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Cult Sci-Fi Movies: Discover the 10 Best Intergalactic, Astonishing, Far-Out, and Epic Cinema Classics

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Cult Sci-Fi Movies is a collection of 10 essays that examine, dissect, defend, and exalt the greats of classic cult sci-fi films. Film geeks, cinema snobs, VHS collectors, and anyone else who likes their entertainment a little on the weird side will appreciate author Danny Peary’s in-depth approach to their favorite sci-fi films ranging from Barbarella to Liquid Sky.


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Cult Sci-Fi Movies is a collection of 10 essays that examine, dissect, defend, and exalt the greats of classic cult sci-fi films. Film geeks, cinema snobs, VHS collectors, and anyone else who likes their entertainment a little on the weird side will appreciate author Danny Peary’s in-depth approach to their favorite sci-fi films ranging from Barbarella to Liquid Sky.

30 review for Cult Sci-Fi Movies: Discover the 10 Best Intergalactic, Astonishing, Far-Out, and Epic Cinema Classics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Strömquist

    Surprisingly good short freebie (from multiple sources, Amazon, Kobobooks...) with selections from the authors previous offerings on Cult movies. Peary writes really well and offers good and personal insights and certainly invoking an appetite to check out (or re-watch) the 'cult' movies herein. Most entertaining are the improbable synopsis - reading them in print makes me doubt that someone actually made these movies - and that includes the ones I've seen! The best essay is on the very last mov Surprisingly good short freebie (from multiple sources, Amazon, Kobobooks...) with selections from the authors previous offerings on Cult movies. Peary writes really well and offers good and personal insights and certainly invoking an appetite to check out (or re-watch) the 'cult' movies herein. Most entertaining are the improbable synopsis - reading them in print makes me doubt that someone actually made these movies - and that includes the ones I've seen! The best essay is on the very last movie, 'Zardoz', which the author really did not like. I did sit through that one on account of being a huge James Bond/Sean Connery fan and now I'm having a hard time deciding on seeing it again or letting it sink even further in the murky depths of memory where it will do least harm...

  2. 4 out of 5

    John Spiller

    You can get this sampler for free on Amazon, so it is a good "try before you buy" any of Peary's other books, of which I can recommend any of his "Cult Movie" compendium of reviews. The book title is misleading, though. I don't think that Peary considers these 10 movies to be the "Best" Cult Sci-Fi movies. Rather, these are 10 Cult Sc-Fi movies that are commonly considered to be the best, and Peary provides in-depth reviews of them. I believe that all 10 of these reviews previously appeared in C You can get this sampler for free on Amazon, so it is a good "try before you buy" any of Peary's other books, of which I can recommend any of his "Cult Movie" compendium of reviews. The book title is misleading, though. I don't think that Peary considers these 10 movies to be the "Best" Cult Sci-Fi movies. Rather, these are 10 Cult Sc-Fi movies that are commonly considered to be the best, and Peary provides in-depth reviews of them. I believe that all 10 of these reviews previously appeared in Cult Movies, Cult Movies 2, and Cult Movies 3, all of which are out of print. I like Peary's reviews because they are typically nuanced. Even with films he holds in high esteem, he will point out the flaws. He is not afraid to call bullsh*t on those films that have entered into the cult canon that are not really deserving. I typically find that reading a Peary review of a movie I have seen I will receive an insight I would have never considered. The one odd thing I find about Peary's reviews are his capsule summary of the movie plots that precede the review. While the summaries are accurate, they are written in a way that makes the movie seem almost unappealing.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    The author of this book somehow managed to make some of the most interesting of movies seem extremely boring. It read like a third rate college thesis, pretentiously written and full of references to other marginally related movies. A review of Forbidden Planet may have references to anything from Citizen Kane to the Wizard of Oz and for no other reason than to sound profound. Well, it didn't work. It sounded highly pretentious. At one point, he even points out how a movie should have been writt The author of this book somehow managed to make some of the most interesting of movies seem extremely boring. It read like a third rate college thesis, pretentiously written and full of references to other marginally related movies. A review of Forbidden Planet may have references to anything from Citizen Kane to the Wizard of Oz and for no other reason than to sound profound. Well, it didn't work. It sounded highly pretentious. At one point, he even points out how a movie should have been written because, of course, his opinion is so important, him being a sports reporter, by the way. The writing has ASSHOLE written all over it. These are classic movies. Some good. Some bad, but classics nonetheless. If they had been done in any way other than the way they WERE done, they would not be classic. A person with no appreciation for them should not be writing books about them.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    If you love classic, campy sci-fi movies, this is the book for you. Peary has a relaxed style and doesn't take any of this too seriously. He is, however, knowledgeable about many of behind-the-scenes events that affected the way those movies were made and/or perceived. Will you be disappointed that your personal favorite cult sci-fi movie is not included? Yes, but there are other volumes coming out.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Othniel

