counter create hit William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace

Availability: Ready to download

O Threepio, Threepio, wherefore art thou, Threepio? Join us, good gentles, for a merry reimagining of Star Wars: Episode I as only Shakespeare could have written it. The entire saga starts here, with a thrilling tale featuring a disguised queen, a young hero, and two fearless knights facing a hidden, vengeful enemy. 'Tis a true Shakespearean drama, filled with sword fights, O Threepio, Threepio, wherefore art thou, Threepio? Join us, good gentles, for a merry reimagining of Star Wars: Episode I as only Shakespeare could have written it. The entire saga starts here, with a thrilling tale featuring a disguised queen, a young hero, and two fearless knights facing a hidden, vengeful enemy. 'Tis a true Shakespearean drama, filled with sword fights, soliloquies, and doomed romance... all in glorious iambic pentameter and coupled with twenty gorgeous Elizabethan illustrations. Hold onto your mini-chlorians: The play's the thing, wherein you'll catch the rise of Anakin!


Compare

O Threepio, Threepio, wherefore art thou, Threepio? Join us, good gentles, for a merry reimagining of Star Wars: Episode I as only Shakespeare could have written it. The entire saga starts here, with a thrilling tale featuring a disguised queen, a young hero, and two fearless knights facing a hidden, vengeful enemy. 'Tis a true Shakespearean drama, filled with sword fights, O Threepio, Threepio, wherefore art thou, Threepio? Join us, good gentles, for a merry reimagining of Star Wars: Episode I as only Shakespeare could have written it. The entire saga starts here, with a thrilling tale featuring a disguised queen, a young hero, and two fearless knights facing a hidden, vengeful enemy. 'Tis a true Shakespearean drama, filled with sword fights, soliloquies, and doomed romance... all in glorious iambic pentameter and coupled with twenty gorgeous Elizabethan illustrations. Hold onto your mini-chlorians: The play's the thing, wherein you'll catch the rise of Anakin!

30 review for William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace

  1. 4 out of 5

    JV (semi-hiatus)

    Verily, verily, upon to thee, I say... Hark! For thou shalt hear a star-crossed tale, In a time long ago, In a galaxy far, far away... In troth, Phantom of Menace, thou, mayhap, film have seen... Yet read opportune, perchance, not, it might seem! Alack! I urge ye to peruse this work, Oh dear, prithee, lest I gleefully twerk! Behold, as peaceful Naboo taketh a bow... The puissant Trade Federation overtaketh now. Fie! Senator Palpatine doth maketh a plan, Annihilate! Obliterate! The planet for him to take! Verily, verily, upon to thee, I say... Hark! For thou shalt hear a star-crossed tale, In a time long ago, In a galaxy far, far away... In troth, Phantom of Menace, thou, mayhap, film have seen... Yet read opportune, perchance, not, it might seem! Alack! I urge ye to peruse this work, Oh dear, prithee, lest I gleefully twerk! Behold, as peaceful Naboo taketh a bow... The puissant Trade Federation overtaketh now. Fie! Senator Palpatine doth maketh a plan, Annihilate! Obliterate! The planet for him to take! Be not afeard, the world is hope replete, Jinn, Kenobi, and Binks, allies they've sought! Padmé, for one, the queen in Naboo, Thou must believeth, forsooth, this was true. To Tatooine, they went and chanced upon a slave... Anakin's his name — aye, the beginning of his fame! Onward and forward, to Coruscant traverse, Yet a shadow hath befallen, the Senate's now cursed! For what hath cometh, the Jedi doth not know, Pray, the Sith, extinct — for the galaxy mayst fall! Alas! Thou hath cometh to the inevitable end, For this is where we part, my well-read friends. Should thou decideth to read this book, Be wary though, thou might get hooked! For this might seem an Elizabethan play... Iambic pentametre — Shakespearean way! To the dark side of the Force, Fear’s the surest path. Fear leads to anger, Onward leads anger to hate, Hate to suffering. - Yoda

  2. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    Ian Doescher is so witty. I love that he can turn this story into something with weight and his iambic pentameter is so right on. He takes the horrible character of Jar Jar Binks and turns him into quite a great character playing the fool. There is a line that Qiu-Gon Gin that is the speech from the Taken movie - hilarious. This works on so many levels and being a Shakespeare fan, I love it. It reads well and fast and Ian really knows his Shakespeare and he uses all the devices from the plays. T Ian Doescher is so witty. I love that he can turn this story into something with weight and his iambic pentameter is so right on. He takes the horrible character of Jar Jar Binks and turns him into quite a great character playing the fool. There is a line that Qiu-Gon Gin that is the speech from the Taken movie - hilarious. This works on so many levels and being a Shakespeare fan, I love it. It reads well and fast and Ian really knows his Shakespeare and he uses all the devices from the plays. There's everything you need to be a play of the Bard, politics, fools, two lovers, good characters and evil villains. It plays so well. I hope to be able to read the rest of these. They are so well done.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    *I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review* I was very surprised by this book! It's no secret that I love Star Wars, but when I first heard of this book I thought the author had changed the story a bunch... And was just a little skeptical. I put it off, but recently watched the newest Star Wars, the Force Awakens, and decided to pick these up. I was super pleased to realize that not that much from the original story was changed! I loved how the author changed the di *I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review* I was very surprised by this book! It's no secret that I love Star Wars, but when I first heard of this book I thought the author had changed the story a bunch... And was just a little skeptical. I put it off, but recently watched the newest Star Wars, the Force Awakens, and decided to pick these up. I was super pleased to realize that not that much from the original story was changed! I loved how the author changed the dialogue however and I thought he did a fantastic job! I could hardly tell it wasn't Shakespeare himself writing! Haha I also enjoyed Jar Jar Binks' character. First off, NO I don't hate him like the rest of the world. But this author really took a unique spin on his story and made him much more aware of what was going on around him. I really liked this change! I'm definitely going to pick up the rest of these!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Blamp Head

