counter create hit Arta de a (nu) pierde timpul. Vindecă delăsarea, fii eficient. (Romanian edition) (IQ 230) - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Arta de a (nu) pierde timpul. Vindecă delăsarea, fii eficient. (Romanian edition) (IQ 230)

Availability: Ready to download

Dacă te-ai săturat să tot amâni lucrurile importante din viața ta, să cedezi tentațiilor de moment în defavoarea a ceea ce știi că trebuie să faci, să spui mereu că „de mâine“ vei face tot ce-ți propui, este obligatoriu să citești această carte. Arta de a pierde timpul, de a amâna nejustificat începerea unei acțiuni, în special din cauza neglijenței sau a lenei, se numește Dacă te-ai săturat să tot amâni lucrurile importante din viața ta, să cedezi tentațiilor de moment în defavoarea a ceea ce știi că trebuie să faci, să spui mereu că „de mâine“ vei face tot ce-ți propui, este obligatoriu să citești această carte. Arta de a pierde timpul, de a amâna nejustificat începerea unei acțiuni, în special din cauza neglijenței sau a lenei, se numește, în limbaj științific, procrastinare. Cu alte cuvinte, a procrastina înseamnă a tergiversa, a tărăgăna lucrurile, a găsi o mie de pretexte ca să nu te apuci de ceva sau ca să nu termini ceva, a amâna totul până în ultima clipă. Îți sună cunoscut? Cu toții facem asta, într-o măsură mai mică sau mai mare, indiferent de profesie sau de sex. O facem pentru că nu știm ce vrem, pentru că nu ne place, pentru că ne este lene sau, pur și simplu, pentru că nu avem chef. Iar când în jurul nostru tentațiile se înmulțesc – emisiuni interesante la televizor, prieteni noi pe Facebook, mii de site-uri web fascinante, jocuri video care dau dependență – ne este greu să renunțăm la procrastinare. La fel de banală ca gravitația, ea ne trage în jos cu aceeași putere și ne însoțește pretutindeni, îngreunându-ne viața.


Compare
Ads Banner

Dacă te-ai săturat să tot amâni lucrurile importante din viața ta, să cedezi tentațiilor de moment în defavoarea a ceea ce știi că trebuie să faci, să spui mereu că „de mâine“ vei face tot ce-ți propui, este obligatoriu să citești această carte. Arta de a pierde timpul, de a amâna nejustificat începerea unei acțiuni, în special din cauza neglijenței sau a lenei, se numește Dacă te-ai săturat să tot amâni lucrurile importante din viața ta, să cedezi tentațiilor de moment în defavoarea a ceea ce știi că trebuie să faci, să spui mereu că „de mâine“ vei face tot ce-ți propui, este obligatoriu să citești această carte. Arta de a pierde timpul, de a amâna nejustificat începerea unei acțiuni, în special din cauza neglijenței sau a lenei, se numește, în limbaj științific, procrastinare. Cu alte cuvinte, a procrastina înseamnă a tergiversa, a tărăgăna lucrurile, a găsi o mie de pretexte ca să nu te apuci de ceva sau ca să nu termini ceva, a amâna totul până în ultima clipă. Îți sună cunoscut? Cu toții facem asta, într-o măsură mai mică sau mai mare, indiferent de profesie sau de sex. O facem pentru că nu știm ce vrem, pentru că nu ne place, pentru că ne este lene sau, pur și simplu, pentru că nu avem chef. Iar când în jurul nostru tentațiile se înmulțesc – emisiuni interesante la televizor, prieteni noi pe Facebook, mii de site-uri web fascinante, jocuri video care dau dependență – ne este greu să renunțăm la procrastinare. La fel de banală ca gravitația, ea ne trage în jos cu aceeași putere și ne însoțește pretutindeni, îngreunându-ne viața.

