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Exploit your offshore status to build a robust investment portfolio Most of the world's 200 million expats float in stormy seas. Few can contribute to their home country social programs. They're often forced to fend for themselves when they retire. The Global Expatriate's Guide to Investing is the world's only book showing expats how to build wealth overseas with index fun Exploit your offshore status to build a robust investment portfolio Most of the world's 200 million expats float in stormy seas. Few can contribute to their home country social programs. They're often forced to fend for themselves when they retire. The Global Expatriate's Guide to Investing is the world's only book showing expats how to build wealth overseas with index funds. Written by bestselling author, Andrew Hallam, it's a guide for everyone, no matter where they are from. Warren Buffett says you should buy index funds. Nobel prize winners agree. But dangers lurk. Financial advisors overseas can be hungry wolves. They don't play by the same set of rules. They would rather earn whopping commissions than follow solid financial principles. The Global Expatriate's Guide To Investing shows how to avoid these jokers. It explains how to find an honest financial advisor: one that invests with index funds instead of commission paying windfalls. You don't want an advisor? Fair enough. Hallam shows three cutting edge index fund strategies. He compares costs and services of different brokerages, whether in the U.S. or offshore. And he shows every nationality how to invest in the best products for them. Some people want stability. Some want strong growth. Others want a dash of both. This book also answers the following questions: How much money do I need to retire? How much should I be saving each month? What investments will give me both strong returns, and safety? The Global Expatriate's Guide To Investing also profiles real expats and their stories. It shows the mistakes and successes that they want others to learn from. It's a humorous book. And it demonstrates how you can make the best of your hard-earned money.


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Exploit your offshore status to build a robust investment portfolio Most of the world's 200 million expats float in stormy seas. Few can contribute to their home country social programs. They're often forced to fend for themselves when they retire. The Global Expatriate's Guide to Investing is the world's only book showing expats how to build wealth overseas with index fun Exploit your offshore status to build a robust investment portfolio Most of the world's 200 million expats float in stormy seas. Few can contribute to their home country social programs. They're often forced to fend for themselves when they retire. The Global Expatriate's Guide to Investing is the world's only book showing expats how to build wealth overseas with index funds. Written by bestselling author, Andrew Hallam, it's a guide for everyone, no matter where they are from. Warren Buffett says you should buy index funds. Nobel prize winners agree. But dangers lurk. Financial advisors overseas can be hungry wolves. They don't play by the same set of rules. They would rather earn whopping commissions than follow solid financial principles. The Global Expatriate's Guide To Investing shows how to avoid these jokers. It explains how to find an honest financial advisor: one that invests with index funds instead of commission paying windfalls. You don't want an advisor? Fair enough. Hallam shows three cutting edge index fund strategies. He compares costs and services of different brokerages, whether in the U.S. or offshore. And he shows every nationality how to invest in the best products for them. Some people want stability. Some want strong growth. Others want a dash of both. This book also answers the following questions: How much money do I need to retire? How much should I be saving each month? What investments will give me both strong returns, and safety? The Global Expatriate's Guide To Investing also profiles real expats and their stories. It shows the mistakes and successes that they want others to learn from. It's a humorous book. And it demonstrates how you can make the best of your hard-earned money.

30 review for The Global Expatriate's Guide to Investing: From Millionaire Teacher to Millionaire Expat