    O, wherefore art thou but so little pleased? Because thou read not Phantom of Menace, Alack! But this be but the fourth of four So far released in this most grand old lot. Behold! Mister Binks, he is no one's fool. 'Ere thou too harshly judge his wretched soul, In this iambic pentameter play, Binks plays his cards with perfect aptitude. O, wert thou not but wasting thy short time, Thou wouldst mayhap hath read yet Anakin's A-rising out from podraced slavery To clench his place in the wise Jedi ranks. And no O, wherefore art thou but so little pleased? Because thou read not Phantom of Menace, Alack! But this be but the fourth of four So far released in this most grand old lot. Behold! Mister Binks, he is no one's fool. 'Ere thou too harshly judge his wretched soul, In this iambic pentameter play, Binks plays his cards with perfect aptitude. O, wert thou not but wasting thy short time, Thou wouldst mayhap hath read yet Anakin's A-rising out from podraced slavery To clench his place in the wise Jedi ranks. And noble Qui Gon, fie! That thou shouldst die So early, saga-wise. And Gungans fight, Dear Padme rules, while Palpatine doth plot, And Maul, well, thou art still a weakling true. Dost thou sit? Wherefore read thou not the book? O, but a holy crap! I tire early. Iambic pentameter: thou art hard.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Wreade1872

    ..When some gross fault of theirs is then expos’d, They throw their hands unto the sky and cry, “O, now ’tis us who sorely are oppress’d!” Thus do the dominating twist the tale And make themselves the subject of their pity, Whilst turning blind eye to those truly plagued.. This is a REALLY good adaptation, unfortunately even shakespeare can't save this plot. This isn't a straightforward translation to the shakespearian either, there are various injokes and pop culture references too, most of which i c ..When some gross fault of theirs is then expos’d, They throw their hands unto the sky and cry, “O, now ’tis us who sorely are oppress’d!” Thus do the dominating twist the tale And make themselves the subject of their pity, Whilst turning blind eye to those truly plagued.. This is a REALLY good adaptation, unfortunately even shakespeare can't save this plot. This isn't a straightforward translation to the shakespearian either, there are various injokes and pop culture references too, most of which i could have done without but i didn't mind them much. I was mildly distracted at times trying to picture how they would actually stage this at the new Globe theatre etc. There is a LOT going on in some scenes with a lot of people in different locations. The characters are a big improvement on the original, you can do a lot with asides and soliquays. I also like the addition of Rumour, who added some useful exposition. Couple of quibbles, towards the end i couldn't figure out if Jar-Jar was on the field of battle or in the palace, also i have no idea what happened in the throne room it was a bit messy on the page. The alien gibberish and droid speak seems even more annoying to my ears despite many asides and translations. The main issue though is the original plot. Even with Rumour to help i still don't know how the Trade Federation and Senate actually function. Also you spend an inordinate amount of time on what is essentially a side-quest to get the ship fixed so you can get to the senate... where nothing happens and they go home again :| . And there are other plot issues but my point is that the improvement in many areas tended to highlight some of the underlying problems. Anyway as an adaptation at least 4 stars, maybe even 5 out of 5. However this is still the Phantom Menace.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Debby

