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Welcome to a world where everything seems normal. At least, at first. But the sinister and truly terrifying lurk just beneath the surface. Like a bathtub with a history so haunted, no one dares get in it. . . or an ordinary-looking camera that does unspeakable things to its subjects. . .or a mysterious computer game that has terrible consequences if you lose. . . . From the Welcome to a world where everything seems normal. At least, at first. But the sinister and truly terrifying lurk just beneath the surface. Like a bathtub with a history so haunted, no one dares get in it. . . or an ordinary-looking camera that does unspeakable things to its subjects. . .or a mysterious computer game that has terrible consequences if you lose. . . . From the creator of the blockbuster Alex Rider Adventures and The Diamond Brothers Mysteries, Horowitz Horror is a wicked collection of macabre tales sure to send shivers up your spine. This edition includes; 1. Bath Night 2. Killer Camera 3. Light Moves 4. The Night Bus 5. Harriet's Horrible Dream 6. Scared 7. A Career in Computer Games 8. The Man with the Yellow Face 9. The Monkey's Ear


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Welcome to a world where everything seems normal. At least, at first. But the sinister and truly terrifying lurk just beneath the surface. Like a bathtub with a history so haunted, no one dares get in it. . . or an ordinary-looking camera that does unspeakable things to its subjects. . .or a mysterious computer game that has terrible consequences if you lose. . . . From the Welcome to a world where everything seems normal. At least, at first. But the sinister and truly terrifying lurk just beneath the surface. Like a bathtub with a history so haunted, no one dares get in it. . . or an ordinary-looking camera that does unspeakable things to its subjects. . .or a mysterious computer game that has terrible consequences if you lose. . . . From the creator of the blockbuster Alex Rider Adventures and The Diamond Brothers Mysteries, Horowitz Horror is a wicked collection of macabre tales sure to send shivers up your spine. This edition includes; 1. Bath Night 2. Killer Camera 3. Light Moves 4. The Night Bus 5. Harriet's Horrible Dream 6. Scared 7. A Career in Computer Games 8. The Man with the Yellow Face 9. The Monkey's Ear

30 review for Horowitz Horror: Stories You'll Wish You Never Read

  1. 4 out of 5

    Marco

    I have read countless short story collections but this collection and its sequel are ones I favour the most. This is because of two reasons; When I was like 6 or 7, I used to pop around our local library and borrow the smaller collections of these stories - the thin little books with two or three stories in each volume. I've loved them ever since and have since, bought a copy for myself. Second reason? These stories at the same time, were coldly-humoured, chilling and sort of freaky in a way and s I have read countless short story collections but this collection and its sequel are ones I favour the most. This is because of two reasons; When I was like 6 or 7, I used to pop around our local library and borrow the smaller collections of these stories - the thin little books with two or three stories in each volume. I've loved them ever since and have since, bought a copy for myself. Second reason? These stories at the same time, were coldly-humoured, chilling and sort of freaky in a way and simply great quick reads. There are 9 stories in this first volume - Bath Night - 5/5 This story revolves around a haunted bath bought in an antique store. Where Anthony Horowitz gets these odd ideas, I don't know. I found this story rather eerie - well plotted, surprise ending - overall, a good story and probably the scariest in the collection. Killer Camera - 4/5 What if a certain camera has been imbued with dark magic and anything the camera photographs gets destroyed. And what if someone just took a picture of... Don't worry, I won't spoil it for you. This story is one of my favourites; its intriguing, well plotted but the only reason I didn't give this five stars is because the premise of an evil camera isn't original enough and has been done countless times - from Goosebumps to Are You Afraid of the Dark?. But I will tell you one thing - be sure to expect a chilling ending. Light Moves - 4/5 A computer taken from a deceased horse-racing journalist has the power to predict horse-racing winners and even - the future. I must admit I was fascinated by the premise of this - and it didn't disappoint me. Much recommended. The Night Bus - 5/5 Even as a child, this has always been my clear favourite - this story follows two brothers who board a sinister night bus who has no intentions in taking them home. What can I say? Great plot, great writing and great ending. Harriet's Horrible Dream - 3/5 A girl has a gruesome little dream - but its only a dream, right? The build up to the climax was well plotted, I must admit but the ending was disappointing and much expected. Good, nevertheless. Scared - 3/5 A boy who defaces Mother Nature gets his comeuppance when he finds he is lost in the middle of the countryside. The story built up well and the ending is sure to shock. A Career In Computer Games - 5/5 I've always loved computers - and a good horror story at that too. Join the two together, and you get one of my favourite titles from this book - 'A Career In Computer Games'. The story follows a boy who loves computer games and finds the perfect job for him - he gets to play computer games all day! Little does he know that sometimes that isn't a good thing. Great story, easy to understand - but my only complaint would be about the fact that it sort of resembles the TV episode of Are You Afraid of the Dark, 'The Tale of the Pinball Wizard', who meets the same fate as the protagonist in this story. Nevertheless, it is written well enough to deserve the five stars. The Man With The Yellow Face - 3/5 A boy gets a picture taken in a photo booth while waiting for a train. When he recieves these photos, he finds a sinister photo of a yellow faced man in the middle of his photos. What could this possibly mean? Creepy? YES. Well plotted? YES. Predictable? Unfortunately, YES. A good story, but the fact that I practically guessed the whole story within the first few pages ruined it. The Monkey's Ear - 4/5 In a slight twist of W.W. Jacob's 'The Monkey's Paw', a boy obtains a monkey's ear on his holiday. Its supposed to be able to grant 3 wishes - but the thing is, the ear is partially deaf - or is it? Great story, great ending - top notch last story. How does the markings go? 1/5 - 0 2/5 - 0 3/5 - 3 - 9/45 4/5 - 3 - 12/45 5/5 - 3 - 15/45 ------------------- TOTAL 9 - 35/45 Well that settles it, there are 3 mediocre stories, 3 good stories and 3 excellent stories to look forward to. An excellent collection to add to your bookshelf - it gets a combined score of 36/45 which is a rating of about 4/5. Thanks for reading!, Marco.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    9 absolutely stunning horror stories at the very best. Normally you always skip some stories in an anthology but not here. I really enjoyed every single story: the haunted bathtub, the eerie nightbus, the camera with a built in special effect, Light moves... every story hits the point and has some great twist. The author really knows how to write a compelling story with a nasty twist. Just killers, no fillers. Must read!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Arun Divakar

