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The 1883 Eruption of Krakatoa: The History of the World's Most Notorious Volcanic Explosions

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*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the eruption *Includes a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "In 1883, Krakatoa suddenly sprang into notoriety. Insignificantly though it had hitherto seemed the little island was soon to compel by its tones of thunder the whole world to pay it instant attention. It was to become the scene of a volcanic *Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the eruption *Includes a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "In 1883, Krakatoa suddenly sprang into notoriety. Insignificantly though it had hitherto seemed the little island was soon to compel by its tones of thunder the whole world to pay it instant attention. It was to become the scene of a volcanic outbreak so appalling that it is destined to be remembered throughout the ages.” – Sir Robert Ball Volcanic eruptions have amazed people for millennia, and notorious ones like the eruption of Mount St. Helens can still be immediately recalled even by some who weren’t alive at the time, but perhaps the most famous and most destructive eruption in modern history was the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa. Even without the instantaneous forms of communication that are now available, the world watched in wonder for new updates about a tiny South Pacific island, and though few of them would ever go there, Krakatoa remained a source of fascination for the much of the world for the next 50 years. Krakatoa had already been the scene of volcanic activity for hundreds of years, and some of the eruptions had been documented by early European explorers in the 17th century. In 1681, one Dutchman named Johann Wilhelm Vogel noted, “I saw with amazement that the island of Krakatoa, on my first trip to Sumatra [June 1679] completely green and healthy with trees, lay completely burnt and barren in front of our eyes and that at four locations was throwing up large chunks of fire. And when I asked the ship's Captain when the aforementioned island had erupted, he told me that this had happened in May 1680...He showed me a piece of pumice as big as his fist." Nonetheless, nobody could have prepared for the scope of the 1883 eruption, which was so violent that it destroyed most of the island of Krakatoa and could be heard about 3,000 miles away. The force of the explosion was equivalent to four times the strength of the most powerful nuclear weapon ever detonated, and the spread of ash and lava, as well as the tsunamis generated by the force of the eruption, ultimately killed at least 35,000 people (and possibly over 100,000) across the Dutch East Indies. With plumes of smoke rising upwards of 50 miles in the air, Krakatoa’s eruption influenced the entire global climate for several years, and debris and corpses were still washing up on shores across the Pacific throughout that time. The force was so powerful that it actually affected the height of waves in the English Channel. The 1883 Eruption of Krakatoa chronicles the history of one of the world’s most notorious natural disasters. Along with a bibliography and pictures of important people and places, you will learn about Krakatoa like never before, in no time at all.


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*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the eruption *Includes a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "In 1883, Krakatoa suddenly sprang into notoriety. Insignificantly though it had hitherto seemed the little island was soon to compel by its tones of thunder the whole world to pay it instant attention. It was to become the scene of a volcanic *Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the eruption *Includes a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "In 1883, Krakatoa suddenly sprang into notoriety. Insignificantly though it had hitherto seemed the little island was soon to compel by its tones of thunder the whole world to pay it instant attention. It was to become the scene of a volcanic outbreak so appalling that it is destined to be remembered throughout the ages.” – Sir Robert Ball Volcanic eruptions have amazed people for millennia, and notorious ones like the eruption of Mount St. Helens can still be immediately recalled even by some who weren’t alive at the time, but perhaps the most famous and most destructive eruption in modern history was the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa. Even without the instantaneous forms of communication that are now available, the world watched in wonder for new updates about a tiny South Pacific island, and though few of them would ever go there, Krakatoa remained a source of fascination for the much of the world for the next 50 years. Krakatoa had already been the scene of volcanic activity for hundreds of years, and some of the eruptions had been documented by early European explorers in the 17th century. In 1681, one Dutchman named Johann Wilhelm Vogel noted, “I saw with amazement that the island of Krakatoa, on my first trip to Sumatra [June 1679] completely green and healthy with trees, lay completely burnt and barren in front of our eyes and that at four locations was throwing up large chunks of fire. And when I asked the ship's Captain when the aforementioned island had erupted, he told me that this had happened in May 1680...He showed me a piece of pumice as big as his fist." Nonetheless, nobody could have prepared for the scope of the 1883 eruption, which was so violent that it destroyed most of the island of Krakatoa and could be heard about 3,000 miles away. The force of the explosion was equivalent to four times the strength of the most powerful nuclear weapon ever detonated, and the spread of ash and lava, as well as the tsunamis generated by the force of the eruption, ultimately killed at least 35,000 people (and possibly over 100,000) across the Dutch East Indies. With plumes of smoke rising upwards of 50 miles in the air, Krakatoa’s eruption influenced the entire global climate for several years, and debris and corpses were still washing up on shores across the Pacific throughout that time. The force was so powerful that it actually affected the height of waves in the English Channel. The 1883 Eruption of Krakatoa chronicles the history of one of the world’s most notorious natural disasters. Along with a bibliography and pictures of important people and places, you will learn about Krakatoa like never before, in no time at all.

30 review for The 1883 Eruption of Krakatoa: The History of the World's Most Notorious Volcanic Explosions

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sarah - All The Book Blog Names Are Taken

    I'd never heard of this disaster before - not sure how that's possible, given its magnitude. Decent intro and I'll be reading more in-depth books about it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Krakatoa Story Excellent short summary of the highlights of the Eruption of Krakatoa. I recommend The book by Simon Winchester for a much longer in-depth coverage of the history of Krakatoa and the events of the Eruption.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Rose

    History of Disaster If you've ever wondered what the big deal was with Krakatoa this provides maps and first hand accounts of the disaster that killed at least 36000. Charles River does a good job with their short histories to keep them interesting but also deep enough to educate.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Paddy O'Shea

  5. 4 out of 5

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  7. 4 out of 5

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  8. 4 out of 5

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  9. 5 out of 5

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  10. 5 out of 5

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  11. 4 out of 5

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  12. 5 out of 5

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  13. 4 out of 5

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  14. 5 out of 5

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  27. 5 out of 5

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  28. 4 out of 5

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  29. 5 out of 5

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  30. 4 out of 5

    Terri Motz

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