  1. 4 out of 5

    Florian

    I bought this book because I’m a German citizen that lived in Canada for a few years and recently moved to Ireland. Having invested some money in both Canada and Germany, I was freaking out a bit about things becoming too complicated with ties to three different countries and having to “relearn” stuff that I learned in Canada. In particular, I wanted to know if I should move all my investments with me or if I can leave them where they are and what the implications of those decisions would be. The I bought this book because I’m a German citizen that lived in Canada for a few years and recently moved to Ireland. Having invested some money in both Canada and Germany, I was freaking out a bit about things becoming too complicated with ties to three different countries and having to “relearn” stuff that I learned in Canada. In particular, I wanted to know if I should move all my investments with me or if I can leave them where they are and what the implications of those decisions would be. The book answered some of my questions for me. I didn’t learn a lot of new things but it calmed me down and reinforced some of the things I already knew. Some main take-aways for me were: - Offshore pensions for expats are a scam. Stay away from it. - Stay away from basically any kind of actively managed fund and other products that try to outperform the market. - Index investing is the way to go and sticking to the plan, rebalancing, diversification, and cold rationality are more important than trying to find the lowest fee index or the perfect exposure. - There’s important tax considerations for expats, for example if you live in a country that doesn’t tax foreign investment income and your investments are in a country that doesn’t tax capital gains for non-residents (luckily for me, Ireland and Canada seems to be such a combination). - Besides the most common “couch potato” approach to index investing (split between bonds and cap-based stock ETF), there’s some interesting variations like fundamental indexes and permanent portfolios. The differences seemed negligible to me but was interesting to learn about. - Currency hedging does more harm than good. And the market you invest in seems more important that what currency the security is being traded in. Before reading, I was considering selling my Canadian Dollar investments for Euro investments (since that’s the currency used where I currently live and of the country I might retire in). After reading this book I feel like this is less important than I initially feared. Why not five stars? - Based on the title, I expected this book to be a bit more focused on expats. I would say about 80% of the content is just about index investing in general and applies equally to non-expats. - The chapter on European expats was pretty short compared to US or Canadian. - I hoped to learn much more about things related to taxation. - It’s a bit repetitive. It helps to drive home to point but I think it could have been a bit shorter without losing that.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gábor Vészi

    I've always felt a bit bad about being a total financial noob, but never knew how to get started. My brain has a hard time processing financial text. This book is great. It is easy to understand, lays the foundation and has a clear and logical message. It's almost 5 stars for me but there were several chapters that felt a bit too detailed. I've always felt a bit bad about being a total financial noob, but never knew how to get started. My brain has a hard time processing financial text. This book is great. It is easy to understand, lays the foundation and has a clear and logical message. It's almost 5 stars for me but there were several chapters that felt a bit too detailed.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Lots of good, Vanguard-type educating about index fund investing, with some ex-pat twists.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne Michetti

    Practical, easy to understand advice and explanations for anyone living and working outside their "home" country, who wants to invest in for their future. Should be required reading! Expatriates who are investing who haven't read this are probably throwing money away. Practical, easy to understand advice and explanations for anyone living and working outside their "home" country, who wants to invest in for their future. Should be required reading! Expatriates who are investing who haven't read this are probably throwing money away.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nancy O'Hare

    This is an excellent read for those living and working abroad. Andrew Hallam is Canadian, but his book is fairly broad based. The later part dedicates individual chapters to nationalities by highlighting key tax / investing considerations relevant to individuals from those countries. Hallam highlights pitfalls to avoid and strategies towards financial freedom.

