pigs, The Big Bad Wolf, and Old Mother Hubbard! It was fun. ;)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    I think this book was just what I needed for my outlining process! The way the author tells this method is really unique and creative and fun. It may not be for everybody, but I think the Snowflake method is for me. 😁👍

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dylan Perry

    5/5 This book. My God. I haven't even started writing a novel using the Snowflake Method (though that will change very soon) and yet I feel this has already helped my craft. (I'm somewhere between a 'pantser' and a 'plotter') From beginning to end I loved every sentence of this and how the steps of the Snowflake was told through a story, rather than presented as dry text. As I said, I haven't used the Snowflake yet. Some of these 10 steps might not work out for me. But one thing is sure: This book 5/5 This book. My God. I haven't even started writing a novel using the Snowflake Method (though that will change very soon) and yet I feel this has already helped my craft. (I'm somewhere between a 'pantser' and a 'plotter') From beginning to end I loved every sentence of this and how the steps of the Snowflake was told through a story, rather than presented as dry text. As I said, I haven't used the Snowflake yet. Some of these 10 steps might not work out for me. But one thing is sure: This book got me excited to write. A lot of writing craft books give you the information and that is it. Randy Ingermanson managed to do that through telling us a story of a woman struggling to write her first novel, and show through example of how he uses his methods instead of just telling us the steps. Though he summarizes how he crafted the story at the end of the book. If, like the main character, you are struggling with your first piece of writing, buy this. If you are feeling out methods, trying to figure out what works for you, buy this. Or if you simply want to read about another way of creating a story, do yourself a favor and pick this up. Now if you'll excuse me, I have to go write. 4/5

  8. 4 out of 5

    S. Peters-Davis

    Book Review – How to Write a Novel Using the Snowflake Method Author – Randy Ingermanson Genre – Non-fiction, Novel Writing Reference Book First Line: Goldilocks had always wanted to write a novel. Review: Mr. Ingermanson not only gives the step-by-step of the Snowflake Method of plotting, but he also gives an example through “story” – the one he’s written along with his explicit detailed steps. I’ve tried a number of ways to write my story and I’m always looking for the one that will tip the scale Book Review – How to Write a Novel Using the Snowflake Method Author – Randy Ingermanson Genre – Non-fiction, Novel Writing Reference Book First Line: Goldilocks had always wanted to write a novel. Review: Mr. Ingermanson not only gives the step-by-step of the Snowflake Method of plotting, but he also gives an example through “story” – the one he’s written along with his explicit detailed steps. I’ve tried a number of ways to write my story and I’m always looking for the one that will tip the scale to make my process more streamline and keep me writing. I believe I’ve found my answer in this book. It’s already improved my process time and lays out the events of the story so there’s no hold up or blank pages. It’s a good fit for me, and may be for you too.

  9. 5 out of 5

    J.F. Penn

    Excellent book with writing tips in an easy to read parable format. The snowflake method might be for you if you sit between plotting and pantsing.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    Of Kindles, Fairytales, and Snowflakes: Why Randy Ingermanson Might Be the Best Storyteller Ever! Winter is a great time for me to work on my writing skills. The weather prevents outdoor activity (temps barely above freezing today) and the toasty wood fireplace is conducive to creativity. With that in mind, I loaded my Christmas present, a Kindle Fire 6, with several writing craft books - my focus as always on plotting.The first book I opened was Randy Ingermanson’s How to Write a Novel Using Of Kindles, Fairytales, and Snowflakes: Why Randy Ingermanson Might Be the Best Storyteller Ever! Winter is a great time for me to work on my writing skills. The weather prevents outdoor activity (temps barely above freezing today) and the toasty wood fireplace is conducive to creativity. With that in mind, I loaded my Christmas present, a Kindle Fire 6, with several writing craft books - my focus as always on plotting.The first book I opened was Randy Ingermanson’s How to Write a Novel Using the Snowflake Method. I was hooked from line one: Goldilocks had always wanted to write a novel. My inner girl-child squealed in delight. I taught myself to read chapter stories at the age of eight by devouring an encyclopedia of fairytales. Mr. Ingermanson is a genius! He wove the Snowflake Method into a modern day fairy story involving my childhood favorite characters. The Three Bears, Big Bad Wolf, Little Pig, Robin Hood, Old Mother Hubbard - they were all there. I didn’t stop reading long enough to pull out my notebook even though in my head the voice of my grown-woman self kept yelling, “Write this down! It’s important!”I ignored all internal and external interruptions to follow Goldilocks as she learned to make a story out of the visions in her mind. I cheered as the lessons Baby Bear taught her like characters, good and villainous, need depth, also made sense to me. And as a bonus... While Goldilocks was attending this writers conference, there was a murder! A fairytale wrapped in a murder mystery - could this crime suspense writer be happier? It was the best hours I’ve ever spent reading a writing craft book.Yesterday I got out my notebook and went through Chapter 19: Summary of the Snowflake Method. I filled several pages then opened Scrivener to start work on a template that will help me use each step concisely. The only step I am modifying from Randy Ingermanson’s method is Step 8: Write a List of All Scenes. He recommends using a spreadsheet but I am determined that, after owning it for three years, I will master the Scrivener software in 2015. I will be using the corkboard and scene note cards in the place of spreadsheet columns and rows.As if the delightful format of How to Write a Novel Using the Snowflake Method was not enough, Mr. Ingermanson included Chapter 20: The Snowflake for This Book. He used his method to show exactly how it works with the story he wrote for teaching it. I can say unequivocally that I have never read a better craft book. Did I mention that this is Advanced Fiction Writing Book 1? I can’t wait for AFW Book 2!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shaun