    Bite-sized selection of essays from across Peary's range of "cult" movie books. Each starting with a detailed story synopsis, these pieces are learned without being scholarly, and Peary is not afraid to be critical or irreverent in respect of received opinion on films in this genre from the classic ("Blade Runner") to the obscure ("Liquid Sky"). A stimulating read, offering some valuable insights.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Martin Lukanov

    This short collection of essays advertises that it'll introduce the reader to some of the best cult sci-fi movies, yet it manages to do neither. Not only does the writer actually like only about half of the films (he seems to hate Zardoz) but also only a few of them can be considered as actual "cult" movies (2001)... Also, though very easy to read, most of the essays are written in a style that manages to be extremely pretentious and vulgar all at the same time.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    Have viewed all 10 films discussed. Fine synopsis and general review by the author. Mostly agreed with his views. They are indeed cult classics in the genre.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Crawford

    The author points out that there is a continuing argument about cult films as to terms of quality, themes, talent and so on. He then goes on to list what he considers to be ten cult films including a lot of basic information as to when it was made, who made it and who was in it. First, the ones I've actually seen: Barbarella: I really liked this crazy and rather sexy Jane Fonda movie. It was all tease, of course, and with a weird plot but it was still a lot of fun. Five Million Years to Earth: A bl The author points out that there is a continuing argument about cult films as to terms of quality, themes, talent and so on. He then goes on to list what he considers to be ten cult films including a lot of basic information as to when it was made, who made it and who was in it. First, the ones I've actually seen: Barbarella: I really liked this crazy and rather sexy Jane Fonda movie. It was all tease, of course, and with a weird plot but it was still a lot of fun. Five Million Years to Earth: A black-and-white film that is science fiction but really with a strong amount of horror in it. The plot stretches things a little but it still works. It's also one that I think works well just as it is and shouldn't be colorized. Forbidden Planet: He really, really doesn't like this one but I really like it. He has a long list of criticisms but, to me, sometimes it's best just to enjoy a movie and not try to pick it to pieces later. 2001: A Space Odyssey: A very weird movie which supports the idea that many people have that aliens somehow interfered in the evolution of humans in the past (although there is absolutely no scientific proof that such a thing happened.) I'm not a fan of this film, comparing it to the first Star Trek movie as being over done and trying to dazzle with special effects rather than reasonable plot. Then, the films I haven't seen include Blade Runner, A Boy and His Dog, Dark Star, Liquid Sky, The Man Who Fell to Earth and Zardoz.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ralph