  6. 5 out of 5

    RiskingTime

    The Global Expatriate’s Guide to Investing is a book by Andrew Hallam that outlines some of the main issues expatriate investors face. I was excited when I first learned about this title because Wiley press generally does a good job with their business publications and because the author is a Canadian expatriate. I figured Hallam would bring up lots of issues that Canadian expatriates face. During my life as a financial advisor, I’ve been able to work with a few expat Canadians, but found the pr The Global Expatriate’s Guide to Investing is a book by Andrew Hallam that outlines some of the main issues expatriate investors face. I was excited when I first learned about this title because Wiley press generally does a good job with their business publications and because the author is a Canadian expatriate. I figured Hallam would bring up lots of issues that Canadian expatriates face. During my life as a financial advisor, I’ve been able to work with a few expat Canadians, but found the process of working with expats within a Canadian financial institution to be very difficult. Canadian brokerages are hemmed-in by numerous regulations that make them unwilling to deal with most expats or investors without Canadian tax addresses. The issue of where expats should hold investment accounts is covered adequately in this book. The author suggests the same choices that I’ve found during my own research. TD Waterhouse International in Luxembourg is the best choice for many expat investors. DBS in Singapore is also a good choice. Maybe many expat investors are more comfortable with their tenuous legal residency and citizenship situations than I would be, but I think the author could have provided more analysis on the choices that expat investors regarding their residency. Maybe for most expat investors, their tax residency is led by their lifestyle choice; and their tax residency isn’t a financial decision. Each investor has their own unique situation that would make tax residency a more or less important question. One of the weak points of this book is the exhaustive time the author spends on the choice between active or passive portfolio management. The topic of investment style is separate from the issues faced by the expatriate investor and I think the author should have spent much less time on this topic. Each investor has a different level of knowledge, interest, and time to spend on their portfolio investments, so a passive approach to investing is not always the best choice, although the author presents the passive investing approach as the best one. Sure, indexing and passive investing benefits many individual investors, but from my experience as a financial advisor, this fact seems obvious to an interested observer, but not to someone who has no knowledge, desire, or time to spend managing their own investment portfolio. What is a bigger challenge for those not interested in finance is how to find an advisor and platform that can do the work of managing a portfolio for them. The author does provide some resources to this point.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is a good read, with some points I have previously read elsewhere reinforced, some points I had not previously considered, and more than enough one-liners about Uncle Sam, Grim Reaper Taxman. The book offers plenty of warning to non-Americans about estate tax liability through US market investment and tips to minimize the issue (unless you are American). Less clear is anything for Americans to do but bite the bullet; which has thus far been my conclusion through my own reading and research This is a good read, with some points I have previously read elsewhere reinforced, some points I had not previously considered, and more than enough one-liners about Uncle Sam, Grim Reaper Taxman. The book offers plenty of warning to non-Americans about estate tax liability through US market investment and tips to minimize the issue (unless you are American). Less clear is anything for Americans to do but bite the bullet; which has thus far been my conclusion through my own reading and research (short of renouncing US citizenship, which is not a route I am pursuing). I realize I am asking a Canadian for US tax and estate planning knowledge - but I did appreciate the later section of the book that showed sample asset allocation for (to my memory, non-American) dual nationality couples; and wonder if at some point there could be follow up of a similar nature for American/non-American partnerships? I feel like that might be a book in it of itself, regardless of who chooses to write such a thing. As a single American teacher with nearly five years of international work experience, I suppose I still only fit part of the demographic I mention. I was glad to read that in some ways, I am mostly where I need to be in terms of retirement planning, given my current income bracket and circumstances. It can be frustrating to read savings plans geared for 3 and 4 times your income bracket. The point of "start somewhere," and "be patient" is very helpful in that regard. The variety of situations in the beginning of the book, with highly varied income and retirement goals - was great (that part included an American/non-American couple, come to think of it). I would like to see more examples like that in future works. Thanks for navigating this terrain, there is great need for it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    C. Varn

    This is a very helpful book on both pitfalls to avoid and things to invest in as a expatriate. Many of the tips here are expatriate specific, but they are extremely helpful at diversifying investments and dealing with policy and legal restrictions in your home country. It is also helpful on figuring out the kinds of savings you need to begin to invest. I huge help that this book provides is how to focus on Stock indexes and balance that out with bonds and gold holdings, and how to avoid many hig This is a very helpful book on both pitfalls to avoid and things to invest in as a expatriate. Many of the tips here are expatriate specific, but they are extremely helpful at diversifying investments and dealing with policy and legal restrictions in your home country. It is also helpful on figuring out the kinds of savings you need to begin to invest. I huge help that this book provides is how to focus on Stock indexes and balance that out with bonds and gold holdings, and how to avoid many high cost International Teacher Retirement services which are often highly parasitic on your savings possibilities. Hallum helps you learn how to self-manage retirement investments and how to look for fiscal advice. Incredibly useful.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    Overall this was an informative book but I think I only needed about 1.5 chapters of it. The beginning focused on very basic finance of stocks and bonds. I appreciated the very simple approach that was backed up by proven numbers. If you only have a bit of time, Chapter 15 is the most useful and I found it on Google Books: https://books.google.ca/books?id=BRii... Overall this was an informative book but I think I only needed about 1.5 chapters of it. The beginning focused on very basic finance of stocks and bonds. I appreciated the very simple approach that was backed up by proven numbers. If you only have a bit of time, Chapter 15 is the most useful and I found it on Google Books: https://books.google.ca/books?id=BRii...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mitesh Patel