    I just finished typing up a review for this book and it appears to have been lost. I'll try again although I don't think I have the patience to recreate the whole thing. There are two types of writers, as I understand it, "pantsers" and "planners." Pantsers write by the seats of their respective pants. They just sit down and they write. They do no planning ahead of time... no outlining. Planners, of course, plan. They are the opposite of pantsers. They carefully plan out every detail of their nov I just finished typing up a review for this book and it appears to have been lost. I'll try again although I don't think I have the patience to recreate the whole thing. There are two types of writers, as I understand it, "pantsers" and "planners." Pantsers write by the seats of their respective pants. They just sit down and they write. They do no planning ahead of time... no outlining. Planners, of course, plan. They are the opposite of pantsers. They carefully plan out every detail of their novel before they begin writing a word of it. Most of us fall somewhere in between those extremes, we do a little prep work then we get busy writing. Randy Ingermanson's "Snowflake Method" is described in detail on his blog: http://www.advancedfictionwriting.com.... The premise of The Snowflake Method is that you plan your novel in such a way that any problems with your novel are exposed (to you) as early in the process as possible so you can fix them with a minimal amount of effort. The Snowflake Method does not eliminate revision and rewriting, but it cuts down on it significantly... and it lets you know very early on if your story idea is just so glaringly flawed that it's not going to work. I've attempted to use The Snowflake Method in the past using only Randy's blog entry but I've not been successful. Now I've purchased his Snowflake Pro software, this book that I'm reviewing here, and Writing Fiction for Dummies on which Ingermanson is listed as a co-author. I'm using these to prep for this year's NaNoWriMo. The Snowflake Method is quite time consuming and it's looking like I won't have all my prep work done before NaNoWriMo begins (where are you, Baby Bear??). But so far I'm happy. I've discovered some really significant problems with my characters and my story that have taken me seconds or minutes to correct instead of hours or days if I had typed up a detailed outline or written a rough draft. Please "bear" with this book (pun intended). It's an instructional book wrapped in a cheesy story. But I can't believe that some people are giving this book a bad review because of the silly story. The reason for the story is because that's your example. Not only is it self-referential but Randy spends some time at the end of the book explaining how the story was prepared using The Snowflake Method. I recommend reading Randy's Blog entry. If the Snowflake Method sounds good to you, buy this book. Still got money to spend? Buy Fiction Writing for Dummies and get the discount on Randy's Snowflake Pro software. Then buy the software.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Filip

    Note about the rating: if you find this concept interesting, snatch the book by all means. It's only a depiction of the value that I personally got with it as I've known and applied it before reading the book. I sincerely hope Mr. Ingermanson won't take it as a slight. If you're remotely interested in being a writer but don't know how to construct your writing process, or you're looking to find some ways to tweak an already existing one, this could be a great resource. It brings a new approach th Note about the rating: if you find this concept interesting, snatch the book by all means. It's only a depiction of the value that I personally got with it as I've known and applied it before reading the book. I sincerely hope Mr. Ingermanson won't take it as a slight. If you're remotely interested in being a writer but don't know how to construct your writing process, or you're looking to find some ways to tweak an already existing one, this could be a great resource. It brings a new approach that's essentially a combination of two best known writing styles - plotting (or outlining) and pantsing (or seat-of-the-pants). Seat-of-the-pants is a roller coaster ride taking you from one sentence to the next. The strength is the fact that you can take your story wherever you want to and knock yourself out writing, and the weakness is that you can end up in places that don't make any sense for the story. That, and possibly painful edits. Plotting is a more sterile, lab rat approach - you take time to think out the whole plot in advance. The strength of this approach is knowing what the hell you're doing, and the weakness is that there isn't much creative leeway and you may feel constricted. You don't edit that much in this approach. Snowflake method is an attempt to bring the best out of those two worlds, presenting you with a third option - to control the flow of your story, and be creative throughout constant expansion of your story, a process similar to the formation of a snowflake (hence the name). Personally, the simplicity and the potential of this idea blew my mind when I found out about it in a blog post by the very author of this book. The expansion of that post into a whole book with a live, cartoonnetworkesque plot didn't revolutionize my understanding as it was a pretty KISS concept to begin with. I found the whole Goldilocks story dreadful in the beginning (probably because I came in with a mistake of having set expectations for a fact spewing non-fiction book), but I learned to play along with it as I got to the finish, thinking "that big bad wolf is really cool".