    The first horror story I remember reading was Dracula in its English version but truth be told I couldn’t make any sense out of it. Imagine for a moment a ten or eleven year old kid who has not had any exposure to reading other than Enid Blyton and Hardy Boys trying his hand at an unabridged version of Dracula. The conclusion can quite obviously be drawn that the book almost put me to sleep in the first try. It was quite a while later that I read a Malayalam translation of the work which did app The first horror story I remember reading was Dracula in its English version but truth be told I couldn’t make any sense out of it. Imagine for a moment a ten or eleven year old kid who has not had any exposure to reading other than Enid Blyton and Hardy Boys trying his hand at an unabridged version of Dracula. The conclusion can quite obviously be drawn that the book almost put me to sleep in the first try. It was quite a while later that I read a Malayalam translation of the work which did appear watered down a bit but did not lose even a bit of its brooding and terrifying aura. This is quite a nasty habit of mine that totally unrelated images from the past pop up as I sit down to write and stitching them into the review is something I love doing. This one however made a weird sort of sense now that I think about it. A short story collection such as this if discovered during my childhood days might have brought me much closer to horror as a genre. Horowitz successfully puts together a collection of shorts aimed at a young audience who might just be getting their introduction into the space of the horror short story. There are a few themes in this book which interestingly recur across multiple tales. The first is the use of common place items as objects of dread. A safe and serene household undergoes brutal transformations under the spell of such items. They might seem harmless enough – a camera, a computer, a bath tub and so on but the havoc they wreak in the lives of people is rather unimaginable. The second recurring theme is of karma catching up with boys and a lady (that again was an amusing part, all the bullies and baddies are young men and in one odd tale a cantankerous and caustic woman) who have been particularly nasty in their lives through the most supernatural ways possible. While they seem to relish in their ways of being rude and overall bullies, karma does repay them in kind in these tales. The way these stories are written, I did feel that the author does seem to enjoy meting out these retributions on them. The third and last theme I observed was of innocent bystanders getting caught in the backdraft of circumstances and forces that are inexplicable. Here again the bewilderment and helplessness of the people involved are captured well by the author in sometimes horrifying and in a couple of stories, darkly comical tones. If you are a younger reader starting off on horror, this would be a good point to start. If you are an adult, then sit back and enjoy a quick ride through stories that might have given you a chill if you read this as a kid. Recommended !

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lady Delacour

    Enjoyable, fun, somewhat creepy short stories. Some were humorous, others more mysterious. Narrator Simon Shepherd's performance was very good. His female voices were odd. Enjoyable, fun, somewhat creepy short stories. Some were humorous, others more mysterious. Narrator Simon Shepherd's performance was very good. His female voices were odd.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rocio Pritchett

    I read these stories to my students before Halloween. We turned off the lights and I read the part of a story, with voices, per day. Although they didn't mention liking them at the time, they talked about it for a month afterward. "Do you remember that voice you did for that creepy guy in that story? We had a sub who sounded Just like that, and I was creeped out all hour long!" Mission accomplished. I read these stories to my students before Halloween. We turned off the lights and I read the part of a story, with voices, per day. Although they didn't mention liking them at the time, they talked about it for a month afterward. "Do you remember that voice you did for that creepy guy in that story? We had a sub who sounded Just like that, and I was creeped out all hour long!" Mission accomplished.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Hafsa Sabira

    When I say that I like horror stories, I mean stories that scare me to the bones for their ominous effect altogether, not stories with horrific activities of a serial killer or a mentally disturbed person. So far I have realized that short horror stories create the greatest impact on me and even after a long time, when someone asks me to tell a story, I end up remembering a few of those stories which haunted me in the middle of the night. As for this book, this has every single element I look fo When I say that I like horror stories, I mean stories that scare me to the bones for their ominous effect altogether, not stories with horrific activities of a serial killer or a mentally disturbed person. So far I have realized that short horror stories create the greatest impact on me and even after a long time, when someone asks me to tell a story, I end up remembering a few of those stories which haunted me in the middle of the night. As for this book, this has every single element I look for in horror stories. It's a collection of Horowitz's horror stories and I felt like each story is scarier than the other. The best part about these stories is their beginning and ending lines. I have always felt that it takes a huge potential to choose the right sentences to begin and end a story. Just this simple credibility can turn the writing into a masterpiece and Horowitz has indeed mastered this art long ago. This is undoubtedly one of my most favourite horror story collection and I must say, I am feeling like giving it more than 5 stars.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Crofts

    I read this book many years ago and it was such a nostalgic read, I really enjoyed it. Some of the stories were actually a little spooky and rather silly in the best way, each one just as entertaining as the last.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kiwi Begs2Differ ✎

    Nice YA collection, although the book publication date is shown in the use of old technologies.

  9. 5 out of 5

    15HarrisonT

    I found this book very engaging and the story’s were good but i felt as if some of the story’s were a bit weird and weren’t very horror related

  10. 4 out of 5

    Klara

    I must admit, I judged this book by its cover. I am a fan of Anthony Horowitz, but I didn't pay attention to the book's author or description; the word "HORROR" boldly emblazoned on the spine and the bloody handprint dominating the cover were all it took for me to conclude I'd like the book. In this case, my first impression was fairly accurate: the book is a collection of horror stories, albeit none too horrible since the target audience is a younger once. Given that demographic, the stories' i I must admit, I judged this book by its cover. I am a fan of Anthony Horowitz, but I didn't pay attention to the book's author or description; the word "HORROR" boldly emblazoned on the spine and the bloody handprint dominating the cover were all it took for me to conclude I'd like the book. In this case, my first impression was fairly accurate: the book is a collection of horror stories, albeit none too horrible since the target audience is a younger once. Given that demographic, the stories' impact varies with readers' age and exposure to the genre. Whereas small children will likely find characters' invariably unpleasant fates truly frightening, older readers will likely be less moved, depending on how many horror stories they've encountered before. Longtime horror fans of any age might find it hard to shiver at all because the book draws heavily from classic scenarios that will likely seem familiar and predictable. The collection is still worth a look for the aforementioned longtime fans, though, because author Anthony Horowitz puts a distinctive spin on the older plotlines he employs. The "possessed item drives new owner mad" formula comes in the surprising form of a bathtub, for example, while the traditional "monkey's body part grants wish at terrible price" tale gets fresh humor. This means that while veteran horror fans might easily guess a story's ending, the ride there is still entertaining. The shock factor might not be there for older readers and longtime fans, moreover, but the collection can successfully foster a more prolonged sense of dread for savvy readers as they anticipate the a character's bitter end. In light of this, though younger fans will likely be the most enthusiastic about "Horowitz Horror," older fans can enjoy it as well.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Geert Daelemans

