counter create hit How to Read Chinese Poetry: A Guided Anthology - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

How to Read Chinese Poetry: A Guided Anthology

Availability: Ready to download

In this "guided" anthology, experts lead students through the major genres and eras of Chinese poetry from antiquity to the modern time. The volume is divided into 6 chronological sections and features more than 140 examples of the best shi, sao, fu, ci, and qu poems. A comprehensive introduction and extensive thematic table of contents highlight the thematic, formal, and In this "guided" anthology, experts lead students through the major genres and eras of Chinese poetry from antiquity to the modern time. The volume is divided into 6 chronological sections and features more than 140 examples of the best shi, sao, fu, ci, and qu poems. A comprehensive introduction and extensive thematic table of contents highlight the thematic, formal, and prosodic features of Chinese poetry, and each chapter is written by a scholar who specializes in a particular period or genre. Poems are presented in Chinese and English and are accompanied by a tone-marked romanized version, an explanation of Chinese linguistic and poetic conventions, and recommended reading strategies. Sound recordings of the poems are available online free of charge. These unique features facilitate an intense engagement with Chinese poetical texts and help the reader derive aesthetic pleasure and insight from these works as one could from the original. The companion volume How to Read Chinese Poetry Workbook presents 100 famous poems (56 are new selections) in Chinese, English, and romanization, accompanied by prose translation, textual notes, commentaries, and recordings. Contributors: Robert Ashmore (Univ. of California, Berkeley); Zong-qi Cai; Charles Egan (San Francisco State); Ronald Egan (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara); Grace Fong (McGill); David R. Knechtges (Univ. of Washington); Xinda Lian (Denison); Shuen-fu Lin (Univ. of Michigan); William H. Nienhauser Jr. (Univ. of Wisconsin); Maija Bell Samei; Jui-lung Su (National Univ. of Singapore); Wendy Swartz (Columbia); Xiaofei Tian (Harvard); Paula Varsano (Univ. of California, Berkeley); Fusheng Wu (Univ. of Utah)


Compare

In this "guided" anthology, experts lead students through the major genres and eras of Chinese poetry from antiquity to the modern time. The volume is divided into 6 chronological sections and features more than 140 examples of the best shi, sao, fu, ci, and qu poems. A comprehensive introduction and extensive thematic table of contents highlight the thematic, formal, and In this "guided" anthology, experts lead students through the major genres and eras of Chinese poetry from antiquity to the modern time. The volume is divided into 6 chronological sections and features more than 140 examples of the best shi, sao, fu, ci, and qu poems. A comprehensive introduction and extensive thematic table of contents highlight the thematic, formal, and prosodic features of Chinese poetry, and each chapter is written by a scholar who specializes in a particular period or genre. Poems are presented in Chinese and English and are accompanied by a tone-marked romanized version, an explanation of Chinese linguistic and poetic conventions, and recommended reading strategies. Sound recordings of the poems are available online free of charge. These unique features facilitate an intense engagement with Chinese poetical texts and help the reader derive aesthetic pleasure and insight from these works as one could from the original. The companion volume How to Read Chinese Poetry Workbook presents 100 famous poems (56 are new selections) in Chinese, English, and romanization, accompanied by prose translation, textual notes, commentaries, and recordings. Contributors: Robert Ashmore (Univ. of California, Berkeley); Zong-qi Cai; Charles Egan (San Francisco State); Ronald Egan (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara); Grace Fong (McGill); David R. Knechtges (Univ. of Washington); Xinda Lian (Denison); Shuen-fu Lin (Univ. of Michigan); William H. Nienhauser Jr. (Univ. of Wisconsin); Maija Bell Samei; Jui-lung Su (National Univ. of Singapore); Wendy Swartz (Columbia); Xiaofei Tian (Harvard); Paula Varsano (Univ. of California, Berkeley); Fusheng Wu (Univ. of Utah)

30 review for How to Read Chinese Poetry: A Guided Anthology

  1. 5 out of 5

    Oliver Ho

    An interesting book but I think it might be aimed more at students of Chinese language and literature, rather than a layperson like me. It felt quite academic at times, and was a bit of a slog to get through. Regardless, it's still a good introduction to classical Chinese poetry and it offers insights into the historical contexts, development and interpretation of the poems. In particular, I appreciated the word-for-word translations that accompanied most of the poems, along with a more standard An interesting book but I think it might be aimed more at students of Chinese language and literature, rather than a layperson like me. It felt quite academic at times, and was a bit of a slog to get through. Regardless, it's still a good introduction to classical Chinese poetry and it offers insights into the historical contexts, development and interpretation of the poems. In particular, I appreciated the word-for-word translations that accompanied most of the poems, along with a more standard translation. These showed the difficulty of translation, and led me to another book I would like to read, called, "19 Ways of Looking at Wang Wei," which takes a short poem and demonstrates how it can be interpreted and translated at least 19 different ways. I will probably dip into this anthology again from time to time.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stan Murai