  13. 5 out of 5

    Clare S-B

    This book is amazing. I have never read such a fun writing book before. Sure I have read other good ones but this one was so engaging. The first more than a half is written as a novel in which the main character is being taught how to outline using the Snowflake Method. It is kind of like you as the reader are also sitting in the class and you can go off to do your homework on your story as the main character does. To give you a bit of an idea the teacher is called Baby Bear and the main charact This book is amazing. I have never read such a fun writing book before. Sure I have read other good ones but this one was so engaging. The first more than a half is written as a novel in which the main character is being taught how to outline using the Snowflake Method. It is kind of like you as the reader are also sitting in the class and you can go off to do your homework on your story as the main character does. To give you a bit of an idea the teacher is called Baby Bear and the main characters name is Goldilocks. There is a main plot line running through the book of Goldilocks wanting to write a story and a secondary plot line as well. I just wanted to keep on reading like it was a novel. And yes the Snowflake Method, has made me write some kind of outline and I managed to get up to starting step 8.... after that I'm not so sure if all I have is a mess, but it is so much better than what I had before that. And so much less of a random mess, and I know what I am doing now. It was so fun to read through and helpful too, I highly recommend you give this a go and you may even find that is it just right.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Damaskcat

    I have scribbled on and off for years and have an assortment of uncompleted novels which I have lost interest in. The idea of this book appealed to me and when I started reading it I was totally engrossed in it. The author uses fairy tale characters in a writing workshop scenario to demonstrate the ten steps of the snowflake method for planning and drafting a novel. The idea might seem a bit twee but like the famous management book about change 'Who Moved my Cheese?' stories and story book charac I have scribbled on and off for years and have an assortment of uncompleted novels which I have lost interest in. The idea of this book appealed to me and when I started reading it I was totally engrossed in it. The author uses fairy tale characters in a writing workshop scenario to demonstrate the ten steps of the snowflake method for planning and drafting a novel. The idea might seem a bit twee but like the famous management book about change 'Who Moved my Cheese?' stories and story book characters help to fix ideas in your head. Human beings are story telling creatures and telling stories makes things more memorable than a list of facts. Basically the snowflake starts with a one sentence description of your novel and builds up from that with more detailed summaries of the plot and characters right up to outlines of each scene in the book. This might seem quite dull but the writing workshop scenario really brings it to life. You could just read the chapter where the whole process is set out and work from that but you will miss a lot if you don't read the story which illustrates the process. If you've tried other methods and they haven't worked for you do give this one a try - it just might be what you're looking for. I know it has made me think more carefully about what sort of novel I want to write. Give it a try - it will only take you a few hours to get to the point of creating a detailed synopsis and you will be able to see what isn't working without having to get half way through the first draft before realising that you need to completely rewrite it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gareth

    Very clever! I read this more out of interest than actually looking for something to help me write a book, its something I'd like to have a go at one day but not now. However seeing how logical and simple the snowflake method is actually made me want to have a go at it! Yes the bears etc could annoy you I suppose, I'm a big fan of horror and space operas and didn't find the names off putting at all. Its nice to read a book with easy names rather than an author trying to come up with made up Frenc Very clever! I read this more out of interest than actually looking for something to help me write a book, its something I'd like to have a go at one day but not now. However seeing how logical and simple the snowflake method is actually made me want to have a go at it! Yes the bears etc could annoy you I suppose, I'm a big fan of horror and space operas and didn't find the names off putting at all. Its nice to read a book with easy names rather than an author trying to come up with made up French names because they think it makes them seem smarter or something. The method is broken down step by step with some very good examples and then further broken down at the end where your shown how the book you just read was written using the method. Brilliant. If you need advice on how to get moving then this book is highly recommended !