30 review for Arta de a (nu) pierde timpul. Vindecă delăsarea, fii eficient. (Romanian edition) (IQ 230)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Oh my God do I need this book. I actually put off buying this book for a couple of weeks after seeing it in our local indie bookstore, and finally bit the bullet and bought it yesterday. Finished it today, proving one of the authors points--that we tend to dive into things that are relevant and of value to us. Once I got the book, I found it relevant and of value. The first six chapters of the book are all about the science behind the study of procrastination. It ISN'T about perfectionism--it ha Oh my God do I need this book. I actually put off buying this book for a couple of weeks after seeing it in our local indie bookstore, and finally bit the bullet and bought it yesterday. Finished it today, proving one of the authors points--that we tend to dive into things that are relevant and of value to us. Once I got the book, I found it relevant and of value. The first six chapters of the book are all about the science behind the study of procrastination. It ISN'T about perfectionism--it has a lot more to do with impulsiveness. Makes sense to me. Dr. Steel takes a lot of heady psychological stuff and makes it downright funny. Great writer, and I'm sure, if I had been fortunate enough to take a class from him at University of Calgary, where he teaches, he would be a terrific lecturer. He writes the book as if he were talking to you. Wonderful. And it definitely has its "self improvement" points. But they're backed up by his years of research, so he's not just pulling his suggestions out of his butt. I loved this book. Now, I just need to get around to putting it into practice . . .

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Would like to get to this book eventually....

  3. 5 out of 5

    Piers Steel

    With over 90% of "Good Reads" readers giving it a positive rating, it looks like I did well and, it being in the self-help category, I did good too. The ones who like it best turns out to be someone who is educated or at least appreciates that everything is scientifically backed, likes a wry sense of humour, and really wants to do something about their procrastination. They also don't hold my constructed characters, a vehicle to illustrate some techniques, to too high a literary standard; still, With over 90% of "Good Reads" readers giving it a positive rating, it looks like I did well and, it being in the self-help category, I did good too. The ones who like it best turns out to be someone who is educated or at least appreciates that everything is scientifically backed, likes a wry sense of humour, and really wants to do something about their procrastination. They also don't hold my constructed characters, a vehicle to illustrate some techniques, to too high a literary standard; still, they do seem to suffice. And if I could change anything about the book, it would be the author's note at the beginning where I try to establish my credentials and background. To some readers, it comes across as excessively self-promoting. Sorry for that; I was going for credibility. Thank you everyone for the thanks you have given me. Among the best thing I get from writing this book are the emails where people share with me how it has affected their lives. It is a nice way to start any day. PS. Probably flirting with credibility/self-promotion issue again but just got the George A Miller award for the book's research, the top award in all of psychology.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    As self-help books go, this was very scientifically documented in the "why" and "how" procrastination happens, yet loosely structured enough in the "what to do" sections to make it flexible and approachable. As a veteran procrastinator, I'd say this will be very helpful to organizations and to individuals needing to get better at getting things done. Satisfying my "red spine book" February reading challenge.

  5. 5 out of 5

    George Slade

    I'll Review This later.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    So what does it say about me that I started this book and had to return it to the library before I got to chapter 3? Okay, I finally finished this book. I think it helped that I listened to it. I really did like it, but I can't say it offered anything new or useful to me. Mostly it was a good reminder and motivator to procrastinate less. I like self help books and how they get me to reflect on how things are going. I must say, I don't think I really cared for the author's style all that much. He s So what does it say about me that I started this book and had to return it to the library before I got to chapter 3? Okay, I finally finished this book. I think it helped that I listened to it. I really did like it, but I can't say it offered anything new or useful to me. Mostly it was a good reminder and motivator to procrastinate less. I like self help books and how they get me to reflect on how things are going. I must say, I don't think I really cared for the author's style all that much. He seemed too intent on keeping me entertained. He also seemed to have a few agendas he wanted to squeeze in - like global warming - so be warned if you are sensitive to that sort of talk.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Pulkit

    I really need to curb off my habitual procrastination. And I thought this book would do it for me. How wrong I was. It starts off well by explaining what causes procrastination in psychological and evolutionary terms and I am glad to have gained that knowledge. The tendency that saved us ages ago has become risky in the modern world where we continuously need to control our urges and think on a long-term basis. Then there were a few chapters putting down the negative impact of procrastination on I really need to curb off my habitual procrastination. And I thought this book would do it for me. How wrong I was. It starts off well by explaining what causes procrastination in psychological and evolutionary terms and I am glad to have gained that knowledge. The tendency that saved us ages ago has become risky in the modern world where we continuously need to control our urges and think on a long-term basis. Then there were a few chapters putting down the negative impact of procrastination on our personal lives, on the economy and globally. I think it was pretty concise and well written. But it doesn't end there, The main reason I picked up this book was to be able to put an end to procrastination and that's where this book fails. Instead of recommending behavioral changes or concrete, specific steps to stop procrastination, it offers vague action plans, trusting the reader to follow through with them with no difficulties. That's the whole point of procrastination - we have difficulty doing things that need to be done, so how can the author, who seems to have a deep understanding of the subject, leave us to follow such non-specific instructions and magically end it all? And ironically, I put off completing this book and didn't read the entire thing. In short, I was (very) impressed by the theoretical explanations offered but gravely disappointed in the practical knowledge I so hoped this book to offer.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Liesl Shurtliff

