counter create hit This Longing: Poetry, Teaching Stories, and Letters - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

This Longing: Poetry, Teaching Stories, and Letters

Availability: Ready to download

This Rumi collection features selections from one of the world's great spiritual masterpieces, the Mathnawi. The Mathnawi consists of six volumes of poetry in rhyme—over fifty-one thousand verses—inspired by folklore, the Qur'an, stories of saints and teachers, and sayings of Muhammed. Rendered by Rumi's premier English translators, these excerpts from the Mathnawi are pre This Rumi collection features selections from one of the world's great spiritual masterpieces, the Mathnawi. The Mathnawi consists of six volumes of poetry in rhyme—over fifty-one thousand verses—inspired by folklore, the Qur'an, stories of saints and teachers, and sayings of Muhammed. Rendered by Rumi's premier English translators, these excerpts from the Mathnawi are presented in American free-verse style.


Compare

This Rumi collection features selections from one of the world's great spiritual masterpieces, the Mathnawi. The Mathnawi consists of six volumes of poetry in rhyme—over fifty-one thousand verses—inspired by folklore, the Qur'an, stories of saints and teachers, and sayings of Muhammed. Rendered by Rumi's premier English translators, these excerpts from the Mathnawi are pre This Rumi collection features selections from one of the world's great spiritual masterpieces, the Mathnawi. The Mathnawi consists of six volumes of poetry in rhyme—over fifty-one thousand verses—inspired by folklore, the Qur'an, stories of saints and teachers, and sayings of Muhammed. Rendered by Rumi's premier English translators, these excerpts from the Mathnawi are presented in American free-verse style.

30 review for This Longing: Poetry, Teaching Stories, and Letters

  1. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    While waiting for a phone call in my little library on Sunday, I picked up "This Longing", excerpts from the Masnavi, a 6-volume set of verses by a famous sufi poet, Maulana Rum, or Rumi. Maulana is teacher or professor, Rum means from the town of Rum, and the given name is Jalalladin. He lived from 1203 to 1263 in Turkey. His own Master or Spiritual Guide was Shams Tabriz. He was a mystic and so he would not accept donations from others, and had to make his own living. Very fortunately for us, While waiting for a phone call in my little library on Sunday, I picked up "This Longing", excerpts from the Masnavi, a 6-volume set of verses by a famous sufi poet, Maulana Rum, or Rumi. Maulana is teacher or professor, Rum means from the town of Rum, and the given name is Jalalladin. He lived from 1203 to 1263 in Turkey. His own Master or Spiritual Guide was Shams Tabriz. He was a mystic and so he would not accept donations from others, and had to make his own living. Very fortunately for us, he made his living by writing poetry, and "teaching stories." I was savoring a teaching story. Before I go into that, I must say that although others don't like Coleman Barks, I think he's the best, based only on my enjoyment of the poems and stories he has translated. So, Rumi was born in Konya, Turkey, but moved to Kabul, Afghanistan at a fairly young age. His stories and poetry paint a picture of a time of world trade moving through Afghanistan, tolerance for Christians and Jews in a Muslim country, and a high status for all women. At that time there were slaves, but even slaves were relatively free. It was an open-minded and interesting time in many ways. He used the symbolism of birds often, birds as a soul, a caged soul, caged in the body, looking for liberation. That symbolism is still used today, for example this excerpt from a more recent publication: "Grace and Effort are the two wings of the Bird of the Soul as it flies to the higher regions." In the teaching story I read, a merchant is traveling to a distant country and asks his friends, relatives, and his parrot, what they would like. After getting lists of various material gifts from his friends and relatives, the parrot tells him that he wants him to ask any parrots he meets in this foreign country for advice. The merchant, after finishing his trading and preparing to return, buys the gifts requested, and then asks a group of parrots for advice for his parrot. Surprisingly, one of the parrots immediately falls dead to the ground. After the merchant returns home, his parrot asks what the other parrots had told him. He said he received no advice, but that one of the parrots had immediately fallen to its death. Upon hearing this, his parrot also suddenly died. Thinking it odd and feeling greatly concerned, the merchant opened the cage that held the parrot. The parrot immediately flew to its freedom, only returning to tell the merchant that it is only by dying to this world that one can become free. I know, an obvious spiritual analogy, but Rumi knew that stories would stick in our minds much better than admonition and dogma.

