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The stunning conclusion to Locus and Kitschies-nominated Madeline Ashby's Machine Dynasty trilogy. Amy's grandmother Portia finally achieves her objective of freeing the vN from their failsafe. Now freed from subservience to humanity, the vN are finally free. Amy and Portia's ongoing struggle comes to a head, fighting for the future of the Von Neumann species. File Under The stunning conclusion to Locus and Kitschies-nominated Madeline Ashby's Machine Dynasty trilogy. Amy's grandmother Portia finally achieves her objective of freeing the vN from their failsafe. Now freed from subservience to humanity, the vN are finally free. Amy and Portia's ongoing struggle comes to a head, fighting for the future of the Von Neumann species. File Under : Science Fiction [ vN3 | Island in the Streams | Failsafe No More | The Stepford Solution ]


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The stunning conclusion to Locus and Kitschies-nominated Madeline Ashby's Machine Dynasty trilogy. Amy's grandmother Portia finally achieves her objective of freeing the vN from their failsafe. Now freed from subservience to humanity, the vN are finally free. Amy and Portia's ongoing struggle comes to a head, fighting for the future of the Von Neumann species. File Under The stunning conclusion to Locus and Kitschies-nominated Madeline Ashby's Machine Dynasty trilogy. Amy's grandmother Portia finally achieves her objective of freeing the vN from their failsafe. Now freed from subservience to humanity, the vN are finally free. Amy and Portia's ongoing struggle comes to a head, fighting for the future of the Von Neumann species. File Under : Science Fiction [ vN3 | Island in the Streams | Failsafe No More | The Stepford Solution ]

30 review for reV

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rachel (TheShadesofOrange)

    4.0 Stars - Well that was worth the wait! This was a fantastic and satisfying conclusion to the Machine Dynasty trilogy. Once again, Ashby proves that she knows how to start a story with a bang! The first chapter was electrifying and I drank up every moment. Picking up after the events ID, the rest of this novel was filled with plenty of character growth and enough action to keep the plot moving along at a good pace. The author did a good job of reminding readers about the major events in the pre 4.0 Stars - Well that was worth the wait! This was a fantastic and satisfying conclusion to the Machine Dynasty trilogy. Once again, Ashby proves that she knows how to start a story with a bang! The first chapter was electrifying and I drank up every moment. Picking up after the events ID, the rest of this novel was filled with plenty of character growth and enough action to keep the plot moving along at a good pace. The author did a good job of reminding readers about the major events in the previous books for those that might need a refresher. I actually binged all three books back to back, which was a great experience. Without giving away anything, I will say that I was very satisfied with the ending to this trilogy. As someone who loves who is fascinated by artificial intelligence, I have read a lot of fiction that centres on the topic. Yet I can honestly say that I've never read anything quite like these books. Ashby's concept of synthetic life is just so different than the cliche robots we tend to imagine. The science fiction concepts in these books were fairly complex, yet well enough explained for a regular science fiction reader. I would highly recommend this series to seasoned science fiction readers looking for a unique (and a little absurd) take on artificial intelligence. Readers should start at the beginning with vN, but I highly encourage you to continue on and binge iD and reV.  Disclaimer: I received a review copy from the publisher, Angry Robot Books. 

  2. 5 out of 5

    Laura (crofteereader)

    It should be no surprise when I say that I hate villains. I do. Their narrow, selfish, predictable world-view gets very boring very quickly. The biggest handicap this book has is in choosing to have a villain be its primary point of view. Portia is the most stereotypical villain character ever - whenever she's frustrated, she kills random people / creates chaos somewhere else as kind of an afterthought, a distraction, a release. I mean, it was consistent with her character, but it got old very q It should be no surprise when I say that I hate villains. I do. Their narrow, selfish, predictable world-view gets very boring very quickly. The biggest handicap this book has is in choosing to have a villain be its primary point of view. Portia is the most stereotypical villain character ever - whenever she's frustrated, she kills random people / creates chaos somewhere else as kind of an afterthought, a distraction, a release. I mean, it was consistent with her character, but it got old very quickly. The story is also told in these weird jumping pieces, with a whole big chunk dedicated to a random flashback whose payoff is one tiny moment that gets glossed over for the sake of moving the plot forward. Also, this book contradicts several things that happened in the previous book, iD, lifting an entire "radio show" verbatim but playing it months later in a completely different context, referencing a character who was dead in the previous book and killing him again. Based on some weird interludes, part of me was guessing that this story was assembled (in-world) from pieces of data, which is why it felt so scattered, but that concept wasn't fleshed out nearly enough. {Thank you again to Angry Robot for the free copies of this series! All thoughts are my own}