    Hello, my name is Liesl, and I am a procrastinator. There I said it! I've been in denial for years. But it's true. I procrastinate, right along with 99% of the rest of the world. This book was interesting and helpful. I like the scientific explanations for why we procrastinate. It shed light on my own habits, made me more self-aware. He also give some great tips about how we can beat our procrastinating habits. I've been implementing many of his recommendations and am finding them very helpful.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Very good. Seriously, halfway through reading this book I had a crazy burst of productivity. The action chapters are great, the science/history chapters somewhat less interesting, especially when you are reading the book to seek help!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sortal

    I picked this up with high expectations because Dan Ariely gave it a positive review. The key ideas are worthwhile, but Steel's laboured explanations are tedious and his tone is sometimes irritatingly smug. The studies in the references sound interesting, but sadly, they're barely glossed over in the book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Azita Rassi

    I listened to the audiobook. The performance is engaging, the concepts are explained thoroughly with good examples, and the offered techniques seem to be useful and practical. Ask me in a month :-)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tomungo X

    Very cool concepts on how to stop procrastination and why we procrastination. The methods are cool because we are all slowed down by the procrastination. Once one masters to control its methods then productivity increases and goals are met.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marshall

    Fabulous book on the psychology of procrastination, and tips for how to overcome it. This book explores how we're hard-wired to procrastinate, ways modern society exacerbates the problem, and the economic costs of it. I was worried the "equation" part of it would prove to be a pseudoscientific attempt to make it sound like he's quantified procrastination. I was pleasantly surprised that it is merely a helpful tool for understanding motivation: Expectancy x Value --------------------- Impulsiveness x Fabulous book on the psychology of procrastination, and tips for how to overcome it. This book explores how we're hard-wired to procrastinate, ways modern society exacerbates the problem, and the economic costs of it. I was worried the "equation" part of it would prove to be a pseudoscientific attempt to make it sound like he's quantified procrastination. I was pleasantly surprised that it is merely a helpful tool for understanding motivation: Expectancy x Value --------------------- Impulsiveness x Delay Those four components together determine how likely we will be to act on something. Understanding this means that you can increase motivation for desired behaviors and decrease motivation for undesired behaviors by tweaking each of the variables. The rest of the book explores each of them in detail, with ideas for how each can be tweaked. The only thing I don't like about this book is that the writing is incredibly cheesy. It often reads like those lame training videos employees are forced to watch: "Meet Tom. Tom has trouble with procrastination. Time-sensitive Tom can avoid procrastinating by ..." That's silly. Drop the lifeless characters with generic names and just say what you want to say. This was forgivable until the end, when he rewards the reader with a sequel to these characters' stories, complete with their sexual escapades. Please. Seriously though, read this book if you struggle with procrastination. There's no better book for it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

