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In England in the late 1920s, The Honourable Daisy Dalrymple Fletcher, on a convalescent trip to the countryside, goes to visit three old school friends in the area. The three, all unmarried, have recently bought a house together. They are a part of the generation of "superfluous women"—brought up expecting marriage and a family, but left without any prospects after more t In England in the late 1920s, The Honourable Daisy Dalrymple Fletcher, on a convalescent trip to the countryside, goes to visit three old school friends in the area. The three, all unmarried, have recently bought a house together. They are a part of the generation of "superfluous women"—brought up expecting marriage and a family, but left without any prospects after more than 700,000 British men were killed in the Great War. Daisy and her husband Alec—Detective Inspector Alec Fletcher, of Scotland Yard —go for a Sunday lunch with Daisy’s friends, where one of the women mentions a wine cellar below their house, which remains curiously locked, no key to be found. Alec offers to pick the lock, but when he opens the door, what greets them is not a cache of wine, but the stench of a long-dead body. And with that, what was a pleasant Sunday lunch has taken an unexpected turn. Now Daisy's three friends are the most obvious suspects in a murder and her husband Alec is a witness, so he can't officially take over the investigation. So before the local detective, Superintendent Crane, can officially bring charges against her friends, Daisy is determined to use all her resources (Alec) and skills to solve the mystery behind this perplexing locked-room crime.


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In England in the late 1920s, The Honourable Daisy Dalrymple Fletcher, on a convalescent trip to the countryside, goes to visit three old school friends in the area. The three, all unmarried, have recently bought a house together. They are a part of the generation of "superfluous women"—brought up expecting marriage and a family, but left without any prospects after more t In England in the late 1920s, The Honourable Daisy Dalrymple Fletcher, on a convalescent trip to the countryside, goes to visit three old school friends in the area. The three, all unmarried, have recently bought a house together. They are a part of the generation of "superfluous women"—brought up expecting marriage and a family, but left without any prospects after more than 700,000 British men were killed in the Great War. Daisy and her husband Alec—Detective Inspector Alec Fletcher, of Scotland Yard —go for a Sunday lunch with Daisy’s friends, where one of the women mentions a wine cellar below their house, which remains curiously locked, no key to be found. Alec offers to pick the lock, but when he opens the door, what greets them is not a cache of wine, but the stench of a long-dead body. And with that, what was a pleasant Sunday lunch has taken an unexpected turn. Now Daisy's three friends are the most obvious suspects in a murder and her husband Alec is a witness, so he can't officially take over the investigation. So before the local detective, Superintendent Crane, can officially bring charges against her friends, Daisy is determined to use all her resources (Alec) and skills to solve the mystery behind this perplexing locked-room crime.

30 review for Superfluous Women

  1. 5 out of 5

    Olga Godim

    An enjoyable cozy. After reading this series for 20+ books, it’s hard for me to add something new to a review. All the novels of the series have the same qualities: a charming protagonist, a low-key investigation, a small town atmosphere, and a scrupulous attention to details of day-to-day life. Maybe even too much of that, but I forgive this flaw because I like reading about Daisy and her particular approach to sleuthing. She feels like a friend I’ve known forever, comfortable and fluffy like a An enjoyable cozy. After reading this series for 20+ books, it’s hard for me to add something new to a review. All the novels of the series have the same qualities: a charming protagonist, a low-key investigation, a small town atmosphere, and a scrupulous attention to details of day-to-day life. Maybe even too much of that, but I forgive this flaw because I like reading about Daisy and her particular approach to sleuthing. She feels like a friend I’ve known forever, comfortable and fluffy like a beloved re-read. Even the fact that I guessed the murderer faster than the police didn’t detract from the simple pleasure of reading this novel. This quirk also happened in many novels of the series, and I don’t hold it against the writer. I liked the book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Damaskcat