    4 stars I embarked on this quirky little series when I thought it would only be the original Star Wars series, so I was a bit surprised to hear about William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace. You would think that after three books, the novelty of the Shakespearification of Star Wars might wear off - but no! I enjoyed The Phantom of Menace immensely. I'll be upfront with you and say that of all the Star Wars movies, The Phantom Menace is my least favorite. This is the case for many fans, I belie 4 stars I embarked on this quirky little series when I thought it would only be the original Star Wars series, so I was a bit surprised to hear about William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace. You would think that after three books, the novelty of the Shakespearification of Star Wars might wear off - but no! I enjoyed The Phantom of Menace immensely. I'll be upfront with you and say that of all the Star Wars movies, The Phantom Menace is my least favorite. This is the case for many fans, I believe, because the story's weaker and - well - Jar Jar Binks happened. But I might venture to say that William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace is my favorite of Ian Doescher's retellings so far. I KNOW. I'm just as surprised as you are. While in essence the story lacks some of the elements that made the original trilogy so great (Han Solo, HanxLeia, Darth Vader, Han Solooooooo), Doescher's really hit his stride in this one. First off, I felt the writing has gotten so much stronger. It's immediately noticeable that Doescher's gotten even more comfortable with Shakespearian English and has adopted more and more of his techniques. In the previous books something might have felt a bit clunky a time or two, but I honestly didn't notice it anymore. Doescher's writing is faithful to both Shakespeare and the Star Wars films and there are so many hilarious Easter eggs - from modified Shakespeare quotes to modified classic film quotes. It's so clever and witty and enjoyable. Doescher also takes some risks in The Phantom of Menace - truly reinterpreting the original film and making modifications here and there to show his interpretation while also staying faithful to original Shakespeare storytelling norms. The biggest of these changes, obviously, would be Jar Jar Binks's role. Jar Jar is famously hated as being annoying and stupid - generally getting in the way of the other characters. Doescher transforms his character as one who is actually keenly aware of what is happening around him, who plays a stupid role to get others to respond in the ways he desires. It's daring. Not all readers will agree. But I liked it quite a lot. Jar Jar does come across as stupid in the films, but he does help the group sometimes, in important ways, though that might be brushed off as coincidence more often than not. But Doescher gives this character a lot more depth that I do find believable and I think makes the story as a whole much stronger. Now, there are a few weaker points in this book - namely that there are so many characters that it's hard to keep track of at times. Of course, there is the cast list at the beginning, but I was too lazy to keep flipping back and forth. But I really enjoyed this book, perhaps even surprising myself by how much. The thing is, while the prequel trilogy gets a lot of shit from hardcore Star Wars fans, I will always have a special place for it in my heart because of the super important character arc that Anakin has. In The Phantom of Menace there is ample foreshadowing for how this will shape up in the remaining two books, and I can't wait for it. I know Doescher can add so much depth to these characters, so I trust the rest of the series to be amazing. Summing Up: With much stronger writing and interesting creative liberties, Doescher has a hit in William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace. Honestly, when I started reading this series, I thought it would be amusing but not that remarkable. Now I'm just in full enjoyment and awe of the writing and this unique take on a much loved saga. GIF it to me straight! Recommended To: All Star Wars fans (provided Shakespeare doesn't scare them off). *A finished copy was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the contents of the review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Stormblessed