    I was interested to learn that even pigeons and chimpanzees procrastinate. Somehow that makes me feel better, that I share this tendency with the entire animal kingdom. The author also points out that nobody procrastinates in every facet of their life. There is always something that we do promptly and regularly without agonizing about it. For me there are two factors: value and impulsiveness. I procrastinate about the things that I don't really value (e.g. housework). And I did learn a technique I was interested to learn that even pigeons and chimpanzees procrastinate. Somehow that makes me feel better, that I share this tendency with the entire animal kingdom. The author also points out that nobody procrastinates in every facet of their life. There is always something that we do promptly and regularly without agonizing about it. For me there are two factors: value and impulsiveness. I procrastinate about the things that I don't really value (e.g. housework). And I did learn a technique to help with that--visualization of the condition that I would like to achieve. It really does motivate me to go make the necessary changes (I've done dishes 3 nights in a row at this point). Re: impulsiveness, I know that I'm impulsive. I went into a store to buy chocolates for Christmas presents last December and emerged with chocolates AND a laptop. I am the mistress of quick decisions. Unfortunately, this means that I can be distracted from a less-than-riveting task quicker than you can say Squirrel. On the plus side, at work I have concentration skills and motivation galore. I just need to take life outside work as seriously as life at work. Was the book helpful? For me, yes. But as the author acknowledges, procrastinators may put off reading it or trying the techniques. Somehow, I think procrastination is with us for the long haul.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Having been personally shamed by the author into finishing the book, I upgraded my rating from three stars to four and my tagline from "less stupid than many self-help books" to "an intelligent self-help book." It gave me some good ideas, though I kept putting off finishing it for some reason. Ha! Procrastination joke! I recommended it to my shrink as a resource for people who want to read more about dealing with procrastination. I would read more books by the author. Actually, I'd really like to Having been personally shamed by the author into finishing the book, I upgraded my rating from three stars to four and my tagline from "less stupid than many self-help books" to "an intelligent self-help book." It gave me some good ideas, though I kept putting off finishing it for some reason. Ha! Procrastination joke! I recommended it to my shrink as a resource for people who want to read more about dealing with procrastination. I would read more books by the author. Actually, I'd really like to see what would happen if he collaborated with a shrink to write a book about the components of procrastination that are rooted in people's psychological issues with self care. What maybe made the book less relevant to me when I first took it up is the fact that my procrastination is fundamentally rooted in resentment of having to take care of myself in addition to my responsibility for taking care of others. That doesn't make the author's advice any less sensible, but it predisposed me to give up early on finishing it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Robert Sanek

    This book is a great example of what an author does when he has a unique idea that can be succinctly explained in 10-20 pages but needs to multiply that by a factor of 10 to make money writing a book. Pretty high amount of fluff (chapters 5 and 6 especially seem like they were included just to fill pages). Lots of pop-sci style references that conflate informal surveys, or even myths, with real meta-analyses. Some explanations rely heavily on bunk evolutionary psychology. If you're able to look o This book is a great example of what an author does when he has a unique idea that can be succinctly explained in 10-20 pages but needs to multiply that by a factor of 10 to make money writing a book. Pretty high amount of fluff (chapters 5 and 6 especially seem like they were included just to fill pages). Lots of pop-sci style references that conflate informal surveys, or even myths, with real meta-analyses. Some explanations rely heavily on bunk evolutionary psychology. If you're able to look over these downsides, I think that the core equation itself is a great mental model for investigating why you're putting off certain projects or tasks. If I were to come back and re-read this book, I would just read chapters 7-10, and I'd recommend first-time readers do the same thing. Indeed, even the author knows that this is where the meat of the book lies; he introduces the section with "the rest of the book is dedicated to actionable intelligence that puts putting off in its place." 3 stars because Steel wastes half the book with filler before getting to the good stuff.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kym Jackson

    Pretty good overall. The example action lists at the end are good, but each chapter should be summarised in half a page of dot point actions to be taken (given it is a self help book after all). Also it is obviously written before smart phones and streaming television and would heavily benefit from some rewriting or an additional chapter talking about these distractions. The authors’s hopes for tech to be the solution to procrastination were terribly misplaced in hindsight and an update to the b Pretty good overall. The example action lists at the end are good, but each chapter should be summarised in half a page of dot point actions to be taken (given it is a self help book after all). Also it is obviously written before smart phones and streaming television and would heavily benefit from some rewriting or an additional chapter talking about these distractions. The authors’s hopes for tech to be the solution to procrastination were terribly misplaced in hindsight and an update to the book is required. Still, the core message of impulse control is very useful. Overall: recommended.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Namista

    Read as part of a course.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gautam Ahuja

    Yup it helped

  20. 5 out of 5

    Adrian Baudy

    Great productivity book I consume productivity books. Most give a nugget of wisdom at best. But this book is the holy grail of figuring out why you aren't getting "it" done. Best part is you get evidence-based solutions with well summized action plans at the end of each section. This is my favorite book I've read this year!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Greg Kemble