  2. 5 out of 5

    QS

    In retrospect, I suppose picking up a religious poet was probably not the best idea I ever had. I don't know what I was expecting, but it...wasn't this? I have one poem marked that I actually liked, one page marked for a couple of lines I liked, and I wrote down a line from the Letters section in the back. But mostly I'm feeling sort of "meh" about the collection. Hopefully the other book I picked up will have a more engaging collection. It's certainly longer, anyway! The line from the letters is In retrospect, I suppose picking up a religious poet was probably not the best idea I ever had. I don't know what I was expecting, but it...wasn't this? I have one poem marked that I actually liked, one page marked for a couple of lines I liked, and I wrote down a line from the Letters section in the back. But mostly I'm feeling sort of "meh" about the collection. Hopefully the other book I picked up will have a more engaging collection. It's certainly longer, anyway! The line from the letters is a doublet, by the way: "The crime is that I met you, you who kill the living and visit the dead." I found the letters portion to be more engaging than the excerpts from the Mathnawi, actually. The poetry was all the expected religious moral-giving stuff (and to think he wrote six books of this), but the letters allowed you to see the personal side to a highly respected religious man. (Apparently he was Caliph which is, uh, let's just say "impressive".) It's way cooler to read about a religious man being a man than it is to read about him being religious. :)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    This was my first experience with Rumi aside from some random quotes I’ve seen here and there and... I don’t get it? Maybe this shouldn’t have been what I started with so I need a suggestion for what to read to get a better idea of THE Rumi that people speak so highly of.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Erotic Horizon

    This Longing: Poetry, Teaching Stories, and Letters of Rumi by Jelaluddin Rumi (2000)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nabanitac

    Rumi s poetries , as someone told me years back ," create waves .. not ripples ". Rumi s poetries , as someone told me years back ," create waves .. not ripples ".

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michael Graber

    these letters are as stunning as the best poems, lovely and inspiring

  7. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    "Some people speak before they're born. Still blind, they act as though they see. The yelp of a puppy in the womb is not to keep watch, or to start game, or for food. It is the speech of a man who wants spiritual eminence without the reality. The barking is his nonsense. He points to what he doesn't see." ~ "Waiting and imitating someone else's wanting has blinded him. But as he follows along in the searching, calling out what the others call out, suddenly he sees his own camel browsing there, the "Some people speak before they're born. Still blind, they act as though they see. The yelp of a puppy in the womb is not to keep watch, or to start game, or for food. It is the speech of a man who wants spiritual eminence without the reality. The barking is his nonsense. He points to what he doesn't see." ~ "Waiting and imitating someone else's wanting has blinded him. But as he follows along in the searching, calling out what the others call out, suddenly he sees his own camel browsing there, the one he didn't know he lost. Only then, does he become the seeker." ~ "Everyone is half honeybee, half snake. Some eat herbs like a bee, and their spittle is medicine. Others drink sherbet made from filthy water and form venom in their mouths." ~ "You came late and left early. That's the way with wildflowers."

  8. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    A good book all around, but there are some parts that either drag or do not apply to the modern reader. It is a wonderful collection of texts to be respected, and thumbed through at leisure.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jonele

    I don't know a lot about poetry, and some of this I can't say I understood. There were a few nuggets that even I couldn't miss.... I don't know a lot about poetry, and some of this I can't say I understood. There were a few nuggets that even I couldn't miss....

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brent

    I love Coleman's translations of Rumi, and here is another generous sampling. "You want a spirit-drenching? Dig a hole in this book, the Mathnawi, this island. Make holes, so the ocean can flow up through." I do find these translations speak to me. The poems, excerpts from the Mathnawi, and a selection of letters are extraordinary extracts from a deep well of spiritual concern. Highly recommended. I love Coleman's translations of Rumi, and here is another generous sampling. "You want a spirit-drenching? Dig a hole in this book, the Mathnawi, this island. Make holes, so the ocean can flow up through." I do find these translations speak to me. The poems, excerpts from the Mathnawi, and a selection of letters are extraordinary extracts from a deep well of spiritual concern. Highly recommended.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Terree

  12. 4 out of 5

    Keeyoon

  13. 5 out of 5

    Simon Cook

  14. 4 out of 5

    Hamza

  15. 5 out of 5

    orla kinane

  16. 5 out of 5

    Isoya Tatsuya

  17. 5 out of 5

    Arwa

  18. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rahmat

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Saunders

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sumit

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hena Tariq

  23. 4 out of 5

    Angelica

  24. 5 out of 5

    BinniE

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ghasala

  26. 5 out of 5

    Karen A. Sarli

  27. 4 out of 5

    Daveia

  28. 5 out of 5

    Aberjhani

  29. 5 out of 5

    Luna

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Lynch

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.