    This is number twenty two in the Daisy Dalrymple series and I think the series is getting even better with each book. In this one Daisy is recovering from a bad attack of bronchitis at a hotel in Beaconsfield where she intends to visit an old school friend who has recently moved to the area. Her friend is one of the so-called 'superfluous women', who were unlikely to ever marry because there were almost two million more women than men in the country following the huge losses of the Great War. Wil This is number twenty two in the Daisy Dalrymple series and I think the series is getting even better with each book. In this one Daisy is recovering from a bad attack of bronchitis at a hotel in Beaconsfield where she intends to visit an old school friend who has recently moved to the area. Her friend is one of the so-called 'superfluous women', who were unlikely to ever marry because there were almost two million more women than men in the country following the huge losses of the Great War. Wilhelmina (Willie) has set up house with two friends - Vera and Isabel. She herself is an accountant and Vera is an infant teacher and Isabel runs the house and garden and does all the cooking. The arrangement seems to work well and Daisy enjoys visiting the trio for tea. So far so peaceful but then Daisy and her husband Alec, a Chief Inspector at Scotland Yard visit the friends for Sunday lunch they discover a body in the cellar. I thought the resulting story was well plotted and interesting and it does show the problems and prejudices which women faced in the nineteen twenties, many of which women still face today. Daisy is at her nosy best and Alec finds himself walking the perennial tightrope of helping the local force while trying not to antagonise them. The series can be read in any order but it is best to read them in the order in which they were published as then you can follow the development of the series characters.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    I have long enjoyed this series, and this one is no exception. Daisy is a sprig of the aristocracy, yet not at all an elitist, married to Alec, a Scotland Yard detective. This time she is recovering from a serious case of bronchitis in a small town out of the nasty London air. She manages to once more get involved in a murder mystery, through absolutely no fault of own while reuniting with an old school friend One of Dunn's strong points is her meticulous presentation of the times. It is almost p I have long enjoyed this series, and this one is no exception. Daisy is a sprig of the aristocracy, yet not at all an elitist, married to Alec, a Scotland Yard detective. This time she is recovering from a serious case of bronchitis in a small town out of the nasty London air. She manages to once more get involved in a murder mystery, through absolutely no fault of own while reuniting with an old school friend One of Dunn's strong points is her meticulous presentation of the times. It is almost painful to read of the attitudes toward women in general and single women in particular. Hard to imagine a women getting fired for the mere discovery of a body in her home. This is not really a "cosy" although there are some elements: small town England, oddball residents of same, etc., but is really more of a straightforward mystery. Thoroughly enjoyable.

  4. 4 out of 5

    ❂ Murder by Death

    This series and book are most definitely cozy, but the author does a creditable job infusing the changes and challenges of the time into the narration. The murder plotting was great - I should have seen who it was, but I didn't and I had fun watching it all come together. More wordy review: http://jenn.booklikes.com/post/120825... This series and book are most definitely cozy, but the author does a creditable job infusing the changes and challenges of the time into the narration. The murder plotting was great - I should have seen who it was, but I didn't and I had fun watching it all come together. More wordy review: http://jenn.booklikes.com/post/120825...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlyn Dunnett

    Another winner. I had never heard of superfluous women before, but it makes sense that there would be a surplus of unmarried women after World War I took so many soldiers' lives. Dunn does a great job of showing the prejudices they faced as well as portraying the warm-heartedness of other denizens of a small English village. The mystery held my interest and although I caught a vital clue early on, I discarded it when so many more likely suspects appeared on the scene. A quick, upbeat read that w Another winner. I had never heard of superfluous women before, but it makes sense that there would be a surplus of unmarried women after World War I took so many soldiers' lives. Dunn does a great job of showing the prejudices they faced as well as portraying the warm-heartedness of other denizens of a small English village. The mystery held my interest and although I caught a vital clue early on, I discarded it when so many more likely suspects appeared on the scene. A quick, upbeat read that was thoroughly enjoyable.

  6. 5 out of 5

    FangirlNation

    Daisy Fletcher goes to Beckensfield to recuperate from a bad case of bronchitis and finds herself involved in another murder in Superfluous Women by Carola Dunn. Learning that an old school chum is living at Cherry Trees House nearby, Daisy visits Willi, along with Isabel and Vera, three “spinsters” in their late 20s called “superfluous women” because with so many men killed in World War I, women suddenly outnumbered men by more than a million people who had no one to marry. When Daisy’s husband Daisy Fletcher goes to Beckensfield to recuperate from a bad case of bronchitis and finds herself involved in another murder in Superfluous Women by Carola Dunn. Learning that an old school chum is living at Cherry Trees House nearby, Daisy visits Willi, along with Isabel and Vera, three “spinsters” in their late 20s called “superfluous women” because with so many men killed in World War I, women suddenly outnumbered men by more than a million people who had no one to marry. When Daisy’s husband, Alec, a chief detective inspector from Scotland Yard, visits for the weekend, the young women, who have lived at Cherry Trees House for only two weeks, mention that they can’t get into the locked cellar. So Alec picks the lock for the women and unleashes the most foul odor as he finds a body that has lain in the cellar between two and four weeks. Read the rest of this review and other fun, geeky articles at Fangirl Nation