    Nine ltittle gems Horowitz Horror was first published in 1999 and contains nine short stories where the protagonist is predominantly a younger person, as such is seems to be written for a preadult audience. The nine stories: -When it's Bath Night Isabel has to deal with a rather hostile, old Victorian bath. -Do not by that Killer Camera, because is has a certain influence on the subjects it photographs. -The future is no secret anymore in Light Moves, but Ethan Sly should get worried when other peopl Nine ltittle gems Horowitz Horror was first published in 1999 and contains nine short stories where the protagonist is predominantly a younger person, as such is seems to be written for a preadult audience. The nine stories: -When it's Bath Night Isabel has to deal with a rather hostile, old Victorian bath. -Do not by that Killer Camera, because is has a certain influence on the subjects it photographs. -The future is no secret anymore in Light Moves, but Ethan Sly should get worried when other people notice his good luck. -You never know where The Night Bus will stop. -Luckily Harriet's Horrible Dream is only a dream, not? -A school bully gets Scared while walking through the countryside. -How doesn't want A Career in Computer Games, but be aware it might be a job for life. -The Man with the Yellow Face haunts a sinister photo booth, but is he maybe trying to tell you something? -The Monkey's Ear is pure rubbish, it can't even get its spells right. When Anthony Horowitz enters the world of creepy short stories, be warned that he will behave himself like a child in a candy store. It becomes very clear that his prefered habitat is the world of mystery and the supernatural, but the humour is never really far away. The nine easily digestible stories collected in this book are each little gems of guilty pleasure. It's not surprising that the stinger always comes at the end, because if Horowitz knows one thing, it's certainly the technique to plot a good suspense story. The mix of stories is so diverse that it is quite impossible to select your favourite. But rest assured, you will chuckle more than once. A must read for those horror buffs that are still young at heart.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Megan Wintrip

    This book contains 17 scary stories which are very creepy and twisted. I love books like this and I highly recommend it. From a ghost in a computer which predicts things, to a bone idol boy who gets trapped in an video game and a demon in a camera.. these unusual stories will get you thinking and make you think twice about things. I particularly liked the short story at the end! I thoroughly enjoyed the stories in the book, they were well written and all based in parts of the UK which is really ni This book contains 17 scary stories which are very creepy and twisted. I love books like this and I highly recommend it. From a ghost in a computer which predicts things, to a bone idol boy who gets trapped in an video game and a demon in a camera.. these unusual stories will get you thinking and make you think twice about things. I particularly liked the short story at the end! I thoroughly enjoyed the stories in the book, they were well written and all based in parts of the UK which is really nice as the other stories I have read in different books were in the US. If you like spooky stories you may like this.. so get your creep on and read it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ekel Adolf

    The horror stories in this volume are very clever and charming. Since Horowitz is mainly writing fiction for young adults, these stories seem to be aimed at a similar audience, but are entertaining for mature readers nonetheless. The last story is a humorous hommage to W. W. Jacob's "The Monkey's Paw" and especially worth a read. The horror stories in this volume are very clever and charming. Since Horowitz is mainly writing fiction for young adults, these stories seem to be aimed at a similar audience, but are entertaining for mature readers nonetheless. The last story is a humorous hommage to W. W. Jacob's "The Monkey's Paw" and especially worth a read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alexxy

    2.5 stars

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cameron Trost

    It's not always easy for an adult to give a YA book a fair review. The writing in these stories is simple and the theme of conflict between children and parents is perhaps over-exploited, but Anthony Horowitz achieves his objective. These are stories children can relate to. They take everyday situations, like playing computer games or going to a flea market, and put a nasty spin on them. Judging the book for what it is, a collection of nasty and creepy stories for young people, it deserves four It's not always easy for an adult to give a YA book a fair review. The writing in these stories is simple and the theme of conflict between children and parents is perhaps over-exploited, but Anthony Horowitz achieves his objective. These are stories children can relate to. They take everyday situations, like playing computer games or going to a flea market, and put a nasty spin on them. Judging the book for what it is, a collection of nasty and creepy stories for young people, it deserves four stars.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    Horowitz, it's been long.... too long! I had almost forgotten how I appreciate his style. From these 9 gems in this collection, the first - "Bath Night", might be the scariest and is still my favourite; The last - "The Monkey's Ear", without doubt the funniest! Such a fun read! Horowitz, it's been long.... too long! I had almost forgotten how I appreciate his style. From these 9 gems in this collection, the first - "Bath Night", might be the scariest and is still my favourite; The last - "The Monkey's Ear", without doubt the funniest! Such a fun read!

  17. 5 out of 5

    HowardHomeEd

    Out of the 9 short stories, I only really enjoyed, Killer Camera, Light Moves, and The Night Bus.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mark Ayre