    This has happened to me before (most notably with Dweck's "Mindsets"): I find it really hard to rate this book. The central concept of this book is 5-star--more useful than anything else I've read about procrastination. But I found the writing to be 1-star--tedious, especially once the central premise has been explained. I recommend reading the first chapters--just enough to understand the "equation" and, perhaps, the evolutionary basis for it. Once you've got that down, though, the rest just ta This has happened to me before (most notably with Dweck's "Mindsets"): I find it really hard to rate this book. The central concept of this book is 5-star--more useful than anything else I've read about procrastination. But I found the writing to be 1-star--tedious, especially once the central premise has been explained. I recommend reading the first chapters--just enough to understand the "equation" and, perhaps, the evolutionary basis for it. Once you've got that down, though, the rest just takes up space. At least, it did for me.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel Majeri

    This book describes procrastination, exposes it's negative effects and then provides practical tips on how to control it. The quality of the writing matches the huge amount of research put into writing it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I loved this. This was by far my favorite book on this subject which is my largest personal challenge in life. I have not researched any of his sources and the many studies the author cites, and I do not plan to, so I cannot vouch for the accuracy of his book in the sense of larger society or science. But he does reference a LOT of experts and studies in various fields including economics, sociology, psychology, biology and more. It appeared to me that this author was EXTREMELY well versed in th I loved this. This was by far my favorite book on this subject which is my largest personal challenge in life. I have not researched any of his sources and the many studies the author cites, and I do not plan to, so I cannot vouch for the accuracy of his book in the sense of larger society or science. But he does reference a LOT of experts and studies in various fields including economics, sociology, psychology, biology and more. It appeared to me that this author was EXTREMELY well versed in the subject, particularly in serious studies and scientific opinion (not just anecdotal authority from motivational gurus). But far more importantly, his version made PERFECT sense to me. It is the first one that just fit my own intuitions and allowed me to see myself in a new light. He debunks theories that I have always questioned, and he provides new approaches to understanding others which allow me to give them more credence than I had before. I think I can really gain a lot in my life if I now put into practice the practical advice he gives as well. And even if I fail to make sweeping changes, I already feel a bit happier and more at peace with myself based on this new understanding. Thanks, Mr. Steel!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ivan Vuković

    This could possibly be the best self-help book I've ever read. What makes it so great is that it isn't just a self-help book, it's a rich journey through the efforts put into understanding procrastination as a part of human nature and the results of those efforts. This is NOT your average The Guide to Perfect Life™ supported by "I promise this will help you", ancient mystical techniques or anecdotal evidence. This... is science... and Steel's integrational and inter-disciplinary approach to this su This could possibly be the best self-help book I've ever read. What makes it so great is that it isn't just a self-help book, it's a rich journey through the efforts put into understanding procrastination as a part of human nature and the results of those efforts. This is NOT your average The Guide to Perfect Life™ supported by "I promise this will help you", ancient mystical techniques or anecdotal evidence. This... is science... and Steel's integrational and inter-disciplinary approach to this subject did something I thought was impossible: It restored my faith (a little bit, at least) in social sciences! With so much sloppy work in neuroscience, psychology, economics and social sciences in general, a systematic approach such as this one really shines, worthy of calling itself scientific. Read it, the best time to do it is right now.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Russ

    It's embarrassing how long it took me to get through this book, especially given the title! It shows I started about a month ago, but it really was a couple times before that where I'd check out the book and then never get around to actually reading it. But it does have a lot of good insight and ideas on how to stop procrastination. But just like any habit it takes time to get out of the habit of procrastinating - continuing to find ways to do things NOW, in every aspect of your life definitely It's embarrassing how long it took me to get through this book, especially given the title! It shows I started about a month ago, but it really was a couple times before that where I'd check out the book and then never get around to actually reading it. But it does have a lot of good insight and ideas on how to stop procrastination. But just like any habit it takes time to get out of the habit of procrastinating - continuing to find ways to do things NOW, in every aspect of your life definitely helps. I think that making decisions to NOT do something can be powerful because otherwise it builds up the procrastination muscle - you're putting off the decision to do it or not do it. Just deciding one way or the other, even if it is deciding not to continue, is a great habit to instill in your life!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Byron Wright

