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Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard Major General US Army V1

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Volume One - Preparation for life - The Civil War Volume Two - The Civil War - Reconstruction - Commanding Departments This is Volume I of II. Originally published 1907.


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Volume One - Preparation for life - The Civil War Volume Two - The Civil War - Reconstruction - Commanding Departments This is Volume I of II. Originally published 1907.

22 review for Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard Major General US Army V1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Eric M

    I have rated this book only two stars for the mediocre quality of the writing, the crying need for an editor especially to trim out large chunks of the less interesting bits of his childhood, the complete absence of maps (to help the reader picture the maneuvers and battles he describes), and especially for Howard’s maddening tendency to mention an endless string of names of fellow officers as if we should know who they were and what parts of the (mostly Union, sometimes Confederate) army they c I have rated this book only two stars for the mediocre quality of the writing, the crying need for an editor especially to trim out large chunks of the less interesting bits of his childhood, the complete absence of maps (to help the reader picture the maneuvers and battles he describes), and especially for Howard’s maddening tendency to mention an endless string of names of fellow officers as if we should know who they were and what parts of the (mostly Union, sometimes Confederate) army they commanded. However, I am still fairly interested in reading the second volume of this autobiography, at least through Howard’s time as head of the Freed Men’s (Freedmen’s?) Bureau, because I am interested in his experiences and perspectives of leading the Bureau, and of the taking of Atlanta and Sherman’s subsequent campaigns, and the founding of Howard University.

  2. 4 out of 5

    John Winterson

    Major General Oliver Otis Howard and his book deserve to be better known. For one thing, he was a very interesting man. He was simultaneously a fairly ruthless soldier, commanding a wing of Sherman’s March Through Georgia, and a sincerely devout Christian, indefatigable in charitable works. His autobiography is therefore part military history, part Spiritual reflection, and it works well as both. He was also one of those characters with the knack of being at the right place at the right time and Major General Oliver Otis Howard and his book deserve to be better known. For one thing, he was a very interesting man. He was simultaneously a fairly ruthless soldier, commanding a wing of Sherman’s March Through Georgia, and a sincerely devout Christian, indefatigable in charitable works. His autobiography is therefore part military history, part Spiritual reflection, and it works well as both. He was also one of those characters with the knack of being at the right place at the right time and meeting interesting people. Typically, he was a friend of his fellow Major General, Lew Wallace, who had the same gift. Above all, he lived one of those extraordinarily full lives that leaves most us feeling rather guilty at our own lack of achievement. In just four years during the American Civil War, he rose from Lieutenant to Major General commanding a full Field Army. He lost his arm in the Battle of Fair Oaks and won the Congressional Medal of Honour. He played a central, if controversial role at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. As Commissioner of Freedmen, he played an even more central and controversial role in the Post-War Reconstruction of the South. Another central role as the man who started and finished the Nez Perce War is just as controversial, but there is no controversy about the courage or the success of his peace mission to Cochise. As Superintendent of West Point, he tried to get the persecuted black cadet Johnson Whittaker a fair trial. In his spare time, he co-founded two universities, one of them, named after him, among the best regarded in America. In many ways this book deserves five stars. The sole disappointment is that he says so little about his role in the Indian Wars. Since this was the subject of a separate book, it is perhaps understandable but it still leaves a hole in this one. A summary would have been useful. One feels he could perhaps have said more about his dealings with Cochise and Chief Joseph, and less about the accounts of the Freedman’s Bureau.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tim Willard

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

  5. 4 out of 5

    Zoe's Human

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lynda

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rem

  9. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Swan

  10. 4 out of 5

    Shiksa

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ken

  12. 4 out of 5

    Aditya Pareek

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Alcantara

  14. 4 out of 5

    John Cross

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jesus Gonzalez

  16. 5 out of 5

    Clarence W. Griggs

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rick Koloian

  19. 4 out of 5

    Laurel Zito

  20. 4 out of 5

    Avis Black

  21. 5 out of 5

    David Hilliard

  22. 5 out of 5

    LAURA SAWYER

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