    Now this is art. The iambic pentameter? The rhyming couplets at the end? The improvised dialect to compensate for action? The wit is strong with this one. Here’s some of my favorite quotes that are beautifully iconic: >OBI-WAN: What’s more—your foresight wise they could not thwart: Negotiations were, indeed, quite short. >ANAKIN: [to Padmé] Excuse me this intrusion, madam, but: Are you by some celestial body sent? >QUI-GON: The Force knows not of accident nor chance, But wisely guides our footfalls, on Now this is art. The iambic pentameter? The rhyming couplets at the end? The improvised dialect to compensate for action? The wit is strong with this one. Here’s some of my favorite quotes that are beautifully iconic: >OBI-WAN: What’s more—your foresight wise they could not thwart: Negotiations were, indeed, quite short. >ANAKIN: [to Padmé] Excuse me this intrusion, madam, but: Are you by some celestial body sent? >QUI-GON: The Force knows not of accident nor chance, But wisely guides our footfalls, one by one. >YODA: To the dark side of the Force, Fear leads to anger, Onward leads anger to hate, Hate to suffering. A bounty of fear Is present in thy spirit— Fear beyond measure. >QUI-GON: Two life-forms that together dwell as one, Each make the other stronger when they’re join’d, And both do benefit in the exchange. These, then, are symbionts. Thus, if there were No midi-chlorians, life would be naught. And neither would we know the Force’s pow’r. If we but listen, they e’re speak to us And tell us of the Force and what it wills. And thou dost learn to quiet thine own mind, Thou shalt, like whisper’d poetry, hear their Majestic voices ringing in thine ears. QUI-GON: I know not who you are or what you want, Yes I do have skills most particular, Acquir’d throughout a Jedi’s long career. The skills do make me nightmarish to such As you. Surrender now, and you shall live— If not, you shall be dead, and there’s an end. >ANAKIN: —We fly beyond its walls R2— This truly is what podracing should be! >QUI-GON: [kneeling:] Be still, my soul, the Force is on thy side. Be silent, heart, and let thy raging cease. Be quiet, mind, and to this time assent. Be calm, my body, take the proffer’d rest. I know not whether I may yet prevail, Or if this shall become old Qui-Gon’s end. If I defeat this foe, still doubts remain: Who is behind this killer’s presence here? and how did they arise again, the Sith? ‘Twould be a better ending if I could Subdue the foe and question him at length. Yea murther is within his aspect. Yea, He shall not let me live another hour And shall not answer any query pos’d. ‘Tis he or I shall live—or die—herein. You Jedi ancestors, here now my plea: If I do slay him, help us find the source Of this most strange and frightful newfound threat. If ‘tis my time to die, let it be swift And painless, let my spirit fly with grace. I think upon the things that I have done, And those things yet undone that I would do, Mayhap they shall not be, when I am gone. A tragic and weighty thought is this. Mine only cares are for the wondrous boy, And for my young apprentice, Obi-Wan, And for the Jedi and whose name I serve. If now the time for me is come, O ghosts Of Jedi passed and gone, I ask but this: Protect my friends, for they are all my life.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Ian Doescher takes on the task of bringing the Star Wars prequels to the Elizabethan stage in “William Shakespeare’s The Phantom of Menace” to fantastic results that will be jarring to any of those who dislike the film. Given the first prequel’s notorious reputation amongst the Star Wars fandom, Doescher gives the maligned film a magnificent theatrical presentation that would make any hardcore fan happy. The biggest issue Doescher had to deal with was obviously Jar Jar Binks, who instead of being Ian Doescher takes on the task of bringing the Star Wars prequels to the Elizabethan stage in “William Shakespeare’s The Phantom of Menace” to fantastic results that will be jarring to any of those who dislike the film. Given the first prequel’s notorious reputation amongst the Star Wars fandom, Doescher gives the maligned film a magnificent theatrical presentation that would make any hardcore fan happy. The biggest issue Doescher had to deal with was obviously Jar Jar Binks, who instead of being just a vacant-minded fool is instead a radical-who-plays-the-fool to help united the Gungans with the Naboo. As one reads, you notice the subtlety that Doescher gives to Jar Jar as the acting fool in front of everyone else and his true political radical personality in soliloquies and asides. The other issue that Doescher dealt with was the 10-minute podrace, his answer was by following Shakespeare’s led in having Padme and Jar Jar act as messengers relating the action of the race to Qui-Gon and Shmi and those the audience. Once Doescher had dealt with these two big issues the rest of “The Phantom of Menace” was like his previous three Star Wars Shakespearean adaptations, keep true to the film while adding background for characters in soliloquies and asides. Doescher even has fun with Qui-Gon and Mace Windu’s dialogues by sprinkling references to Liam Neeson and Samuel L. Jackson’s other film roles but still staying true to the scene in which they are in. Overall “The Phantom of Menace” is a wonderful adaptation and is a credit to Ian Doescher’s imaginative writing that makes it feel better than its film inspiration. Whether or not you like The Phantom Menace, if you like Doescher’s Shakespearean adaptations do not hesitate to read this one because you will enjoy it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Compared to the original movies, the prequels are going to be a bit more of a challenge to Shakespeareify. Not because the basic plots are bad, but because the dialog is atrocious. I'm doing my damnedest to come up with a solidly quotable line from the prequels and coming up blank. But believe me, I can come up with dozens of cringingly awful ones. Doescher, I think, does his best, but this is kind of a weak movie to adapt. He helps his cause by applying his own interpretation to JarJar: he's on Compared to the original movies, the prequels are going to be a bit more of a challenge to Shakespeareify. Not because the basic plots are bad, but because the dialog is atrocious. I'm doing my damnedest to come up with a solidly quotable line from the prequels and coming up blank. But believe me, I can come up with dozens of cringingly awful ones. Doescher, I think, does his best, but this is kind of a weak movie to adapt. He helps his cause by applying his own interpretation to JarJar: he's only playing the fool to try and help his goal of achieving unity between Naboo's Gungan and human populations. And it generally works, but there's just not much helping this character. More than anything, this book reminds me that, with a good screenwriter, the prequels would have been much, much better movies.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Abby

    These books never fail to tickle me. Every time I pick one up, I expect a Shakespearean version of the classic films. However, Doescher puts his own twist on the stories. I particularly like how he made Jar Jar an intelligent creature, who is simply misunderstood. What? A likable Jar Jar? I know, I'm in shock too. These books never fail to tickle me. Every time I pick one up, I expect a Shakespearean version of the classic films. However, Doescher puts his own twist on the stories. I particularly like how he made Jar Jar an intelligent creature, who is simply misunderstood. What? A likable Jar Jar? I know, I'm in shock too.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Eva B.

    Not as good as Doescher's other Star Wars works, but still solid. Not as good as Doescher's other Star Wars works, but still solid.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jessamyn Leigh