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    This was fun. I thought I had read a Daisy Dalrymple before, but now I don't think so. One can easily pick up here at book 22 and not feel that you are missing anything terribly. Our detectives were a little slow to come round to the guilty party; I had sussed that person out long before. But, with witty dialogue, delightful characters and suspects hiding a multitude of other secrets large and small there was enough to keep my attention.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Carole Crawford

    This is a very enjoyable book and may well be the best one yet. So many authors tend to dwindle away in creativity, oversight and interest as their series progress. However, with this latest book, being No. 22, this series is hanging steady and even coming up. I've noticed that with the last several editions. It is exceptional for that and other things. One baseline element is the rarity in this day and time of a current author managing interest, appeal and ability without the detraction of lowe This is a very enjoyable book and may well be the best one yet. So many authors tend to dwindle away in creativity, oversight and interest as their series progress. However, with this latest book, being No. 22, this series is hanging steady and even coming up. I've noticed that with the last several editions. It is exceptional for that and other things. One baseline element is the rarity in this day and time of a current author managing interest, appeal and ability without the detraction of lower order talk and behavior. This particular edition may be the tightest one yet. Her descriptions of food, clothes, buildings, terrain and the like are incorporated well and thus most welcome, along with personality nuances and variances. There is a pleasant and personable flow with an interesting storyline. It helps when you like the focus characters, which I did here, being the housemates. Some of the old regulars were well woven in. The supporting characters also had their varying shades of interest, like the rector, his wife and the doctor's wife, certainly the maid at the inn and others. Even the bit parts had interest, when they could easily have been just black and white outlines. The boot boy, the inn manager, even the station master all had some shading given them. I would deem that an element of good writing. For me, there were no annoyances or negatives. I have had an issue in the past with a particular handling or two, but not with this book. I find it balanced and well done. Another competent feature is the author keeping track of who her main characters are, where they've been and bringing them along with consistency. Somehow, many other current authors seem to have trouble in that area as they go along - perhaps too many series going. There was no trouble recognizing Daisy, yet she is maturing and changing in her life. The "meddling" designation given her detecting was there, but not so rampant as before. And husband Alec's reactions to it are less jarring from what they have been in the past. It is set in the 1920's after all, and the world that was then was not exactly ready for a female with Daisy's particular penchant. This is a very good edition in what is now a remarkably solid series. Thank you, Ms. Dunn.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Grey853

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It's England in the 1920, right after the great war. London's air quality is horrible and Daisy Dalrymple Fletcher has a serious case of bronchitis. She goes on a trip to the countryside to recover. There also happens to be an old school chum recently moved to the area. Her friend lives with two other single women, all referred to as "superfluous women". During this time in England there aren't enough men to go round since so many were killed in the war. The prospects of any of the three marryin It's England in the 1920, right after the great war. London's air quality is horrible and Daisy Dalrymple Fletcher has a serious case of bronchitis. She goes on a trip to the countryside to recover. There also happens to be an old school chum recently moved to the area. Her friend lives with two other single women, all referred to as "superfluous women". During this time in England there aren't enough men to go round since so many were killed in the war. The prospects of any of the three marrying or having children is quite limited. There's a lot of prejudice against them in the village. They're considered suspect because they live outside the "norm". When Daisy feels well enough, she does visit her friend and meets the housemates. When her husband, Detective Inspector Alec Fletcher, comes down to bring her home, they're invited by the friend to Sunday lunch before leaving. While there, one of the ladies asks Alec about trying to open the locked wine cellar. They never got a key when they bought the house. When he does, they find a decomposed body. The stink permeates everything, as does the suspicion against the women from that point on. It's up to Daisy and Alec to find the real killer. As usual the book is more about the characters than the actual mystery. Dunn is a master of creating characters, people you come to care about because Daisy does. This is another good, solid addition to the series.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    One of my very favorite series with 22 books and still going strong. The writing, the history, the story, the well developed characters, and the descriptive techniques of people, places, and things are top notch. Looking forward to #23