    Having read over 70 books (several a few times), this is by far the best book (my third time) for building a low-cost investment portfolio with Index funds. The beauty is Andrew runs a blog and he provides answers to various contingent questions in a very thoughtful manner and comprehensively and yes very quickly. A must-read for any expat wanting to secure retirement.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mattias

    Great book that makes you understand why small % fees make the whole difference when you want to save for your retirement. After reading the book I created a portfolio that I intend to keep. The key is to rebalance it twice per year. The book is very easy to read and it describes the concepts in a very simple way. You don't need to be an expert in economics to understand it. Great book that makes you understand why small % fees make the whole difference when you want to save for your retirement. After reading the book I created a portfolio that I intend to keep. The key is to rebalance it twice per year. The book is very easy to read and it describes the concepts in a very simple way. You don't need to be an expert in economics to understand it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    As an expat who knew close to zilch about investing, this book really helped drill some basics into my mind. I liked the numerous clear examples and charts to illustrate all of the concepts and situations discussed. Since the material isn't the most interesting inherently, I really appreciated the author's vibrant friendly tone, and use of colorful analogies and stories. As an expat who knew close to zilch about investing, this book really helped drill some basics into my mind. I liked the numerous clear examples and charts to illustrate all of the concepts and situations discussed. Since the material isn't the most interesting inherently, I really appreciated the author's vibrant friendly tone, and use of colorful analogies and stories.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    If I could summarize this book in three words it would be "buy index funds" and in four words, "Vanguard is the best". Nearly Half of the book is dedicated to giving advice to people from certain countries so it is a fast read. If I could summarize this book in three words it would be "buy index funds" and in four words, "Vanguard is the best". Nearly Half of the book is dedicated to giving advice to people from certain countries so it is a fast read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    I'm no investing expert, so cannot give an expert opinion. But the information and advice in this book appeared very well-informed, and I would recommend this book to any expat that has money invested or is looking to invest. Has specifics related to a wide range of expat nationalities. I'm no investing expert, so cannot give an expert opinion. But the information and advice in this book appeared very well-informed, and I would recommend this book to any expat that has money invested or is looking to invest. Has specifics related to a wide range of expat nationalities.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Am much better informed and also much more terrified now having read this. Can't really rate 5 until I've become the millionaire I've been promised. Will report back in a few decades. Am much better informed and also much more terrified now having read this. Can't really rate 5 until I've become the millionaire I've been promised. Will report back in a few decades.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    Thorough, clear and, if you haven't already been swindled by one of the soulless financial "advisors" in the Middle East like I did, please read Hallam's book before you sign anything. Thorough, clear and, if you haven't already been swindled by one of the soulless financial "advisors" in the Middle East like I did, please read Hallam's book before you sign anything.