    This was an easy read. The pacing was good with nothing unnecessary thrown in. The problem was there often wasn't much substance. You can say it's down to length but plots often felt rushed, and this isn't the case in all short stories. My other general problems with the series were that it wasn't frightening, and was often predictable. Maybe it's not scary because it's for younger readers, but I remember being 12. I would have wanted this book to scare me. As I wanted it to scare me as an adult. As This was an easy read. The pacing was good with nothing unnecessary thrown in. The problem was there often wasn't much substance. You can say it's down to length but plots often felt rushed, and this isn't the case in all short stories. My other general problems with the series were that it wasn't frightening, and was often predictable. Maybe it's not scary because it's for younger readers, but I remember being 12. I would have wanted this book to scare me. As I wanted it to scare me as an adult. As for predictability, each story ended with a reversal or twist. The problem was you could usually see these coming a mile off. Again, I'm an adult, but I'm not sure these would fool many 12 year-olds either. But, I don't want to put the series down. There were some decent tales in here and a couple of twists that did take me by surprise. So, let's get into it, starting with... Bath Night We open with a story that is well written and paced. Two arguing parents buy an antique bath which turns out to be evil. Isobel (our hero) realises this and attempts to destroy the haunted object. The story employs a well-worn horror cliche: an object haunted by a killer who once used said object when murdering his victims. How a killer has come to haunt an object they owned is rarely explained by horror writers. Horowitz is not an exception. There is also the classic YA/Children's fiction cliche on show here. The evil object only acts up in front of the child, never the parents. In Bath Night, Isobel is bathing in blood but, when her mother enters the room, it's back to water. Dick move, bath. Dick move. This doesn't make sense from a plot point of view. The killer is a killer. He has no reason to torment only the child. However, you can understand why writers have so long been using this trick. It keeps the kid isolated, and helps build the suspense. If you can suspend your disbelief, it works well again here. What doesn't work so well is the lack of roadblocks the character faces. In fiction writing, they say you should put your character up a tree, throw rocks at them, then let them down. In Bath Time, and many of the stories in this collection, there aren't enough rocks. For Isobel, a couple of horrible incidents (including the above) are enough. She heads back to the shop where they purchased the bath and, lo and behold, the first shop assistant she speaks to gives her what she needs. No fight. No needing to check. No lies. He just tells her the bloody history of the bath and sends her on her way. Of course, this is to keep the story short and helps to contextualise the climax that follows. A climax that, while exciting to an extent, offers little surprises or obstacles for Isobel. All in all a good story but not much thinking necessary. Don’t expect this to change further down the line. Out of the collection, this is our Bronze Medal story. 2. Bath Night Recently I read Goosebumps' Say Cheese and Die (released six years before Horowitz Horror). Killer Camera is in much the same vein as that and is as predictable. From the moment our hero, Matthew, sees the camera, you know it's going to be evil. It doesn't take the seller of the camera saying the owner's disappeared for you to know bad things will happen to the subject of any pictures. Like the first story, this is fast-paced. The problem is we want to see the camera in action, and Horowitz goes to some lengths to avoid a human subject. To the point that it just doesn't ring true. When Matt first buys the camera and wants to test it out, he doesn't pick a person at random to photograph; he picks a mirror (which promptly smashes). When Matt then gives the camera to his dad as a present, the latter professes it is too dark to take a picture of younger son Jamie. This would be fine if not for the fact he then takes a picture of a tree in the garden and the family dog. Is the tree filled with lanterns? Does the dog have a radioactive glow? It isn't explained why it is too dark to take a picture of Jamie but not a dog and tree, and it was a point I found jarring. However, if you can suspend your disbelief (a common theme in this collection), then there is a lot to like here. Not least the well-executed race against time climax which sees Matt return home to find his parents and brother have gone out with the camera. Desperate to save them, he races to find them, and the story ends with a nice twist which is clever, dark, and suitably surprising. 3. Light Moves The first of two first-person stories. A lot here is the same as the first couple of stories. What’s different is that the object of focus does not appear to be inherently evil. In fact, it begins as downright useful. This time our object is a computer, given to our hero (Henry) after it’s owner (a racing correspondent) has died at his desk. Not being an axe murderer (Bath Night) or a satanist (Killer Camera) the possessed computer seems less interested in murder. Instead, the ghost of journalist Ethan starts spitting out the winner of one horse race a day. Why does the columnist's death give him precognitive powers? Who knows, maybe the afterlife is timeless. It's never explained, so we suspend our disbelief again. In doing this, we have a story that rattles along. The tips work, but Henry is too young to bet. Because of this, he enlists the help of deranged older kid, Bill, to place the bets for him, splitting the winnings. This, as Henry's smart friend Leo warns him, is a terrible idea. It is clear from his first appearances that psycho Bill is not someone you want to do business with. But Henry, blinded by greed, is not apt to listen to the warning bells in his head, or to Leo. Such disregard for the warning signs leads to a climax in which Bill comes to steal the computer. Not much happens here, and the disappointing thing is that our hero steps aside and lets it happen. All this to facilitate a twist we saw coming. This story is not awful, but neither is it as good as the first two. It has a weak ending, and as in previous tales, some of the devices for moving the plot along are clunky. How does Henry find out what the word 'Casablanca', the first to appear on his screen, means? He walks past two teachers, one telling the other he won money on the horse Casablanca. Hmm, very likely. 4. The Night Bus One of a couple of tales where the story is the twist and the twist very good. Two boys trying to get home after a late night party jump on a night bus which is, alas, not the one from Harry Potter. The story is nothing more than one of the boys - Nick - watching people get on and off the bus, each arrival further spelling out the twist we got from their first conversation with the conductor upon arriving at the bus. As such, when this twist is finally 'revealed' by the mother, no one is very surprised or interested. 5. Harriet’s Horrible Dream As above, we all know what's coming here from very early on. This story has more substance but signals the first of three unbearable POV characters. In a row. Now, I'm all for an anti-hero, and characters we 'love to hate'. Frank Underwood and Patrick Bateman immediately spring to mind. This story, however, gives us Harriet. A spoilt snobby little girl who revels in getting her nannies fired and who is happy to leave her parents for a stranger the moment her father loses all their money. The intention here, presumably, is to get us to hate Harriet for reasons that become clear at the end of the tale. It works, but sitting in Harriet's head for 18 pages is still an intolerable experience. Especially when we know where we are going the whole time and are not surprised when we reach the end. 6. Scared The second of three stories with a thoroughly unlikeable main character. This tale's only saving grace is that we are stuck in Gary's head for just 11 pages - making it the shortest of the book. In those 11 pages, Horowitz treats us to a laundry list of terrible things our 'hero' has done. Ranging from being generally awful to his mother and grandmother, to opening a farm gate in the hope the cows will escape. Just when you think it can't get any worse, Gary admits to having stolen his favourite jacket from AN OXFAM SHOP. Yeah, Horowitz really wanted us to hate this one. The story itself is about Gary getting lost after going for a walk. You may not see the ending coming, but neither is it enjoyable. There is no climax, no excitement. Just an underwhelming end. I would give this tale the esteemed Worst Story Award. 7. A Career in Computer Games The final (thankfully) hateful character. Here we have an idiot thief whose crimes include (but are not limited to) stealing from his mother and throwing a brick at a cat for no reason. What a champ. The story involves our 'hero' - Kevin - signing up to test a new game. It's evident from the get-go something dodgy is going on, but Kevin isn't bothered. He hears two grand a week, and signs on the dotted line. The story from here is as you'd expect. His life becomes a game, and this gives Horowitz the chance to have some fun. He treats us to the most action-packed plot so far as Kevin tries to stay alive against numerous faceless killers on foot, bikes and in helicopters. There's not much more to it than that, but the ending involved an enjoyable twist. Yes, he's in a game, as you expected, but perhaps not in the way you expected. Not a great story in all, but the action and the last lines bring it well above the two that preceded it. 8. The Man with the Yellow Face The second of two first-person stories. A boy waiting at a platform gets some pics at a Photo Booth. Upon printing the photos, he finds the third of four pictures is not of him at all, but of an ugly man with a yellow face. This story proves that lack of pages does not mean a lack of suspense. Horowitz foreshadows the climax brilliantly here, and my heart pounded as I read towards it. The twist I guessed, but only moments before the reveal, and it was still satisfying. This story proves it is possible to be clever and build suspense, even over only a few pages. Although the twist is not quite as good as the one to follow, this is still my favourite story. Our Gold Award Winner. 9. Monkey Ear A take on the classic tale ‘The Monkey’s Paw’ (which is referenced here, albeit attributed to Edgar Allen Poe rather than W. W. Jacobs) but with a nice twist. The story starts with a family on holiday and not enjoying it. Looking for a taxi rank, they step into a shop. Here the shopkeep's nephew sells them a Monkey's Ear, saying it will grant four wishes. At home father, mother and son, place three wishes, although they don't believe they will work. In a way, the ear vindicates their disbelief. Something does happen after each wish, but it seemingly has nothing to do with the request made. I confess this one got me. I could not for the life of me see how we were getting from wish to result. It was driving me mad. In the end, and for the first time in this book, I needed the hero to spell it out to me. And, when the child Bart obliged, having worked it out himself after three wishes, I was impressed. And there was still one wish to go! Now, with the trick behind the Monkey's Ear revealed, there is one more surprise in store as father and son fight over who should get the final wish. Here Horowitz ends on a high point, with the best twist of the series coming right at the end. And this story, following our Gold Award, wins the Silver Medal. Verdict Nothing here will linger in the memory for long. But the series was an easy read and at least somewhat enjoyable throughout.