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kav

    Sigh -- I've read the whole series now and I will miss Daisy and Alec and the gang. Might have to re-listen from the beginning. Superfluous Women is all that I love about this series. The mystery starts off early on -- Daisy and Alec are together most of the story -- Tom and Ernie arrive in a timely manner -- ton's of red herrings -- engaging secondary characters -- the twenties time period. In fact, this notion of superfluous women was so interesting and a great angle to add to the mix. Somethi Sigh -- I've read the whole series now and I will miss Daisy and Alec and the gang. Might have to re-listen from the beginning. Superfluous Women is all that I love about this series. The mystery starts off early on -- Daisy and Alec are together most of the story -- Tom and Ernie arrive in a timely manner -- ton's of red herrings -- engaging secondary characters -- the twenties time period. In fact, this notion of superfluous women was so interesting and a great angle to add to the mix. Something I never gave a lot of thought to after the first World War. So many young women left without potential husbands in an era where a female left her father's home for her husbands. All in all a wonderful series -- just two books out of twenty-three that I wasn't over-the-moon with. And the audible version is sublimely narrated.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ann aka Iftcan

    Having done a couple of papers in College on this topic I found this particular book extremely interesting. Ms. Dunn did an excellent job of trying to make the modern reader understand what the young women of those years between the war faced with many of the men that they would have married dead or suffering from the serious after effects of what was, until that time, the nastiest and largest war experienced by the human species. Not only had they lost brothers, husbands and lovers, but they wer Having done a couple of papers in College on this topic I found this particular book extremely interesting. Ms. Dunn did an excellent job of trying to make the modern reader understand what the young women of those years between the war faced with many of the men that they would have married dead or suffering from the serious after effects of what was, until that time, the nastiest and largest war experienced by the human species. Not only had they lost brothers, husbands and lovers, but they were now looked down upon because they could not marry. This book is about a group of those young women and their effort to, "Keep their chins up and get on with it." Where "it" is their lives. Perhaps because of my knowledge of this time, this is one of my favourite of the Daisy books.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kam

    3.5 stars. Entertaining but took an age to get to the end.

  14. 4 out of 5

    CatBookMom

    I like nearly all of the books in this series, and *Superfluous Women* is one of the best. Something like 2 million British men were killed or very seriously wounded/maimed in WWI. Accordingly, a million or more British women had no hope of marriage, and the press, politicians, etc., labeled them "superfluous women". Women who had taken on men's jobs during the war, women who were still working in jobs that wouldn't have been available to them before the war, all of them still being disregarded, I like nearly all of the books in this series, and *Superfluous Women* is one of the best. Something like 2 million British men were killed or very seriously wounded/maimed in WWI. Accordingly, a million or more British women had no hope of marriage, and the press, politicians, etc., labeled them "superfluous women". Women who had taken on men's jobs during the war, women who were still working in jobs that wouldn't have been available to them before the war, all of them still being disregarded, sneered at, by the men who had to make themselves feel superior. (Any of this sound familiar in 2019???) OK, off the soapbox. Daisy and Alec have some great interactions in this story, Alec meets and works with a really competent Inspector, and of course they solve a truly puzzling mystery. As a side note, one of the characters is the first female chartered accountant (CPA, for the USians; my former occupation), who helps to uncover fraud and embezzlement.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    A very strong entry in the series. While recovering from Bronchitis in a small town north of London, Daisy and Alec stumble across a body locked in the cellar of the house three of Daisy's friends have just bought. Who is the dead woman, how did she die, and how did she end up in this cellar? Could one of the "superfluous women" actually be a killer, unlikely as that seems? As usual with Dunn, the story is gracefully told and the characters are sympathetic. Highly recommended to all lovers of cla A very strong entry in the series. While recovering from Bronchitis in a small town north of London, Daisy and Alec stumble across a body locked in the cellar of the house three of Daisy's friends have just bought. Who is the dead woman, how did she die, and how did she end up in this cellar? Could one of the "superfluous women" actually be a killer, unlikely as that seems? As usual with Dunn, the story is gracefully told and the characters are sympathetic. Highly recommended to all lovers of classic cozy English mysteries.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Reynolds

    The most recently released "Daisy" book. I loved it. I had been reading all the books one right after the other, but had to WAIT for this one to get published. I hated having to wait - but LOVED the chance to have another fun read with Daisy and Alec. It was another fun and interesting story. Number 22 - and now... ... I'll have to wait AGAIN. But I am sure it will be worth the wait. Daisy is just as wonderful as ever in Superfluous Women.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sallee