    This similar to another book that I recently read on willpower. However, I much preferred the style of this book. That said, my wife read about 20 pages and was bored to tears. This book really grabbed me because the early chapters talk about the ways that we procrastinate and why. In the midst of these examples, I saw a few that described me exactly. The end of the book focuses on ways to prevent procrastination. I'm sure you will have heard of every technique listed there. However, seeing them i This similar to another book that I recently read on willpower. However, I much preferred the style of this book. That said, my wife read about 20 pages and was bored to tears. This book really grabbed me because the early chapters talk about the ways that we procrastinate and why. In the midst of these examples, I saw a few that described me exactly. The end of the book focuses on ways to prevent procrastination. I'm sure you will have heard of every technique listed there. However, seeing them in context might motivate you to implement them. In the short term, I've successfully recognized my main reason for procrastination and I've gotten a bit better about it. Whether it holds long term, I don't know, but it won't be the book's fault if I don't follow through.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell van Ineveld

    Unsurprisingly, took me two tries over the span of 14 months to finish the book, which demonstrates the extent to which I need it! This book is extremely helpful, and I highly recommend it to anyone who struggles with procrastination, dieting, saving money or any other behaviour that involves putting future needs ahead of present wants. Where this book is extremely successful is in framing procrastination in a broader context of impulsivity, and attacking it that way. The first half of book offers Unsurprisingly, took me two tries over the span of 14 months to finish the book, which demonstrates the extent to which I need it! This book is extremely helpful, and I highly recommend it to anyone who struggles with procrastination, dieting, saving money or any other behaviour that involves putting future needs ahead of present wants. Where this book is extremely successful is in framing procrastination in a broader context of impulsivity, and attacking it that way. The first half of book offers a lot of insight into why we procrastinate, How We procrastinate, and just how common and ancient a tradition it is. The second half offers useful, applicable solutions laid out using concrete examples. Exceptional work, highly recommended.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ian Burrell

    I bought this book on impulse at a train station on the commute to work. Since reading the book I have learned that impulsiveness is a cause of procrastination. The book it an interesting read, exploring the psychological, cultural and social origins and causes of procrastination. Through understanding how and why we procrastinate, with a few helpful tips, the book arms us to deal with our excessive procrastination. It's early days, and I still procrastinate, but now I know I'm procrastinating and I bought this book on impulse at a train station on the commute to work. Since reading the book I have learned that impulsiveness is a cause of procrastination. The book it an interesting read, exploring the psychological, cultural and social origins and causes of procrastination. Through understanding how and why we procrastinate, with a few helpful tips, the book arms us to deal with our excessive procrastination. It's early days, and I still procrastinate, but now I know I'm procrastinating and why I'm doing it. If you feel you are putting things off or are failing to meet your life goals, I recommend this book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Eric Montag

    I am one of the people in the world who has a problem with putting things off, and that inspired me to check out this book. There were a number of times when I read examples in the book and thought, "Oh my God, that's me!" (I am a Time-Sensitive Tom.) The author has created an equation that describes the effects of procrastination, and that equation has even been used by companies in employee and management training. It is easy to see why! It can be frustrating to find yourself in the same self- I am one of the people in the world who has a problem with putting things off, and that inspired me to check out this book. There were a number of times when I read examples in the book and thought, "Oh my God, that's me!" (I am a Time-Sensitive Tom.) The author has created an equation that describes the effects of procrastination, and that equation has even been used by companies in employee and management training. It is easy to see why! It can be frustrating to find yourself in the same self-set "trap," and the book offers some insights that are worth considering when figuring out how to break an unpleasant cycle of behavior. Overall, a pretty good read with some helpful tips.

  30. 5 out of 5

    A

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It encourages you to push yourself to stop delaying things you planned and needed to do. The book gives specific steps you can follow to overcome procrastination. Some useful advise I like from the book: * Frame your goals in specific terms so that you know precisely when you have to achieve them. * Break down long term goals into a series of short-term objectives. * Organize your goals into routines that occur regularly at the same place and time. * Frame your goals in terms of what you want to ach It encourages you to push yourself to stop delaying things you planned and needed to do. The book gives specific steps you can follow to overcome procrastination. Some useful advise I like from the book: * Frame your goals in specific terms so that you know precisely when you have to achieve them. * Break down long term goals into a series of short-term objectives. * Organize your goals into routines that occur regularly at the same place and time. * Frame your goals in terms of what you want to achieve rather than what you what you are trying to avoid.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.