  19. 4 out of 5

    chapterchimera

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Nine short and snappy tales horror regarding haunted objects and terrible children getting their just deserved. Fans of Goosebumps and R.L Stine will definitely enjoy this book. My two favourites are “The Night Bus” and “The Man with the Yellow Face”. However, despite some chilling chapters and speedy scares some of the stories could have had greater potential and more depth. Below I have given my verdict on each story and my alternate view on what could have made it better. You can have quick lo Nine short and snappy tales horror regarding haunted objects and terrible children getting their just deserved. Fans of Goosebumps and R.L Stine will definitely enjoy this book. My two favourites are “The Night Bus” and “The Man with the Yellow Face”. However, despite some chilling chapters and speedy scares some of the stories could have had greater potential and more depth. Below I have given my verdict on each story and my alternate view on what could have made it better. You can have quick look at my thoughts and alternative views as you read each one. 🚨SPOILERS ALERT🚨 Bath night 2/5- Anthony uses effective imagery techniques to make the bath and Isabella’s visions horrifying and frightening. However, the premise of the story of a haunted item causing distress to the narrator is a extremely repetitive cliche that has been used in countless horror stories. Anthony ends the story with a prelude to Isabella being admitted to a mental hospital and Isabella’s dad developing murderous intentions. I feel this was too sudden a twist and wasn’t fully explained or justified. For example, why didn’t the bath affect Susan Martin? A better twist would have been if Belinda had sabotaged the bath and convinced her it was haunted because she was jealous of Isabella’s popularity. Because of this, Isabella slips and accidentally drowns in the bath from fear and anxiety. The narrative then shifts to Belinda thinking about how foolish and stupid Isabella was of thinking the bath was haunted whilst entering her own bathroom. This is until she pulls back the shower curtain to see the ghost of Isabella waiting for her revenge. Killer Camera- 1/5 A alternate version of R.L Stine’s bestseller “Say Cheese and Die”. I don’t necessarily mind when authors take inspiration from other stories as every good story is often inspired by another. However, I feel “Killer Camera’s” entire premise is exactly the same as “Say cheese and Die” with a camera snap that leads to misfortune to the objects or people snapped. I also feel that Matthews discovery of the contents of the film tape was heavily macabre and too dark-natured for a middle grade story. The ending twist was a unique surprise but theoretically speaking the King family would still be intact as they were not in the picture. It would have been better if Jamie had snapped a picture of Matthew when he wasn’t looking. The ending is Matthew’s diary entry anxiously detailing him waiting for what terrible fate will befall him. Light moves 1/5 A computer that successfully predicts racehorse winners was a interesting and unique idea. I also liked the moral consensus of the story that teaches kids a valuable lesson. However, I feel the story was overtly complicated and the ending leaves more questions then answers. Is the ghost of Ethan haunting the computer which is why it can predict the winners? Did the computer end up killing Ethan? Why didn’t Henry befall a similar fate? Did the computer target Ethan because of his poor behaviour? I feel it was a confusing version of “killer camera” with a haunted object causing misfortune to the user. It would have been better if after each prediction by the computer a loading bar is partially filled. Henry continues asking for predictions and the bar continues to rise until it is close to the limit. Ethan then steals the computer and asks for the final prediction which fills the bar completely and leads to his demise. The night bus 5/5 A ghoulish busload filled with the undead accidentally boarded by two naive young children. A Vividly imagined journey with the introduction of quirky characters makes this short story enticing and engaging. I really liked that the bus passengers consisted of ancient and recent undead people each entailing their unique stories. Rosemary’s final revelation is sure to send shivers down your spine long after finishing the story. My only criticism is that there were quite a few hints that the people on the bus were not living. There could have been a bigger shock factor had it been made less obvious that the passengers were dead. Also, it would have good if Nick and Jeremy nearly get run over by a car before they jump onto the bus. It would have been a good tie-in to how they were able to see the bus and get on board. Harriets Nightmare- 1/5 A terrible dream actually turns out to be reality for a spoilt girl. The story was predictable and it was obvious that Harriets bad behaviour would lead to some Calamity. The twist in the end wasn’t very effective as it just confirms the readers suspicion that it isn’t a dream. Would have been better if Harriets father owned the Sawney Bean and she had eaten from there many times. However, when she realises the actual ingredients used he has no choice but to make her part of the dish. The finale is Harriets Mother lamenting on her disappearance whilst her father gives her sarcastic reassurance whilst she enjoys her meal (supposedly Harriet) at at the restaurant. Scared 1/5 A simple tale about a ignorant teenager being punished for his behaviour. Also, there isn’t a explanation given as to why Gary became a scarecrow. Would have been better if Gary’s grandma warns him about nature’s creature and why he should respect the countryside. Gary ignores the warning and goes for a walk we’re he is ambushed by wasps, attacked by a bear and constantly tripped by moving grass. He finally returns to Pyre hall were he violently confronts his grandma about his ordeals. She discloses to him that she is the creature he was warned about and now he has returned she will make good of her warning. Gary is turned into a tree by his grandma and planted outside. Gary then has to endure the pain of seeing other ignorant children snap his branches and pull his leaves. A career in computer games- 2/5 Troublesome young people being taught a terrible lesson seems to be a continuous theme for Anthony in this book. Big corporate companies using unethical practices is somewhat common which gives a little bit of realism to the story. I also liked how Anthony