    I love the time line of these mysteries and enjoy the English characters in the story. English village life at that time moved with a slower and more gentle pace and people had manners. The murders were just as gruesome as today's are but methods of detecting slowed the pace of the investigation unlike with today's forensics where answers appear sooner. Reading about how the police go about sleuthing is entertaining and makes for a nice read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Verity W

    I've been saving this for when I needed a treat - and this was great. Daisy is so engaging and I love the dynamic between her and Alec. I like the premise of this book - the Superfluous Women issue was a big one at the time - and at the start of the series Daisy faced being one herself and has more empathy with the group of women than a lot of the other people who they encounter

  19. 5 out of 5

    Selah Pike

    22 books in and these stories are still consistently good! I love the characters (both the recurring and the new), the historical details (well researched but not dancing around waving "look at me, I'm historical!"), and the plots (deliciously full of red herrings).

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lcitera

    Number 22 in the series and delightful. Nancy Drew for adults.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn

    I usually love cozy mysteries but this one never grabbed my attention. 2.5 stars. I love the cover though and I love learning about 'superfluous' women.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Eva Müller

    This review can also be found on my blog “Sorry but one simply can’t turn off one’s brain!” Underwood heaved a deep sigh. “No, I suppose it’s too much to expect of the modern woman.” This is book number 22 in this series. I’ve read the previous 21 books in the series and intend to read number 23 once it comes out. I could simply stop here. After all, I can’t say that about many series. And even fewer if you ask which of those I genuinely enjoy and don’t only continue reading because I’ve grown so This review can also be found on my blog “Sorry but one simply can’t turn off one’s brain!” Underwood heaved a deep sigh. “No, I suppose it’s too much to expect of the modern woman.” This is book number 22 in this series. I’ve read the previous 21 books in the series and intend to read number 23 once it comes out. I could simply stop here. After all, I can’t say that about many series. And even fewer if you ask which of those I genuinely enjoy and don’t only continue reading because I’ve grown so fond of the characters, that I’ll follow them through the shittiest plots. Carola Dunn has managed to keep the quality of this series steady for a long time and that deserves applause. It also means I have run out of things to say. Daisy and Alec’s relationship is still refreshingly drama-free. The new characters are still charming. (I really wouldn’t mind ifWillie and the others they turned into recurring characters as some others have done). Now some of the ‘evil’ characters had less depth than those in previous books but they still didn’t turn into caricatures. That leaves me with the mystery plot. Which was great. Now I’ve read a lot of mystery novels. I often figure out the killer long before the characters do and not necessarily because the book is badly written. I just know what I have to look for and what hints disguise themselves as unimportant. Only, this time, I figured the killer out only a few pages before Daisy did it. I was distracted by some very well done red herrings and something stopped me from suspecting that character earlier. The exact same thing that stopped Daisy and the others from suspecting them. Saying more would be a spoiler but It was very well done. On to the next 22 books 😉