  3. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Many thanks to Goodreads for an Advance Reader's Copy of this ebook. Madeline Ashby's "ReV" is a dramatic, innovative, exciting, and fitting ending to the "vN" trilogy. At the end of "iD," part two of the saga, Amy had mysteriously iterated, but "ReV" shows that the result is nothing like we might expect. Overall, the "vN" trilogy has been fantastic and intriguing, from the first "dynasty" to the final epilogue. We started with Portia and Amy and Javier in "vN." We followed the story of Javier an Many thanks to Goodreads for an Advance Reader's Copy of this ebook. Madeline Ashby's "ReV" is a dramatic, innovative, exciting, and fitting ending to the "vN" trilogy. At the end of "iD," part two of the saga, Amy had mysteriously iterated, but "ReV" shows that the result is nothing like we might expect. Overall, the "vN" trilogy has been fantastic and intriguing, from the first "dynasty" to the final epilogue. We started with Portia and Amy and Javier in "vN." We followed the story of Javier and his serial Juniors in "iD," along with Javier's quest to resurrect the love of his life. In "ReV," we get to the culmination of their stories and see the resolution of numerous questions brought up along the way. The title "ReV" has that brilliant triple meaning (kudos to the author): "revelation," "revision," and "revolution." Portia and Amy consistently trade on all three of these throughout the story. Of course, there is conflict—Portia is there, after all. The futures of both the humans and the vN are in trouble. Of course, there is innovation—Amy is there, after all. There are explicit references to cultural conceptions of "robots," from serfs and slaves throughout history, to Asimov's "quaint" modernity (Portia's word, not mine), to the postmodernity of Westworld. There are even a few sly allusions to the future of "Ghost in the Shell." The author consistently challenges the reader's preconceptions of androids with empathy, creativity, love, and the question of choice in nearly every aspect of life. Most of these concepts are persistently revised in the world of vN that the author has developed here, eventually tipping over the edge into revolution. There is a base story of religion, provided by the backstory of the vN (make sure you read "iD" if you don't know that part). The vN origin story is challenged, even overturned, by the undercurrent of evolution in Amy's life, in her choices and actions. "Rev" is Amy's revelation of what is possible for her species, her revision of both the vN themselves and their role among humanity, and a revolution in the eventual fate of the vN that her enlightenment brings about.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jay Batson

    I am sooo sad to have experienced this unfulfilling end to the trilogy. What started out as a novel immersion in the possible outcome of a “conscious robot” descended into the unrewarding imaginings of a sociopath that I (for one) did not want to read. This final book of the vN trilogy follows the trajectory of Portia’s mind, which (as we know by now) lives in the cloud. Lacking a physical body, but saddled by her constrained, human-disparaging psyche, this book is written principally from her di I am sooo sad to have experienced this unfulfilling end to the trilogy. What started out as a novel immersion in the possible outcome of a “conscious robot” descended into the unrewarding imaginings of a sociopath that I (for one) did not want to read. This final book of the vN trilogy follows the trajectory of Portia’s mind, which (as we know by now) lives in the cloud. Lacking a physical body, but saddled by her constrained, human-disparaging psyche, this book is written principally from her disturbed mind. It gives full rein to her human-bashing, her reactions, actions, judgements, her love of treating humans as ants, and her focus on eventually wiping them off the earth. Amy, her granddaughter, provides the possible path out of hades. You’ll have to read to find out if that happens. Regardless, though, this book-long descent into a sociopathic mind is depressing, unrewarding, and reading time I wish I could have back to read something I enjoyed. I did not enjoy this, despite enjoying the first two quite a lot. I just do not want to descend into a depraved mind like this.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Paul Sparks

    If ever a book was going to engender distrust with AI then its this book! I’m now wondering if I can even trust my microwave 😉 this is a very cerebral book but that is a bonus, too often we read books that are light on content and eminently forgettable, I won’t be forgetting this book I can assure you, a superb read

  6. 4 out of 5

    Annarella

    A cerebral, complex and well written book. I was fascinated by the world building and terrified by the AI. It's the first book I read by this author and won't surely be the last. Highly recommended. Many thanks to the publisher and Edelweiss for this ARC, all opinions are mine

  7. 5 out of 5

    August Bourré

    3.5

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marissa

    Disappointing. Genocidal grannybot is genocidal. Nothing much happens.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jes littleoleme

    Didn't make it this far because I could only hack 40% of the 2nd book before I shelved it....

  10. 4 out of 5

    dave wells

  11. 5 out of 5

    German (Panda) Borbolla

  12. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Herdman

  13. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  14. 4 out of 5

    Simon Cowan

  15. 4 out of 5

    David Nickle

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kellen

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  18. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  20. 4 out of 5

    Leticia

  21. 4 out of 5

    George

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ross Thompson

  23. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Owen Butler

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amy Lou

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ethan Johnson

  27. 4 out of 5

    Florence

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lewis

  29. 5 out of 5

    Max Meltser

  30. 5 out of 5

    Steven

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