challenges the myth of success without struggle. For example, Kevin genuinely believes he deserves a high-paying job and career despite his ignorance and lack of skills. It’s a myth that a lot of young people get sucked into which makes them make a lot of poor decisions in life. I feel the story could have been more developed particularly when Kevin becomes a part of the game. For example, the men in the suit shoot Kevin’s family and Kevin feels remorse for his past selfishness. Or Mr.Go puts Kevin into a false sense of security by making his first challenges easy. But as the difficult rises Kevin realises that he might not make it out alive. Also, Mr.Go specified that they needed him for a prototype game that they were producing. But at the end of the book Kevin is referenced to being in a arcade machine. I didn’t quite understand the quick transition between the two differing environments . The man with the yellow face- 5/5 Anthony seems to have a talent for telling superb horror stories about transport vehicles 😂. Excellent narrative, superb tension and a spine-tingling conclusion which brings focus to the whole storyline. From the minute Peter sees the picture of the deformed face smiling your instantly bombarded with horror and dread on it’s origins. The photo booth is presented as being haunted or a somewhat diabolical machine. I initially thought the story would pan out similar to “killer camera” or “bath night” with a object having a sinister origin story or motive. The story then continues and Peter sufferers the crash which leads to his facial deformation. I liked the nonchalant tone Anthony uses prior to the crash as many misfortunes in life often often occur without warning. Finally Peter reveals he is the man with the yellow face thirty years onwards looking in the mirror. It is stated in a nonchalant and positive manner which a complete contrast to his prior state of shock and disgust thirty years before. And this is one of the reasons I really enjoyed this story. Had seeing the picture somehow put Peter at emotional ease as it somehow prepared him for what was going to happen? Had he not seen the picture, with his parents going to divorce would the accident have tipped him over the edge psychologically? After all, the picture showed the old man smiling so was it a premonition of hope that things would work out eventually? These questions change the narrative of the story and provide it with more mystery and moral then horror and disgust. It becomes a short life lesson of being grateful of what you have and making the best of the situations you find yourself in. The Monkey’s Ear- 1/5 A wish granting object that isn’t as effective as it should be. The Monkeys Ear is a simplistic story of a defective Aladdin’s lamp possessed by morally defective parents. The reason why the child in the antique shop sold the item to Bart despite his father telling him he wasn’t allowed to wasn’t fully explained. A character accidentally saying “I wish for [insert misfortune] whilst forgetting they are holding a wish-fulfilling item is a classic trope that has been used many times. What would have been more frightening is if the item was sold purposefully to the Brendan family. But the seller subtly remarks he will be getting another one. As the Brendan family use the monkeys ear for their wishes they start to get hairier and more animalistic. After they complete the final wish they are turned into monkeys. They are then transported back to the Morocco zoo to live out their lives. The final chapter closes with the seller removing their ears to trick another vulnerable tourist.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nix

    I'm not into horror. Maybe it was a test of willpower or something for me to read this book, but I read it. Maybe I was desperate for reading material. I passed on the other Red Jericho books. Apparently I'd rather be scared than bored. But, er, I wasn't scared. It wasn't that bad. In a sick and slightly twisted way (perhaps the way that people enjoy all horror stories), I liked this book. However, I realize that this book is definitely a children's/young teens' horror book. None of the main cha I'm not into horror. Maybe it was a test of willpower or something for me to read this book, but I read it. Maybe I was desperate for reading material. I passed on the other Red Jericho books. Apparently I'd rather be scared than bored. But, er, I wasn't scared. It wasn't that bad. In a sick and slightly twisted way (perhaps the way that people enjoy all horror stories), I liked this book. However, I realize that this book is definitely a children's/young teens' horror book. None of the main characters dies in fact, and it isn't that graphic. Most of it your imagination fills it all in for you and the book can be rated a safe, er, something between PG and PG-13. I mean, sure, the bloody bathtub was pretty disgusting and creepy, but still, there weren't any victims axed and stored away for years in the bathroom cupboard or in the sink. As fresh as if they'd just come from bathing. In the haunted bathtub . . . well, you see, that would be rated at least a PG-13. I'm telling you, it's hard living in my head. But if you try to keep the imagination to harmless and non-scary things, it doesn't disturb you . . . often. The story about the monkey's ear was pretty awesome. I loved the connection to The Monkey's Paw and found it rather interesting that the story involved a well-intentioned simian body part that misunderstood their wishes instead of a malicious simian body part that brought harm to them. Harriet's dream wasn't particularly enjoyable, because I wasn't exactly sure what was going on. I would have been slightly more comfortable if I had known that he was going to serve her for dinner. Which isn't a very good thing, I suppose, but . . . anyway, this story confused me. Another one that confused me was the man with the yellow face, because I thought the main character was a girl at first. And then the aunt and uncle announced that his name was Simon. And then it turned out that he was the man with the yellow face. It was pretty confusing, but quite a nice little story once you got over it. (Yes. A horror story was a nice little story. This one was, but the bathtub one wasn't.) To say the least, it was a good collection of stories--not too long that it got boring, but not too short either--but not the sort of thing that I would go out of my way to check out. (I didn't, actually. I think my brother saw the name Horowitz on the spine and snagged it.)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mark Soone