  23. 4 out of 5

    Marty

    This is #22 in the series about Daisy … a feisty lady who is not afraid to use her brains and get involved --- even though it is the 1920s in England where “ladies” definitely should know their place! … A problem was that so many of the young men had been killed in the recent war (WWI) that there were many “superfluous women” who were single because their husbands/sweethearts/etc. were no longer alive. These women had to break into areas that were traditionally “all male.” Daisy was lucky enough This is #22 in the series about Daisy … a feisty lady who is not afraid to use her brains and get involved --- even though it is the 1920s in England where “ladies” definitely should know their place! … A problem was that so many of the young men had been killed in the recent war (WWI) that there were many “superfluous women” who were single because their husbands/sweethearts/etc. were no longer alive. These women had to break into areas that were traditionally “all male.” Daisy was lucky enough not only to have the nerve to help solve crimes, but met some men who admired that trait – even married one: a Chief Inspector for Scotland Yard. … Daisy had been ill, and was ordered by her doctor to get out of London to where the air was cleaner. Her old college chum had just moved to such a place, not far from London,– buying a house along with two other “superfluous women.” She would go for a visit, but stay in a nearby hotel so her husband could come down from London easily. Unfortunately, the house came with a dead body in the wine cellar. Was this the previous owner? Because the body had been locked in the cellar, it was most definitely murder --- but who? Why? Daisy’s hubby was not officially on the case, but was allowed to “help” if necessary… but of course, Daisy had to get involved also. A good historical mystery - Great for Downton Abbey fans.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Daisy Dalrymple is recovering from a bad case of bronchitis, and seeks refuge from London pollution in the town of Beaconsfield, where an old school friend named Willie has taken up residence with two other "superfluous women"--women unlikely to marry because WWI took so many men's lives. When Daisy's Scotland Yard husband Alec joins her and they go to Willie's house for dinner, Alec rather accidentally discovers a corpse in their cellar--a long-dead corpse whose stench drives the women out to D Daisy Dalrymple is recovering from a bad case of bronchitis, and seeks refuge from London pollution in the town of Beaconsfield, where an old school friend named Willie has taken up residence with two other "superfluous women"--women unlikely to marry because WWI took so many men's lives. When Daisy's Scotland Yard husband Alec joins her and they go to Willie's house for dinner, Alec rather accidentally discovers a corpse in their cellar--a long-dead corpse whose stench drives the women out to Daisy's hotel. It was murder for sure, and Alec gets seconded to helping the local inspector, who is willing to have him. Of course, Daisy also investigates, and there is no shortage of people who might have wanted to murder the house's former owner--if that's indeed who it is. I love this series; Daisy is so cheerful and brave and a bit hapless, and doesn't deserve all the male sighs of forbearance when she has clues for them (you think they would have learned by now). I thought this one was a little message-y about the "superfluous women" and also sexual harassment in the workplace, so that could have been done with a lighter touch. I did figure out who the murderer was long before Daisy did, but it didn't really matter because I just enjoy the frothy tone of these so much. And I suspect the author is giving us clues that the twins will not be Daisy's only offspring...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Deb Whittam

    Those who have read my previous reviews will know that I recently read Carola Dunn’s Corpse at the Crystal Palace and though I enjoyed it, I found it a bit tedious in the beginning and had my doubts about reading any more in the series. Well I am pleased to say that I really enjoyed Superfluous Women, it was a traditional murder mystery but in this instance it didn’t drag its heels but was zipping along from the very first page. Perhaps my change in view is due to reading a previous book but I th Those who have read my previous reviews will know that I recently read Carola Dunn’s Corpse at the Crystal Palace and though I enjoyed it, I found it a bit tedious in the beginning and had my doubts about reading any more in the series. Well I am pleased to say that I really enjoyed Superfluous Women, it was a traditional murder mystery but in this instance it didn’t drag its heels but was zipping along from the very first page. Perhaps my change in view is due to reading a previous book but I think it can be attributed most to the fact that we were not just reliant on Daisy as our means of solving the case. Other characters, who were well developed and unique, took us along for the ride and this allowed us, as the readers, to come to our own conclusions about what has occurred. It really enjoy this is murder mysteries as I am one of those page turning sleuths who develops my own theories as I read. While I would say this wouldn’t be everyone’s cup of tea I would recommend it for a lazy afternoon in the sun or in Australia, a wet afternoon in front of the fire. It is a relaxing, enjoyable and entertaining read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gordon

    This book along with all the divine Daisy's mysteries is filled with positive and delightful absence of pain. One is thrust into a world of the upper middle class with a denizen from the upper class, Daisy Dalrymple, who has shockingly modern ideas (she talks to servants and her step-daughter and has a job that pays money), but is so reassuringly decent that we seem to be thousands of years distant from the conflicted world of Breaking Bad or the Sopranos. This edition allows us to see the depth This book along with all the divine Daisy's mysteries is filled with positive and delightful absence of pain. One is thrust into a world of the upper middle class with a denizen from the upper class, Daisy Dalrymple, who has shockingly modern ideas (she talks to servants and her step-daughter and has a job that pays money), but is so reassuringly decent that we seem to be thousands of years distant from the conflicted world of Breaking Bad or the Sopranos. This edition allows us to see the depth of loss and sorrow that England had to go through. What do you do with a nation that has lost hundreds of thousands of young men? What do you do with "superfluous women"? It's a question I never thought to ask until I followed Daisy into a small town as she and her husband are terrified by her cold. We are reminded that the flu had killed millions in the world. We are also reminded that women were left to their own devices by the predations of WWI. The ugliness doesn't overwhelm our heroine, but we're reminded that it's there. Don't worry, Daisy wins. But still.