    application of personal likes and dislikes, biases and prejudices. Probably that is nowhere more evidenced than in the field of “cult” films, those movies that failed in general, but have found a niche audience, those die-hard fans willing to wait in lines on rainy nights for midnight showings, or chance losing their few friends by defending the indefensible. And those who find such a film are overjoyed when they come across a like-minded soul. As the author of this book writes: “There is nothin application of personal likes and dislikes, biases and prejudices. Probably that is nowhere more evidenced than in the field of “cult” films, those movies that failed in general, but have found a niche audience, those die-hard fans willing to wait in lines on rainy nights for midnight showings, or chance losing their few friends by defending the indefensible. And those who find such a film are overjoyed when they come across a like-minded soul. As the author of this book writes: “There is nothing more exciting than discovering you are not the only person obsessed with a picture the critics hate, the public stays away from en masse, and film texts ignore.” As to just what kind of a film might become a cult classic, that’s hard to pin down, for there are plenty of films that bomb at the box office and flit through our minds never to be recalled again. The author writes: “The typical Hollywood product has little potential for becoming a cult favorite because it is perceived by everyone in practically the same way.”…in other words, sometimes a bad film is just a bad film, and there it dies. In this book, author Danny Peary gives us overviews and analyses of “…the 10 best intergalactic, astonishing, far-out, and epic cinema classics.” Since he notes from the beginning that appreciation, or condemnation, of any film is entirely subjective, he should not be surprised that others might disagree with his choices. Of the ten films chosen for this book, I would concede that seven are probably actual cult movies, though I would only list four as being (possibly) in the top ten. Though they have their rabid fans, I don’t see “Five Million Years to Earth,” “Forbidden Planet,” or “2001: A Space Odyssey” as being true cult films. They are too popular, too critically acclaimed, too discussed as far as meaning, if only because they have been sliced and diced by anyone and everyone with an opinion, even if there is no consensus as to meaning, especially with “2001.” I would put “Blade Runner” on the edge of being a cult film, but I’ll agree that it is more one than it is not, and that it is one of the top ten. Others I would allow in the top number would be “Dark Star,” “Zardoz” and “A Boy and His Dog.” Others I would admit as being cultish, but not in the top: “Barbarella” (ugh!), “Liquid Sky” and “The Man Who Fell to Earth.” You’ll probably disagree with me, and the author, which is not unexpected since it really is all subjective. You have your own cult favorites that didn’t make it to the list, just as I have mine. Despite your (or my) disagreement with the author’s choices, it’s undeniable that he does an excellent job of giving an overall review of each film and providing background information. Where he excels, however, is in his analyses of the films and the people involved. As much as I dislike “Barbarella,” “Liquid Sky,” and “A Boy and His Dog” I have to admit the analyses were mesmerizing, especially in the case of “Barbarella,” where he effectively psychoanalyzed Jane Fonda and the director, Roger Vadim. His justifications for the inclusion of these particular films are persuasive, but ultimately doomed to failure because facts and mere logic are helpless in the face of personal opinion. Whether you find yourself in agreement or at odds with the writer’s opinions, you will be entertained and challenged by this book,

  10. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    A selection of 10 essays on the titled genre from Peary's classic Cult Movies series, revived in a series of genre-specific ebooks now. There are breezy, enjoyable, sometimes contrarian essays that dissect appeal, themes, and cultural importance, but not academically. Half of the page count is probably devoted to plot summaries, which made some sense when tracking down these films was difficult, but isn't particularly necessary in today's world where all of the discussed films are easily availab A selection of 10 essays on the titled genre from Peary's classic Cult Movies series, revived in a series of genre-specific ebooks now. There are breezy, enjoyable, sometimes contrarian essays that dissect appeal, themes, and cultural importance, but not academically. Half of the page count is probably devoted to plot summaries, which made some sense when tracking down these films was difficult, but isn't particularly necessary in today's world where all of the discussed films are easily available to the reader who would want to watch them.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rob Foster

    Well written. Too short. 50 films would have been nice. Ten is a sampler.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Derek Zack

  13. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Finnie

  14. 5 out of 5

    Robert Evans

  15. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dejo

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mr J Faichney

  18. 5 out of 5

    Virginia

  19. 5 out of 5

    The Pidgeon

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lee Hooley

  21. 4 out of 5

    Hugo Casamor

  22. 5 out of 5

    charles brown

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rob Young

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joni Budianto

  25. 4 out of 5

    David Birt

  26. 5 out of 5

    scott

  27. 4 out of 5

    Len White

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lorien

  29. 5 out of 5

    Steven Miscandlon

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

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