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Stieffel

    This book is a parable—a teaching mode that works brilliantly in short form but often strains credulity at book length. But Ingermanson makes this work because the story he uses to frame the lessons also demonstrates the lessons. So by the time you reach the end, you not only have the principles of the Snowflake Method, you’ve seen them applied. I appreciate that Ingermanson emphasizes that this is just one method, and a writer may find some parts useful and others not. That was the case for me; This book is a parable—a teaching mode that works brilliantly in short form but often strains credulity at book length. But Ingermanson makes this work because the story he uses to frame the lessons also demonstrates the lessons. So by the time you reach the end, you not only have the principles of the Snowflake Method, you’ve seen them applied. I appreciate that Ingermanson emphasizes that this is just one method, and a writer may find some parts useful and others not. That was the case for me; I wind up using a hybrid of this method and others. James L. Rubart does a great job of narrating the audiobook, with a variety of voices for the different characters in the story. Ingermanson doesn’t plug his app, but I will: the Snowflake Pro app allows one to easily apply these principles, and I can verify that it works on MacOS High Sierra.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paula Berinstein

    Unbelievably useful! After years of writing fiction I thought I had it all figured out but this book is making the process faster and helping me create better stories and characters. I recommend it highly!

  18. 4 out of 5

    J.M.

    A brilliant craft book presented in a rare way, framing the teaching method within an ongoing story between characters of fable (Goldilocks, Baby Bear, Big Bad Wolf and others). It’s a whodunnit AND a book about the Snowflake Method as developed by the author. I’m a pantser and it’s rough going sometimes, so I figure I’ll give this method a go on my next book! Almost five stars, just that cover*. Aside from that, gooood stuff. Highly highly recommended to fiction writers of every level. A worthy A brilliant craft book presented in a rare way, framing the teaching method within an ongoing story between characters of fable (Goldilocks, Baby Bear, Big Bad Wolf and others). It’s a whodunnit AND a book about the Snowflake Method as developed by the author. I’m a pantser and it’s rough going sometimes, so I figure I’ll give this method a go on my next book! Almost five stars, just that cover*. Aside from that, gooood stuff. Highly highly recommended to fiction writers of every level. A worthy addition to your craft library. * My gf is ridiculing me for dinging a star over the cover. Oh, and I also wondered why he had a lab coat on, then saw he’s a physicist. That part makes sense to me now because he presents the method early on using a symmetrical fractal—a snowflake.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    A fine book on how to plan out and write a fictional novel. If you're not a plotter and not a pantser there is a third alternative... the snowflake method. In a rather whimsical way the author lays out his ten step snowflake method to take your idea and turn it into a document from which can proceed to sit down and write your story. It provides an easy to follow framework to get you from start to finish. It takes a little work but by the end of the process you will have taken the guesswork and m A fine book on how to plan out and write a fictional novel. If you're not a plotter and not a pantser there is a third alternative... the snowflake method. In a rather whimsical way the author lays out his ten step snowflake method to take your idea and turn it into a document from which can proceed to sit down and write your story. It provides an easy to follow framework to get you from start to finish. It takes a little work but by the end of the process you will have taken the guesswork and mystery out of how you are going to take the idea in your head and put it down on paper. I highly recommend this book if you are like me and have difficulty with taking what's in your head and putting it into a well-planned out novel.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Serethiel Sequoia

    DNF'd for now, at 56%. I wasn't a huge fan, though this book did teach me that I'm more of a pantser than I'd thought. For plotters searching for a new outlining method, you might enjoy this one. :) DNF'd for now, at 56%. I wasn't a huge fan, though this book did teach me that I'm more of a pantser than I'd thought. For plotters searching for a new outlining method, you might enjoy this one. :)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Yana Haralanova

    Pretty helpful book. I like how is structured like fictional story and shows directly all the stuff which include the Snowflackes method. I've tryed to make outline for my novel and it was real succsess. :D Pretty helpful book. I like how is structured like fictional story and shows directly all the stuff which include the Snowflackes method. I've tryed to make outline for my novel and it was real succsess. :D

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marcel Driel

    Possible my favorite book on writing since, well ... On Writing.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Johnny