  27. 4 out of 5

    George

    #22 in the Honorable Daisy Dalrymple (and her husband Scotland Yard Detective chief Inspector Alec Fletcher), magazine writer and heiress (no inheritance due to British entailed system) mystery series. It is October, 1927 with Daisy recuperating from severe bronchitis in the country and Alec joins her for the weekend and a luncheon with 3 of Daisy’s school friends. The friends have bought a home together. As a result of the causalities from WW I, there were 2 million more women than men in Brita #22 in the Honorable Daisy Dalrymple (and her husband Scotland Yard Detective chief Inspector Alec Fletcher), magazine writer and heiress (no inheritance due to British entailed system) mystery series. It is October, 1927 with Daisy recuperating from severe bronchitis in the country and Alec joins her for the weekend and a luncheon with 3 of Daisy’s school friends. The friends have bought a home together. As a result of the causalities from WW I, there were 2 million more women than men in Britain after the war. The press referred to these women as “superfluous” or “surplus.” Daisy’s school friends are in this group. It is not long before a body is discovered and Alec is involved in another murder investigation. The plight of “superfluous” or “surplus” women plays an important role in this story. Again, a good cast of supporting characters who Dunn develops very well and snappy dialog.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    A nice summer mystery: entertaining, only one murder and that takes place offstage and I did not figure out who "done it" before it was revealed. Thus satisfying, if not exactly outstanding. I picked this off the new book shelf at the public library because I recognized "superfluous women." That term is both a definitive and derogatory reference to the approximately 2 million women who outnumbered men in the years after WWI in the UK. Their story is told in a non-fiction form in "Singled Out" by A nice summer mystery: entertaining, only one murder and that takes place offstage and I did not figure out who "done it" before it was revealed. Thus satisfying, if not exactly outstanding. I picked this off the new book shelf at the public library because I recognized "superfluous women." That term is both a definitive and derogatory reference to the approximately 2 million women who outnumbered men in the years after WWI in the UK. Their story is told in a non-fiction form in "Singled Out" by Virginia Nicholson. In fact, Carola Dunn was inspired by that book to create her trio of single women living together in Britain in the 1920s who are the protagonists of this mystery. A fun and lightweight intro to this topic but Nicholson's book is the one to read if the subject is of real interest to you.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Ann

    While recuperating from bronchitis away from the air pollution in London, Daisy is invited to visit a friend living in the same town. Both she & Alec are invited for lunch, when a terrible stench is noted coming from the wine cellar.... The stench could only mean one thing... a dead body; that of an unidentified woman, not too decomposed, but enough to not be recognizable. Meanwhile the woman who sold the house where the body was found has gone missing from her trip to St Tropez. There are no lacki While recuperating from bronchitis away from the air pollution in London, Daisy is invited to visit a friend living in the same town. Both she & Alec are invited for lunch, when a terrible stench is noted coming from the wine cellar.... The stench could only mean one thing... a dead body; that of an unidentified woman, not too decomposed, but enough to not be recognizable. Meanwhile the woman who sold the house where the body was found has gone missing from her trip to St Tropez. There are no lacking for suspects: the women who purchased & now live in the house, the schoolmaster who makes unwanted advances to women, the missing woman's boyfriend, the boyfriend's wife, and the missing woman's step-son. Of course Daisy is able to provide important information to the police that they have missed....

  30. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    Visiting her friend while recovering from bronchitis in a hotel in a village away from the smog of London, Daisy and Alec decide to help the women gain access to a locked basement that no one has a key to, and they haven't been able to access it since buying the house. Alec picks the lock and discovers a long-dead and rotting corpse. At least this time, Alec can't blame her for finding the body! Following several red herrings leads the police on a complicated investigation, and in the end it's D Visiting her friend while recovering from bronchitis in a hotel in a village away from the smog of London, Daisy and Alec decide to help the women gain access to a locked basement that no one has a key to, and they haven't been able to access it since buying the house. Alec picks the lock and discovers a long-dead and rotting corpse. At least this time, Alec can't blame her for finding the body! Following several red herrings leads the police on a complicated investigation, and in the end it's Daisy to works out a theory of who the murderer is. Along the way, a couple of budding romances start to blossom. I hope the author fleshes them out in the next (and last) book in this series. Even though I figured out who the killer was almost immediately, this was still a good read, and I pretty much enjoyed it.

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