    Since I have a working knowledge of Chinese and Japanese, I used to compare the original Chinese text to the translation of any Chinese poetry that I was reading. I often felt something was lacking in the translation since the sources for the Chinese texts were generally included accompanying aids, like annotations, commentaries, background information on the poem and author, plus a paraphrase in modern Chinese or Japanese. Most Chinese or Japanese collections of Chinese poems are like the well- Since I have a working knowledge of Chinese and Japanese, I used to compare the original Chinese text to the translation of any Chinese poetry that I was reading. I often felt something was lacking in the translation since the sources for the Chinese texts were generally included accompanying aids, like annotations, commentaries, background information on the poem and author, plus a paraphrase in modern Chinese or Japanese. Most Chinese or Japanese collections of Chinese poems are like the well-known study aids Cliff Notes with all kinds of helpful information for understanding poems. This "guided" anthology, edited by Professor Zong-Qi Cai is a collection of essays by experts who guide students through the major genres and eras of Chinese poetry from ancient to relatively the modern times. The book is divided into 6 chronological sections and includes more than 140 examples of the best poems in various styles (shi, sao, fu, ci, and qu poems). It is a comprehensive introduction to the thematic, formal, and prosodic features of Chinese poetry. Each chapter is written by a scholar with a specialty in a particular period or genre. The poems are presented in Chinese and English, accompanied by a tone-marked romanized version with an explanation of Chinese linguistic and poetic conventions, and recommended strategies for reading the poems. Sound recordings of the poems are available online free of charge. This book fulfills a real need for tools to understand the Chinese poetic tradition. The kind of information accompanying each poem is much like the notes that appear in Chinese and Japanese anthologies of poems. It also helps dispel certain myths about Chinese poetry and the written language that are commonly held because of Ezra Pound and Ernest Fenollosa, who lacked any real knowledge of Chinese in spite of the success of their translations. They were impressed by features such as the iconicity of the ideograms which are really only a very small part of the written language and have little effect on the production of the actual poems.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Blake Brownrigg

    For someone who has tried to approach Chinese poetry through sluggish and posturing academic works (Stephen Owen, no offence), this volume is a nice departure from all that. It is written with purpose and clarity, never assuming the reader knows obscure poetic terminology or needs to hear about poetry through overly-poetic language. It looks at the social, the historical, the philosophical, the grammatical and stylistic parts of each poem, poet, and poetic movement. Especially helpful is the int For someone who has tried to approach Chinese poetry through sluggish and posturing academic works (Stephen Owen, no offence), this volume is a nice departure from all that. It is written with purpose and clarity, never assuming the reader knows obscure poetic terminology or needs to hear about poetry through overly-poetic language. It looks at the social, the historical, the philosophical, the grammatical and stylistic parts of each poem, poet, and poetic movement. Especially helpful is the introduction, an overview of the history of Chinese poetry with some discussion of the major forms and themes.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jared

    If you've been reading lots of Classical Chinese Poetry in translation (as I have) this book is totally fascinating, and gives you a comprehensive technical understanding of forms and genres. If you're into technique, this'll really change the way you think about, for example, how syntactic parallelism can create relationships in a pretty non-metaphoric way. Also really helps you understand the challenges of translation, helps you read translations with a clearer sense of how the original forms If you've been reading lots of Classical Chinese Poetry in translation (as I have) this book is totally fascinating, and gives you a comprehensive technical understanding of forms and genres. If you're into technique, this'll really change the way you think about, for example, how syntactic parallelism can create relationships in a pretty non-metaphoric way. Also really helps you understand the challenges of translation, helps you read translations with a clearer sense of how the original forms operate (and are pretty difficult to translate literally). It's totally technical!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Anders

    Extremely thorough in breadth and depth, and an excellent place to start for those wishing to work towards an understanding of this mind-bogglingly rich subject. As it can be highly technical at times, and unavoidably caters to those with some Chinese ability, it works best either as a slow, careful read-through taking notes or as a multilayered reference source for historical background, verse technique and cultural reference points not readily apparent to the untrained barbarian.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michael Pratt

    This volume is an essential reference for any student of Chinese--or simply any poetry lover--interested in how Chinese verse works. The recordings of the anthologized poems which can be downloaded for free from the publisher's website are an added benefit. I cannot recommend this marvelous and enlightening book too strongly. This volume is an essential reference for any student of Chinese--or simply any poetry lover--interested in how Chinese verse works. The recordings of the anthologized poems which can be downloaded for free from the publisher's website are an added benefit. I cannot recommend this marvelous and enlightening book too strongly.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ian Turek

  8. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lhamo

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lucas

  11. 4 out of 5

    Samodh

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Brown

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dr. William J. Smith

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ruyu

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ebenezer Brittlebank

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dan Hedley

  18. 5 out of 5

    Philip

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dallin Abendroth

  20. 4 out of 5

    Peter Woods

  21. 4 out of 5

    Taiwei Wang

  22. 4 out of 5

    Daniela Gonzalez

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steven Severance

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jon

  25. 4 out of 5

    Grahame Anderson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Carol

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mauricio Santoro

  29. 4 out of 5

    Delan

  30. 5 out of 5

    Helena Jonsson

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.