    Recommended for: Aspiring writers who have no problem dreaming up good scenes for their story, but have trouble seeing the big picture, a.k.a. Dramaticus meanderus. There's nothing wrong with the method. It is as it comes advertised- a compromise between detailed outlining and writing by the seat of your pants, between architects and gardeners. Like most systems or strategies for story-writing, one can only try it and see if it works. I give it the 3 stars not because I like the method, but becaus Recommended for: Aspiring writers who have no problem dreaming up good scenes for their story, but have trouble seeing the big picture, a.k.a. Dramaticus meanderus. There's nothing wrong with the method. It is as it comes advertised- a compromise between detailed outlining and writing by the seat of your pants, between architects and gardeners. Like most systems or strategies for story-writing, one can only try it and see if it works. I give it the 3 stars not because I like the method, but because the book was well enough put together, a good effort to give the dry nuts and bolts a little bit of lubrication. 3/5

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amelia

    I first encountered the Snowflake Method in the early 2000s, shortly after Randy Ingermanson posted it on his website. I never managed to get through more than the first three steps, but now, many years of writing later, I can see how some of the later steps would be useful. I'm definitely never going to go through them all exactly as written -- you need to customize the process a little bit to make it work, I think. The fairytale/parable framing was charming. I enjoyed the Big Bad Wolf and Robi I first encountered the Snowflake Method in the early 2000s, shortly after Randy Ingermanson posted it on his website. I never managed to get through more than the first three steps, but now, many years of writing later, I can see how some of the later steps would be useful. I'm definitely never going to go through them all exactly as written -- you need to customize the process a little bit to make it work, I think. The fairytale/parable framing was charming. I enjoyed the Big Bad Wolf and Robin Hood characters especially, and poor Old Mother Hubbard. I'm sure I know a writer or two like her!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Norma Huss

    Although I've been writing for several years, I like to read up on all kinds of writing books. I think this is quite a good book for someone beginning, partially to decide what kind of a writer one is. We've all heard there's the outliner and the pantser. This is a third way, and shows it clearly. I think I'm sort of a fourth way. There are probably as many ways to write as there are writers for each must find his or her way to satisfaction. (I guess, just like life itself.) So, while I find thi Although I've been writing for several years, I like to read up on all kinds of writing books. I think this is quite a good book for someone beginning, partially to decide what kind of a writer one is. We've all heard there's the outliner and the pantser. This is a third way, and shows it clearly. I think I'm sort of a fourth way. There are probably as many ways to write as there are writers for each must find his or her way to satisfaction. (I guess, just like life itself.) So, while I find this book quite interesting, with maybe a few ideas to borrow, I'll keep on writing my way.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tricia Mingerink

    Things I loved about this book: It is a book about writing, so non fiction. But it's also a fairy tale retelling and a murder mystery. And, somehow, that all works. Even if you aren't a plotter, every writer should read this book just to appreciate how hilarious and interesting a book on writing can be. But... I'm afraid I'm not a snowflake method writer. Sorry. Actually, I'm pretty sure my process is the snowflake method done backwards. While I have a ton of writer friends who found this book ve Things I loved about this book: It is a book about writing, so non fiction. But it's also a fairy tale retelling and a murder mystery. And, somehow, that all works. Even if you aren't a plotter, every writer should read this book just to appreciate how hilarious and interesting a book on writing can be. But... I'm afraid I'm not a snowflake method writer. Sorry. Actually, I'm pretty sure my process is the snowflake method done backwards. While I have a ton of writer friends who found this book very helpful and eye-opening, it's not for me. *shrug*

  27. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Walters

    I thoroughly enjoyed Randy Ingermanson's twist on a "how-to". The creative way in which he explains the process of planning out a story gave me a different perspective on the process and excites me to start implementing it in my own story. He doesn't make any promises that this method will work for all writers but merely offers this as another approach that may work for some. I think most writers will find value in a least one of the steps of the method. I thoroughly enjoyed Randy Ingermanson's twist on a "how-to". The creative way in which he explains the process of planning out a story gave me a different perspective on the process and excites me to start implementing it in my own story. He doesn't make any promises that this method will work for all writers but merely offers this as another approach that may work for some. I think most writers will find value in a least one of the steps of the method.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sydney Young

    I resisted buying this for awhile, but Finally took the plunge and am glad I did. I was annoyed at first that the method was demonstrated through a story, but it turned out to be an amazing vehicle, giving me a number of Ah-ha! Moments. And FYI, the last chapter explains the method and gives info for where to get the pdf so you can see it with your own eyes. Highly recommend.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tera

    The parable format is a little goofy at times, but pretty fun for a writing craft book. A short quick read with a good into to a hybrid (plotter-meets-pantser) writing approach. Best For: Beginners

  30. 4 out of 5

    Deanna

    I can totally see myself using this method for finally writing my novel!

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