    These mashups of two of my favorite things never disappoint. Highlights of this one include using asides to reveal Jar Jar as secretly intelligent but playing dumb to unite the Naboo and the Gungans, and meta references to Liam Neeson and Samuel L. Jackson's other movies. The already good dialogue (Palpatine) becomes glorious, the painful (Lil Anakin) becomes bearable. And can we talk about the illustrations?! I'm already a huge fan of The Phantom Menace's production design and it married so wel These mashups of two of my favorite things never disappoint. Highlights of this one include using asides to reveal Jar Jar as secretly intelligent but playing dumb to unite the Naboo and the Gungans, and meta references to Liam Neeson and Samuel L. Jackson's other movies. The already good dialogue (Palpatine) becomes glorious, the painful (Lil Anakin) becomes bearable. And can we talk about the illustrations?! I'm already a huge fan of The Phantom Menace's production design and it married so well with Elizabethan styles. Brb drooling over that cover art forever.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This was like reading the movie's script, but done up in faux-Shakespearean style. It gets a bit cheesy using famous lines from Shakespeare's plays (like "Et tu, Brute?"), but otherwise does an admirable job of bringing that sort of language to the Star Wars plot. Jar Jar Binks is retold as a gifted philosopher posing as a nitwit due to Qui-Gon's prejudices. R2-D2 also speaks proper English in his asides, as well. Yoda speaks in haiku, which is also pretty neat. I had fun reading this and rememb This was like reading the movie's script, but done up in faux-Shakespearean style. It gets a bit cheesy using famous lines from Shakespeare's plays (like "Et tu, Brute?"), but otherwise does an admirable job of bringing that sort of language to the Star Wars plot. Jar Jar Binks is retold as a gifted philosopher posing as a nitwit due to Qui-Gon's prejudices. R2-D2 also speaks proper English in his asides, as well. Yoda speaks in haiku, which is also pretty neat. I had fun reading this and remembering the movie I'm fond of, but I won't be reading any more Shakespeare/Star Wars mash ups.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Okay, this one was fun. I'm really enjoying this series. This one was more remarkable than the others so far in that it was better than the movie it was based on. Doescher even manages to make Jar Jar Binks bearable. Who would have thought such a thing was even possible. I enjoyed the other pop culture references that were tossed in, including song lyrics and references to Liam Niesen's role in Taken. Okay, this one was fun. I'm really enjoying this series. This one was more remarkable than the others so far in that it was better than the movie it was based on. Doescher even manages to make Jar Jar Binks bearable. Who would have thought such a thing was even possible. I enjoyed the other pop culture references that were tossed in, including song lyrics and references to Liam Niesen's role in Taken.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

    I forgot how much I love this series! In fact I don't even have a good reason as to why it took me this long to finally pick it back up. Even though I dislike these movies, Ian Doescher worked his magic and made me find a reason to love them. He might have even given me a few reason to enjoy JarJar, just a few. Though, I still find C3PO annoying not matter in what form he's written. Hats off to Ian Doescher as well. Not only for how many times he had to watch this movie, but for how amazing this I forgot how much I love this series! In fact I don't even have a good reason as to why it took me this long to finally pick it back up. Even though I dislike these movies, Ian Doescher worked his magic and made me find a reason to love them. He might have even given me a few reason to enjoy JarJar, just a few. Though, I still find C3PO annoying not matter in what form he's written. Hats off to Ian Doescher as well. Not only for how many times he had to watch this movie, but for how amazing this book flowed. Writing in iambic pentameter is hard enough, but having to do while describing a podrace and droid battle to the point the have to make sense. Amazing! Personally I felt the book flowed well and had great pacing. While this was suppose to be a bus book, it quickly become a while I was cooking, not into this show, and right before bed book. Devoured faster than I do most books, and I've already downloaded the next book in this series. Not because I enjoy the prequels, but because I can't wait to see how Ian Doescher writes angsty Skywalker. A lot of work went into this book and it shows. Never once did the theme of the book drop. The characters were as true to themselves as I remember them being. Though I have to admit it's been so long since I've seen this movie I had to go back and check to see if things really happened. I forgot Padme had a body double. I forgot about how the movie even opened up, and I also forgot that Skywalker has always crush on Padme. Also, I loved famous moments of Shakespeare's work appeared throughout the story. Which as a lover of most of Shakespeare's work, I enjoyed. And, got a few weird looks on the bus when I laughed. Which is fine, this book is totally work the odd looks. It might have even convinced to re-watch the movies. Maybe. But, I'm definilty picking this series back up and getting caught up in time to catch the next book in the series, Jedi the Last. Buy, Borrow, or Skip: Personally I borrowed this one from local library, but anything that gets you to pick up this series is a plus. It's hilarious and so well put together.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace is written by Ian Doescher and inspired by William Shakespeare and Star Wars: The Phantom Menace. When I came across this title at my local bookstore, I thought why not? I love Shakespeare and I love Star Wars – what can possibly go wrong? Except that I may end up hating both Shakespeare and Star Wars at the end of the day, but I decided to take the risk. The next question is should I start with the original trilogy or the prequels? I decided to start William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace is written by Ian Doescher and inspired by William Shakespeare and Star Wars: The Phantom Menace. When I came across this title at my local bookstore, I thought why not? I love Shakespeare and I love Star Wars – what can possibly go wrong? Except that I may end up hating both Shakespeare and Star Wars at the end of the day, but I decided to take the risk. The next question is should I start with the original trilogy or the prequels? I decided to start at the beginning and hope for the best. It is generally viewed that the prequels are rather dreadful compared to the original trilogy and the first film being the weakest of them all, and I would not disagree with that statement. However, I found loving this interpretation of Star Wars: The Phantom Menace more than I thought I would – more than I thought was possible – I even love (and I can't believe that I'm going to type this) Jar Jar Binks. For the most part Doescher is rather faithful to the source – except in two areas. Firstly it is more humorous than I remember the original film and secondly Jar Jar Binks. His character was more aware of his surroundings, but chooses to act as a fool. Like in many Shakespearean plays, the fool is often the one that dispense much of the reason and wisdom of the world and is often the smartest person on the stage. Although I'm no Elizabethan English or Shakespearean expert, but I find that the dialogue transformation to Elizabethan English was well done. I wouldn't call Doescher Shakespeare, but he is awfully close. There is one quibble that I have to mention and that the Dramatis Personae is rather large and it was difficult to keep the characters straight, but that's just a minor quibble that has very little result of my enjoyment of this book. All in all, William Shakespeare's The Phantom of Menace was written rather well and a very interesting rendition of Star Wars: The Phantom Menace written in Elizabethan English and in iambic pentameter no less!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    Short Review I've reviewed Ian Doescher's William Shakespeare's Star Wars original series, which I thoroughly enjoyed overall. The Phantom of Menace was good, but it had a lot of missed opportunities. For one, whole scenes were deleted (the funeral of Qui-Gon Jinn), which could have had some lovely asides from Anakin and Obi-Wan both. I know a lot of people detest Jar-Jar Binks, but what Ian Doescher did with his character was to give him some depth. I liked this quite a bit. The pacing was uneve Short Review I've reviewed Ian Doescher's William Shakespeare's Star Wars original series, which I thoroughly enjoyed overall. The Phantom of Menace was good, but it had a lot of missed opportunities. For one, whole scenes were deleted (the funeral of Qui-Gon Jinn), which could have had some lovely asides from Anakin and Obi-Wan both. I know a lot of people detest Jar-Jar Binks, but what Ian Doescher did with his character was to give him some depth. I liked this quite a bit. The pacing was uneven in this book, compared to the others (but a lot of it is because of the material it was based on). I still loved the illustrations, but the last illustration was very telling with the way Palpatine, Anakin, and Obi-Wan were drawn. I enjoyed this start of the prequel series, but it wasn't as good as I had hoped.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    Hilarious! I’m not sure what else I can say. Ian Doescher does an amazing job taking the stories we all know and love yet putting a new spin on them. In this one for example, I loved Jar Jar. I really like the way his character was handled and developed. I only got one of the Samuel L Jackson references but it was still fun to look for them. I don’t know how this guy does it. He’s brilliant. Even the podrace worked as part of the play. Oh and I will always and forever love Artoo. Qui-Gon’s death Hilarious! I’m not sure what else I can say. Ian Doescher does an amazing job taking the stories we all know and love yet putting a new spin on them. In this one for example, I loved Jar Jar. I really like the way his character was handled and developed. I only got one of the Samuel L Jackson references but it was still fun to look for them. I don’t know how this guy does it. He’s brilliant. Even the podrace worked as part of the play. Oh and I will always and forever love Artoo. Qui-Gon’s death scene was really witty too. Well, really the whole thing is witty and wonderful and.... Wait a minute. Why are you reading my review???? You should be reading this book!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Lahn