  17. 5 out of 5

    heidi

    Excellent primer for expats (and non expats) who are new to investing. I'd recommend this book to all my expat / globetrotting friends. Excellent primer for expats (and non expats) who are new to investing. I'd recommend this book to all my expat / globetrotting friends.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

    A straightforward and accessible book to global expats with their financial future.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jackie Bolen

    The best content I've seen for expat finance but not exactly for the total beginner to investing. They might want to start on some of the tutorials at Investpodia. The best content I've seen for expat finance but not exactly for the total beginner to investing. They might want to start on some of the tutorials at Investpodia.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Elin

    I am reading Benjamin Graham (intelligent investor), and Burton Malkiel (Random Walk Down Wall Street). These two classic books are heavy; lot of pages, details, contain everything and could be intimidating for some (But not me, since I am stupid on investment, so I need to upgrade my knowledge, i will read and eat any heavy classic book to save my future (and loved ones's future) - that's to tell you how determine and serious I am). But Andrew Hallam have managed to made an investment book that I am reading Benjamin Graham (intelligent investor), and Burton Malkiel (Random Walk Down Wall Street). These two classic books are heavy; lot of pages, details, contain everything and could be intimidating for some (But not me, since I am stupid on investment, so I need to upgrade my knowledge, i will read and eat any heavy classic book to save my future (and loved ones's future) - that's to tell you how determine and serious I am). But Andrew Hallam have managed to made an investment book that is NOT boring, and so relevant in all of its aspects. BTW Hallam's book, if any, have been summarizing the two classic books that i mentioned earlier, it goes hand in hand after i read them all together. At first, I was looking for a book that explaining the 'do and donts' of investment with 'Do it yourself' style, as an 'Expat'. I've read the JL Collins's book (The Simple Path to Wealth) which was good. But it was a bit too simple, too american oriented and leaving me with some questions; like 'which broker i should choose? which investment strategy? tax as non american? which one i should bought as a non-american expat', i need to save my future. Then, by a mere luck, a friend of mine had recommended me to read a blog that speaks highly about Hallam's book. With no hesitation, I rushed myself ordering the book from amazon. By far, perhaps this book is one of the best investment book (for me) that i will not shy to recommend to all of my friends. I was so happy that a friend, also an expat in Qatar, bought this book after seeing my post in social media about this sensational book. After all, I feel so lucky to come across with this book (at this age). This book will be hate by those money reapers and 'hungry sharks' out-there. So, it may not be popular, but go against it for your own shake! after all, its your hard earn saving money, we are entitle to it in every single way, we can do anything about it, but dont throw it away to some guy in fancy suit for nothing! This author is just so cunningly eloquent, explaining those complex investment principles and terms in simple way with humorous language (it makes me feel not-so-bad about myself since I am very new to investment and its sort of stuff; blame it to my engineering degree-ask me diffusion equation instead; i'll be happy to discuss it :p). There is one chapter in the book on "Most asked questions and its answer", and i was like (how the hell...Andrew Hallam read my mind and knew that I have all the same questions?! its weird huh, but it only tells how relevant this book (for me). Hallam's recommendation are directive and simple. The example portfolio along with some short story that comes with it, are so inspirational and relevant. I helped me to digest the new information and cope with it, also to narrow down different options that I find unfit. Did I just say that this book is perfect? Oh yes, it is perfect. In a sense that after reading this book (perhaps with other 3 books that I mentioned before), Now, I do feel more comfortable with my action plan and with my investment strategy. Well, comfortable is an understatement, I do feel confident that I can reach my goal 15 years down the road. I feel safe and at ease now knowing what to do!! That's to tell you how influential this book is, so be careful :) Well, I was very skeptical initially (but that is my nature on everything, perhaps after being let down by some irrelevant book, but that can be blame to my habit of finding book in random way). Let me tell you, that most of investment books are very american oriented! But hey...what a surprise that this book has a dedicated chapter for everyone; american, european, british, australian, asian, african, and so on. On top of that, it comes along with portofolio examples. Never have I ever find a great pleasure in reading an investment book that made me read through it in one go, and re read it within a week. I would like to thanks Andrew Hallam (if he read this review) for his time and for being so brave in revealing those secrets, and on top of that for saving me (and my family) from those 'sharks' that I almost got trapped with. God bless him!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Konrad