    Bath Night- 5 stars- Why does the new/old bath tub that her parents bought fill Isabella with fear? Why does no one else feel the panic and terror that she does? Is it just imagination or a wickedly evil device w/ a past to horrifying to imagine??? You will have to read it to find out! Killer Camera- 3.5 stars- This likely would have been a 4 star read, had I not found the ending extremely unrewarding. A young boy buys his father a camera for a birthday gift. For soe reason the boy has uneasy fe Bath Night- 5 stars- Why does the new/old bath tub that her parents bought fill Isabella with fear? Why does no one else feel the panic and terror that she does? Is it just imagination or a wickedly evil device w/ a past to horrifying to imagine??? You will have to read it to find out! Killer Camera- 3.5 stars- This likely would have been a 4 star read, had I not found the ending extremely unrewarding. A young boy buys his father a camera for a birthday gift. For soe reason the boy has uneasy feelings about it up loading the film...Soon things begin to happen... Light Moves- 3 stars- The story begins with a father making a gift of a deceased colleagues computer to his son. The son has uneasy feelings about this computer which seems to have a mind of its own. Again the ending left me unfulfilled. I have long been a short story lover and this collection is super cool... My Avg rating of 3.7.....but the read is so quick and enjoyable that 4 stars fits this well. Horowitz is fast becoming my favorite teen/young adult author....I would call this Stephen King Lite or perhaps RL Stine +...cool little horror short stories...3 superb stories and 6 solid fillers complete this collection....Well done! The Night Bus- 3 stars- Two brother late coming home (after curfew) on Halloween night hop aboard an eerie bus with no other passengers or driver...suddenly midnight comes and........ Harriet's Horrible Dream- 3 stars- None of the characters are particularly likeable so it is difficult to care what happens....otherwise the plot is nice. A spoiled rich girl has no plans to join her family as leave their lavish life behind. Her father has a diabolical plan in leaving her behind. Scared- 3 stars- A bully from the city makes a family trip to the country, and along the way is on the recieving end of a scare..... A Career in Computer Games- 5 stars- Lets face it the premise of being sucked inside of a video game has been done to death....But this one is worth the tiresome cliche. A lazy and opprotunistic young man is offered the job of a lifetime....Cha-ching The Man With the Yellow Face- 3 stars- A young man visits a photo booth with horrific results. The Monkey's Ear- 5 stars- On a family vacation in Morocco a boy buys a Monkey's ear that is supposed to give 4 wishes....What happens when and if that magical ear is hard of hearing????

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Hamilton

    Bath Night This is the scariest story in the book because it is very realistic. I also believe that it is inappropriate for children (tweens). The crimes of the Victorian Ax Murderer were too sordid and reprehensible for their innocent minds. Without this story, the book would have been the perfect horror book for tweens. Killer Camera This was a really good story and I liked everything about it except that some people dabble in the occult, stripping off their clothes and even killing a cat, in ord Bath Night This is the scariest story in the book because it is very realistic. I also believe that it is inappropriate for children (tweens). The crimes of the Victorian Ax Murderer were too sordid and reprehensible for their innocent minds. Without this story, the book would have been the perfect horror book for tweens. Killer Camera This was a really good story and I liked everything about it except that some people dabble in the occult, stripping off their clothes and even killing a cat, in order to summon some devilish spirit. I would have liked the story to continue a few more pages, as well. Light Moves All's well that ends well. That's all I can say for this weird story that involves a dead journalist's old computer and curious messages from the other side. The Night Bus This was another very well-written story. Overall, it was quite pleasant actually, except for the person who had to experience it. Harriet's Horrible Dream I'm sorry to say that Harriet deserves everything that is happening in her nightmare. You'd think that once she wakes up, she'll repent and become a model daughter. But some people never get it, and sometimes, it's too late. Scared A very awesome story. Again, the main character deserves what he got. I guess that's what happens when you mess with Mother Nature and her rules. A Career in Computer Games This story is about what you get for being a lazy, mean, dumb person who only cares about bullying, lying, stealing, and playing video games. Honestly, there's no way to avoid it. You get what you give. The Man with the Yellow Face This story is actually kinda sad. It'll make you think twice before going into a photo booth. Who knows what secrets your photos hold? The Monkey's Ear A weird but imaginative story about a bizarre artifact found in a Morrocan souk. I didn't particularly enjoy it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Patrice Sartor

    GENRE: Fiction, short stories, horror, thriller. SUMMARY: In a number of different tales, ordinary objects take on creepy characteristics. A Bathtub seems sinister, a camera may be deadly, and dreams might not be dreams. EVALUATION: Even though I used to enjoy Stephen King (far from literature, I know), I am not a fan of horror these days. I added this because it is popular among tweens, especially tween boys, and I wanted another short story entry and another horror entry. This fulfilled both nee GENRE: Fiction, short stories, horror, thriller. SUMMARY: In a number of different tales, ordinary objects take on creepy characteristics. A Bathtub seems sinister, a camera may be deadly, and dreams might not be dreams. EVALUATION: Even though I used to enjoy Stephen King (far from literature, I know), I am not a fan of horror these days. I added this because it is popular among tweens, especially tween boys, and I wanted another short story entry and another horror entry. This fulfilled both needs. The stories are simply weird, psychological thrillers than the gross-out kind of horror, which I believe is a good thing. Whether or not they will scare a tween, I am not sure. It certainly will give them pause, as they might not be able to predict what will happen as well as I could. WHY I WOULD INCLUDE IT: As I mentioned, this is a popular title, and horror is a popular genre among tweens. This is above the Goosebumps series, which tweens have likely outgrown, yet not as scary as some older titles. READER'S ANNOTATION: Horowitz Horror features a number of dark, weirdly scary stories with one goal in mind: to freak you out! ITEMS WITH SIMILAR APPEAL: • Darkness Creeping: Twenty Twisted Tales by Neal Shusterman. • Scary Stories by Barry Moser. • Ask the Bones: Scary Stories from Around the World by various authors. • The Best Ghost Stories Ever (Scholastic Classics) by Christopher Krovatin. • Scary Stories Boxed Set by Alvin Schwartz.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Taylor