    Another wonderful adventure through this strange hybrid universe merging Star Wars with Shakespeare. Once again, the cleverness with which Ian Doescher weaves Shakespeare's trademark wit and wordplay into familiar dialogue is incredible, and I frequently laughed out loud at certain turns of phrase. I wish I'd been able to enjoy this in audio form the way I did the first 3, but it was still a very enjoyable reading experience. Already pre-ordered the next two! Another wonderful adventure through this strange hybrid universe merging Star Wars with Shakespeare. Once again, the cleverness with which Ian Doescher weaves Shakespeare's trademark wit and wordplay into familiar dialogue is incredible, and I frequently laughed out loud at certain turns of phrase. I wish I'd been able to enjoy this in audio form the way I did the first 3, but it was still a very enjoyable reading experience. Already pre-ordered the next two!

  20. 4 out of 5

    The Batman (Reagan)

    Even those that loathe Jar Jar Bink's very existence would find Ian Doescher's take on him here to be pretty funny. Also, the filler scene where two random Jedi predict the decline in technology between the prequels and the original series is hilarious. Have I mentioned I love these books? Even those that loathe Jar Jar Bink's very existence would find Ian Doescher's take on him here to be pretty funny. Also, the filler scene where two random Jedi predict the decline in technology between the prequels and the original series is hilarious. Have I mentioned I love these books?