    Chapter 1: Setting Your Bull's-Eye * "Owning a whole lot of stuff means maintaining, repairing, replacing, or running it." * Rather than working, he'd rather travel, read, keep fit, and spend time with his wife. Chapter 3: The Truth about Stocks and Bonds * Although global stock markets have averaged 9% to 11%, there's a paradox. Returns landing precisely within this range aren't normal. If you're looking for a smooth 9% percent annual return from the stock market, you won't find it. Between 1926 an Chapter 1: Setting Your Bull's-Eye * "Owning a whole lot of stuff means maintaining, repairing, replacing, or running it." * Rather than working, he'd rather travel, read, keep fit, and spend time with his wife. Chapter 3: The Truth about Stocks and Bonds * Although global stock markets have averaged 9% to 11%, there's a paradox. Returns landing precisely within this range aren't normal. If you're looking for a smooth 9% percent annual return from the stock market, you won't find it. Between 1926 and 2013, U.S. stocks gained between 9 to 11% just three times. In 1968, they gained 11%; in 1993, they gained 10.1%; and in 2004, they gained 10.9%. The rest of the time, stocks soared, sank, or sputtered. Chapter 7: Self-Appointed Gurus and Neanderthal Brains * The fact is, the world's most profitable IPOs weren't storybook stocks like Microsoft or Google, but dull businesses that didn't open at silly prices. Fastenal, for example, provides building supplies. Since its 1987 IPO, which occurred a year after Microsoft's, its shares have gained about 1,000% more than Bill Gate's company. Chapter 11: Fundamental Indexing: Can We Build a Better Index Portfolio? * Usually, a country's 10 largest business go on to underperform the average stock--like big basketball players tending to become slower and less effective on the court over time. Fundamental indexes, however, are different. Their most heavily weighted stocks are rarely the largest or most popular. Instead, they're shooting above their pay scale. * PS FTSE RAFI All-World 3000 index, they launched it in December 2007. Its five-year return averaged 14.98% to December 2013. Its cap-weighted counterpart averaged 12.47%. pg 442 Chapter 14: The 16 Questions Do-It-Yourself Investors Ask * Ensure that your bond ETF comprises just first-world government or AAA-rated corporate bonds. pg 579

  22. 4 out of 5

    Leo Fischer

    Most of the investment principles in this book were pretty standard within the FI community (e.g. higher savings rates, low cost index funds), however there were some interesting tidbits for country specific investing which makes this book very relevant as an expat. This book shed light on a lot nuances related to overseas investing including witholding taxes, swap based ETFs, international brokerages which is largely glossed over by the US centric FI community.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Seán Mchugh

    Basically an expansion of his original book, but I think this time pitched at a wider audience (in the hope of garnering more sales?) and with sections practically pitched at specific nationalities. If you’re familiar with Andrew’s work, there’s nothing new here really. If you’re not, then the financial advice he gives in the book is likely to be the best you’ll ever receive.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kino

    Buku ini ngasi insight tentang opsi2 model investasi yang mempertimbangkan mobilitas, paket benefit, dan skema pensiun yang relevan buat keluarga sok ekspat kaya kami bgini. Tetep harus ngerjain peer, tapi yang penting udah ngerti koridor2 pengambilan keputusan. Highly recommended buat yang baru banget di topik ini dan butuh panduan dasar.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ric Poh Peng Wang

    Extremely simple and easy to understand book for investors interested to invest globaly

  26. 5 out of 5

    Augustinas Vee

    A great overview of various portfolio construction strategies, weighted towards the couch potato investor. Well written and understandable, with clear instructions.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mohsen

    He kept it simple and practical. Great book to get on and start.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Helen Debrah

    For someone who struggles with numbers, this book was relatively easy to follow. Comical at times and a necessary revelation. Would recommend.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Munn

    Very boring and not appropriate for my age.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

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