    Another time when I don't remember much. . . . but I do recall what I think was the first story about the girl and the bath tub. Haha right? A girl in a haunted bath tub, how scary can that be- No. It was terrifying (I see you laughing!). I mean a guy that used to take girls home and chop them up with a victorian axe in the bath tub that this girl now has, scary right, but no the ending was the worst part. The son and the mom get in a really bad fight and the son is taking a bath to cool off. Th Another time when I don't remember much. . . . but I do recall what I think was the first story about the girl and the bath tub. Haha right? A girl in a haunted bath tub, how scary can that be- No. It was terrifying (I see you laughing!). I mean a guy that used to take girls home and chop them up with a victorian axe in the bath tub that this girl now has, scary right, but no the ending was the worst part. The son and the mom get in a really bad fight and the son is taking a bath to cool off. Then the bath fills with blood and the murderer that used to own the tub's ghost appears in the mirror, but the son doesn't notice... the last words were mortifying... "Lying back with all the steam surrounding him, Jeremy found himself floating away. It was a wonderful feeling . He would start with Susan, then there were a couple of boys in his French class, and the headmaster. He knew what he would do. He had seen it that morning in the junk shop in Hampstead. Victorian, he would have said. Heavy with a smooth wooden handle and a razor-sharp blade. Yes. He would go out and buy it the following morning. It was just what he needed..... a good Victorian axe." EEEEEEEEEEKK!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nan Silvernail

    9 Spooky Tales 1) Bath Night - A deep, old Victorian claw-foot tub, with a secret. 2) Killer Camera - A rather sinister second-hand bargain. 3) Light Moves - An old computer that wasn't plugged in comes to life. 4) The Night Bus - Take a tour around London on it. You'll never be the same. 5) Harriet's Horrible Dream - It has to be a dream, it just has to be. 6) Scared - Out in the country? Stay on the paths. 7) A Career in Computer Games - This is no Beta Test. 8) The Man with the Yellow Face - Twilight 9 Spooky Tales 1) Bath Night - A deep, old Victorian claw-foot tub, with a secret. 2) Killer Camera - A rather sinister second-hand bargain. 3) Light Moves - An old computer that wasn't plugged in comes to life. 4) The Night Bus - Take a tour around London on it. You'll never be the same. 5) Harriet's Horrible Dream - It has to be a dream, it just has to be. 6) Scared - Out in the country? Stay on the paths. 7) A Career in Computer Games - This is no Beta Test. 8) The Man with the Yellow Face - Twilight Zone at a train terminal. 9) The Monkey's Ear - Tucked away in the Souk is a strange little shop... ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Picked this up for a light reading break. These are young adult tales. Or summer campfire chillers. Most are morality tales with messages like Stay in School, Beware of Things That Seem Too Good To Be True, Be Compassionate, Don't Have Too High An Opinion of Yourself and the like. The 9th tale, The Monkey's Ear was my favorite. Very witty! A humorous take on The Monkey's Paw, if you can imagine such a thing. Fun Little Shiverers for Little Shavers is my pronouncement.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mimi

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I followed the warning on the cover, 'Do Not Read This Book In Bed'. Unfortunately, that's why I wasn't scared by most of the stories. As usual though, Horowitz does a great job of catching your attention, whether it's by drowning you in the bath, or turning spoilt, shop lifting boys into scarecrows. Only one story disappointed me, 'Scared'. It was detailed, but the story itself was not very interesting. Because the story was a short one, I read through the whole thing. Three stories really made I followed the warning on the cover, 'Do Not Read This Book In Bed'. Unfortunately, that's why I wasn't scared by most of the stories. As usual though, Horowitz does a great job of catching your attention, whether it's by drowning you in the bath, or turning spoilt, shop lifting boys into scarecrows. Only one story disappointed me, 'Scared'. It was detailed, but the story itself was not very interesting. Because the story was a short one, I read through the whole thing. Three stories really made my heart thump uncontrollably, 'Bath Night', 'Killer Camera', and 'Harriet's Horrible Dream'. It is a good collection of stories, but nothing better. Horowitz is capable of far more.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Waleed Salam

    The hitchhiker is a short story in this book that talks about this family in a storm driving back home from a long drive and the father is nice to everyone they saw this man standing in the rain the father asked the man were you heading the man answered the father said its on our way we will drop you off on our way home. As time passed by the child saw the man take out a knife ready to stab the mother but because the boy saw the knife he kicked the knife out of the mans hand opened the door of t The hitchhiker is a short story in this book that talks about this family in a storm driving back home from a long drive and the father is nice to everyone they saw this man standing in the rain the father asked the man were you heading the man answered the father said its on our way we will drop you off on our way home. As time passed by the child saw the man take out a knife ready to stab the mother but because the boy saw the knife he kicked the knife out of the mans hand opened the door of the car and kicked the killer out of the car. it is a great book because no one was killed .

  28. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Bowers

    This book of short stories, although aimed at readers about twenty years younger than myself, was both entertaining and educational. Anyone interested in writing horror or short stories (or both) would be well advised to read this collection. The prose is swift and lean, the suspense masterful and the humour/horror balance pitched just right. Horowitz takes everyday objects, people and places and gives them a creepy, unexpected twist.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jien

    Even bearing in mind this was written for younger audiences, the stories were not at all 'scary,' 'creepy,' or otherwise 'horrific.' The language was perhaps a bit too childish, the stories did not build strong plots, the climaxes were entirely predictable. The characters were not relatable or particularly believable. Even bearing in mind this was written for younger audiences, the stories were not at all 'scary,' 'creepy,' or otherwise 'horrific.' The language was perhaps a bit too childish, the stories did not build strong plots, the climaxes were entirely predictable. The characters were not relatable or particularly believable.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    It's a collection of nine short stories. The protagonists are mostly young.in some cases the titles are dead give away but they do have that element of dread and twisty ending. I enjoyed reading this one .The last one in this collection was more comic than horror but I think it was a good way to end the collection instead of leaving the reader with dread; something sinister yet comic. Good read. It's a collection of nine short stories. The protagonists are mostly young.in some cases the titles are dead give away but they do have that element of dread and twisty ending. I enjoyed reading this one .The last one in this collection was more comic than horror but I think it was a good way to end the collection instead of leaving the reader with dread; something sinister yet comic. Good read.

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