  21. 5 out of 5

    Krystle

    3.5 stars.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anita Heveron

    I have never laughed so hard, never enjoyed reading iambic pentameter so much, never felt more like a nerd than when reading this book. An amazing job, even made Jar Jar bearable!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Zach

    Once again, these books are amazing. I even liked Jar Jar how he is depicted here. Also loved the Liam Neeson reference towards the end. Love this series, highly recommend.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michael Campbell

    Okay, I'm not the biggest Shakespeare fan. I haven't read anything by him since school, and I've been to one Shakespeare play(Macbeth which I did like). I've just never gotten around to reading the bard, but this book was genuinely funny despite that. Obviously if you aren't a Star Wars fan, skip it, but I don't think you have to be a Shakespeare buff to get a laugh out of it. Several lines made me wheeze, but it was steadily humorous throughout. (view spoiler)["Et tu, Sith? Then fall, Qui-Gon J Okay, I'm not the biggest Shakespeare fan. I haven't read anything by him since school, and I've been to one Shakespeare play(Macbeth which I did like). I've just never gotten around to reading the bard, but this book was genuinely funny despite that. Obviously if you aren't a Star Wars fan, skip it, but I don't think you have to be a Shakespeare buff to get a laugh out of it. Several lines made me wheeze, but it was steadily humorous throughout. (view spoiler)["Et tu, Sith? Then fall, Qui-Gon Jinn!" is one of the most hilarious lines I've read this year. (hide spoiler)]

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    The Phantom Menace has been widely regarded as the worst of the Star Wars film saga and one of the biggest reasons is JAR JAR BINKS who has polarized fans. I was a bit worried and excited to see how would Doescher take on this character and the rest of the CGI-visual fest. This retelling of Episode I brings back the wonderful prose and iambic pentameter from the previous episodes, but it fails to bring life the messy plot of TPM to life successfully. I don't blame Doescher because he wasn't give The Phantom Menace has been widely regarded as the worst of the Star Wars film saga and one of the biggest reasons is JAR JAR BINKS who has polarized fans. I was a bit worried and excited to see how would Doescher take on this character and the rest of the CGI-visual fest. This retelling of Episode I brings back the wonderful prose and iambic pentameter from the previous episodes, but it fails to bring life the messy plot of TPM to life successfully. I don't blame Doescher because he wasn't given much to work with, but he does a decent job of dealing with Jar Jar and the lackluster film. As a child I loved The Phantom Menace with the podracing and Darth Maul scenes because it was a visual feast. The action scenes in the previous episodes were so well-done, but here I just couldn't appreciate them. All of the scenes were extremely hard to visualize especially the podracing one and it just didn't feel right having "messengers" tell of the action. It was a clever, original idea but I just felt so removed from all of the actionpacked scenes. Jar-Jar Binks is smarter here than in the prequel trilogy, making verbose asides that speak of a far more knowledgeable creature than we're used to. One minute he talks like a Gungan (meeeesa) and then he's discussing how everyone thinks that he's such a lowly creature. The treatment of his character with the asides is similar to the way R2D2 was handled previously, but it just didn't work for me with Jar Jar. I just couldn't wrap my head around a Jar Jar who was remotely intelligent and I became irritated with him more than once. Ian Doescher does give The Phantom Of Menace his all, but you can't build a mansion with blueprints for a cottage. I do give him credit for making TPM palatable and entertaining at times, but it's not his fault that the source material is mediocre. I'm looking forward to reading the following installments in the prequel trilogy which will serve Doescher much better I'm sure. Attack Of The Clones and Revenge Of The Sith are far better films and I have a feeling I'll enjoy their adaptations much better.This review was originally posted on Bookish Antics

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tony Laplume

    Here's an admission to kick things off: I'm one of those odd fans of Star Wars who grew up with the classic trilogy and liked the prequels anyway. Yes, including The Phantom Menace. And Jar Jar Binks... This might be the only Shakespeare Star Wars that I read, not because I was not impressed with Phantom of Menace (clearly I was, so the stars indicate; no war necessary here), but because, I think, this is in fact the ideal adaptation to sample, if sample is all you end up doing. Which is also bril Here's an admission to kick things off: I'm one of those odd fans of Star Wars who grew up with the classic trilogy and liked the prequels anyway. Yes, including The Phantom Menace. And Jar Jar Binks... This might be the only Shakespeare Star Wars that I read, not because I was not impressed with Phantom of Menace (clearly I was, so the stars indicate; no war necessary here), but because, I think, this is in fact the ideal adaptation to sample, if sample is all you end up doing. Which is also brilliant. (Although I'd caution Quirk not to do what it did after the likewise brilliant Pride & Prejudice & Zombies, which was to flood the market with other such efforts, possibly none of which were nearly as inspired.) Getting back to Jar Jar, he's easily the biggest revelation in Doescher's deft hands. Damned as a buffoon by fans, Binks is turned into the real phantom of this opera as the only character with extensive awareness as to what's really going on, including inside his own head. Between this and a recent theory that Binks might actually have secretly been the eponymous menace, it's a good time to revisit this particular movie all around. The only real complaint I have is when Doescher explains in an afterword that he slipped a few slide nods for Samuel L. Jackson fans into Mace Windu's dialogue, which amount to name-checking some of his movies. (No Pulp Fiction references, alas.) Of greater interest for readers will be deciphering the nods to Shakespeare, most of which are lost to those who aren't as well-versed with the Bard as they are Star Wars, likely. Whether you like Phantom Menace already or hate it with a passion, and intend to read this only for completest sake, I think you'll be pleasantly surprised. Don't pin the result on a lack of George Lucas, because it's still his story and dialogue (which itself was blamed for half the mess). Just a little altered. Forsooth!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

    Unless you’ve been living in a Wampa’s ice cave on the remote planet of Hoth, I’d wager you’re familiar with the Star Wars universe. You also probably know a thing or two about William Shakespeare as it's required reading in most high school English classes. In The Phantom of Menace, Ian Doescher retells George Lucas’s original story through the iambic pentameter of William Shakespeare, and it's absolutely brilliant. As a slightly obsessed fan of the original Star Wars movie trilogy, I have to co Unless you’ve been living in a Wampa’s ice cave on the remote planet of Hoth, I’d wager you’re familiar with the Star Wars universe. You also probably know a thing or two about William Shakespeare as it's required reading in most high school English classes. In The Phantom of Menace, Ian Doescher retells George Lucas’s original story through the iambic pentameter of William Shakespeare, and it's absolutely brilliant. As a slightly obsessed fan of the original Star Wars movie trilogy, I have to confide that I’m less a fan of the prequels. Admittedly, The Phantom Menace introduced some very cool characters like Darth Maul and Qui-Gon Jinn but nothing could redeem the introduction of the most reviled character in Star Wars history, Jar Jar Binks. Dare I confess that I enjoyed William Shakespeare’s The Phantom of Menace more than the film? I did, mainly because this version throws a new spin on Jar Jar that I thoroughly enjoyed. Another character I connected to in this volume that I didn’t in the movie was Anakin Skywalker. Doescher‘s writing instills in him a level of heartwarming depth that I felt was sorely missing in the film. The Phantom of Menace is packed with action, humor, and unexpected emotion. Complimenting the story are many gorgeous illustrations by the talented Nicolas Delort. To read the entire review, please visit The Qwillery by going to the following link: http://qwillery.blogspot.com/2015/04/...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Natália

    The Phantom Menace is that movie that I honestly pretend that never happened in our lives, since it doesn't bring much to connect with the other movies. In the case of this book it was better, but I still were pretty bored at some parts. Thank God that the author always makes it funnier and add things that doesn't sound out of context. Jar Jar Binks (which is a bit different and cooler in this book) is still a very annoying character, and it's terrible to think that he has more lines and depth t The Phantom Menace is that movie that I honestly pretend that never happened in our lives, since it doesn't bring much to connect with the other movies. In the case of this book it was better, but I still were pretty bored at some parts. Thank God that the author always makes it funnier and add things that doesn't sound out of context. Jar Jar Binks (which is a bit different and cooler in this book) is still a very annoying character, and it's terrible to think that he has more lines and depth than Darth Maul... (how badass) Qui-Gon is another character that it was promising and I think they wasted a great oportunity to make a very vey VERY cool movie if they had given more background for him, and of course, having Anakin as a main character (he's f***ing Darth Vader, c'mon). The movie is just a mess of nothings, so it's kind hard for me to give it more than 3 stars for its book. Anyways, Ian Doescher's books are still awesome and clever and oh yes, quite funny 💗 Ps: In case u love this movie, just don't take it personally. It's just my opinion :)

  29. 5 out of 5

    meghann

    I have the original trilogy version of these books, but I was a bit slower getting the ones for episodes one through three. I guess I just try to deny their existence, or something. But I should not have waited so long, as this book was hilarious. Freaking Jar Jar is incredibly intelligent and only acts like an idiot to manipulate the Jedi into doing what he wants. And R2-D2 continues to have an amazing internal monologue. Then I got to this part and laughed long and hard: image bbcode Amazing I have the original trilogy version of these books, but I was a bit slower getting the ones for episodes one through three. I guess I just try to deny their existence, or something. But I should not have waited so long, as this book was hilarious. Freaking Jar Jar is incredibly intelligent and only acts like an idiot to manipulate the Jedi into doing what he wants. And R2-D2 continues to have an amazing internal monologue. Then I got to this part and laughed long and hard: image bbcode Amazing. I bought books two and three as well and look forward to reading those. And I am so excited for the one that corresponds with The Force Awakens being released later this year.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Forsyth

    I'll be honest - my first thought was "why?" I had really hoped that the Shakespeare Star Wars series would just do the original films, but I forgot one thing: Ian Doescher is a very, very funny man. This book crackles with wit and wordplay, and actually made me want to revisit the film - no mean feat! I loved reading the 'Taken' speech in iambic pentameter, hearing Anakin channel Humphrey Bogart, and all the other sly little fun that these books have consistently delivered. Doescher acknowledge I'll be honest - my first thought was "why?" I had really hoped that the Shakespeare Star Wars series would just do the original films, but I forgot one thing: Ian Doescher is a very, very funny man. This book crackles with wit and wordplay, and actually made me want to revisit the film - no mean feat! I loved reading the 'Taken' speech in iambic pentameter, hearing Anakin channel Humphrey Bogart, and all the other sly little fun that these books have consistently delivered. Doescher acknowledges in his afterword that the elephant in the room is Jar Jar Binks, and to my mind he tackles it perfectly, playing him as the wise fool. I can't believe it, but I'm actually looking forward to reading the other prequel books now. This might be the best entry in the series yet.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.