counter create hit Hipster Business Models: How to make a living in the modern world - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Hipster Business Models: How to make a living in the modern world

Availability: Ready to download

Tight pants, fake reading glasses, beards, irony: this is modern society’s interpretation of the word ‘hipster’. Yet, today’s young people have much more to offer. If half of the hipster stereotype is a consumer who tries to show off how cool he is based on his tastes, the other half of the stereotype is ‘The Maker’ -- the person out hawking homemade cheese, knitting swea Tight pants, fake reading glasses, beards, irony: this is modern society’s interpretation of the word ‘hipster’. Yet, today’s young people have much more to offer. If half of the hipster stereotype is a consumer who tries to show off how cool he is based on his tastes, the other half of the stereotype is ‘The Maker’ -- the person out hawking homemade cheese, knitting sweaters for your beard, or repurposing steel-framed bicycles. The hipster business model is distinctive: Make a product you love so much that you’ll make it yourself. See if anyone wants it. Try again. When they want to build apparel companies, they teach themselves how to sew. When they dream of producing toys, they learn how to use 3D printing software. When they don’t know investors who will back their restaurant concepts, they open food trucks. All the while, they are guided by books, instructional videos, and intuition; only later do they move production to real factories, or hire lawyers. They frequent public parks to see if anyone will buy their custom, typewritten stories. They use crowdfunding websites to raise money from customers before their products even exist. They post their ideas to massive web forums to gauge interest, or set up online shops the second they have a product to sell. In their world, sales come first, not last. While each entrepreneur featured in this book embarked on his or her own unique quest, their stories share a common thread: like true hipsters, they were not afraid to try new things.


Compare
Ads Banner

Tight pants, fake reading glasses, beards, irony: this is modern society’s interpretation of the word ‘hipster’. Yet, today’s young people have much more to offer. If half of the hipster stereotype is a consumer who tries to show off how cool he is based on his tastes, the other half of the stereotype is ‘The Maker’ -- the person out hawking homemade cheese, knitting swea Tight pants, fake reading glasses, beards, irony: this is modern society’s interpretation of the word ‘hipster’. Yet, today’s young people have much more to offer. If half of the hipster stereotype is a consumer who tries to show off how cool he is based on his tastes, the other half of the stereotype is ‘The Maker’ -- the person out hawking homemade cheese, knitting sweaters for your beard, or repurposing steel-framed bicycles. The hipster business model is distinctive: Make a product you love so much that you’ll make it yourself. See if anyone wants it. Try again. When they want to build apparel companies, they teach themselves how to sew. When they dream of producing toys, they learn how to use 3D printing software. When they don’t know investors who will back their restaurant concepts, they open food trucks. All the while, they are guided by books, instructional videos, and intuition; only later do they move production to real factories, or hire lawyers. They frequent public parks to see if anyone will buy their custom, typewritten stories. They use crowdfunding websites to raise money from customers before their products even exist. They post their ideas to massive web forums to gauge interest, or set up online shops the second they have a product to sell. In their world, sales come first, not last. While each entrepreneur featured in this book embarked on his or her own unique quest, their stories share a common thread: like true hipsters, they were not afraid to try new things.

30 review for Hipster Business Models: How to make a living in the modern world

  1. 4 out of 5

    Luke Rajlich

    Most of the stories are about people's hobbies and hardly anyone in the book (

  2. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Gordon

    It would be a serious waste of an hour to finish reading this. A ridiculous round up of drop out business models like food Trucks and selling oddly shaped Cheetos, oh no wait, he didn't actually sell any Cheetos he just posted them to Instagram. Don't bother.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nicolas Leroy

    Looking for inspiration? This book bundles stories from entrepreneurs that each followed their passion and ended up with a micro business, a world imperium or something in between. It was nice reading about them. The main message: follow your passion and find the business model that goes with it. Thanks for the inspiration!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Grin

    Decent book about unusual businesses and the people who created them. Some were interesting, most were just ok.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mike Smith

    Priceonomics gets modern business. They have a nice balance of data driven journalism and they go behind the scenes of all these things we wouldn't think are businesses but are.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Pete

    Hipster Business Models (2014) by Priceonomics is a collection of essays that appeared on the excellent Priceonomics web site. People making money out of music, being a dancing robot, creating tanks for jellyfish, type out stories and create plastic yoga men make for really interesting stories. The book makes an interesting point that people make money in the most curious ways, creating things on kickstarter and indiegogo to delight us all. None of the subjects of the book makes really big money, Hipster Business Models (2014) by Priceonomics is a collection of essays that appeared on the excellent Priceonomics web site. People making money out of music, being a dancing robot, creating tanks for jellyfish, type out stories and create plastic yoga men make for really interesting stories. The book makes an interesting point that people make money in the most curious ways, creating things on kickstarter and indiegogo to delight us all. None of the subjects of the book makes really big money, but they do make a living doing something they love. The conclusion in the book about this is that the kids are alright. It's a very good point. If you haven't subscribed to the rss feed and haven't read the site much this book would be a really good read. If you have read the website it's a fun reminder of things and probably contains a few new revelations as well. It's also worth noting that the Priceonomics teams writes well, or has a great editor so it's a very pleasant read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Claudia Yahany

    Leí un artículo excelente de los Hipsters (no me gusta mucho la etiqueta) que los describía y compartía por qué la pasión por mejores productos los hacia crear sus propias empresas. Algo así está descrito en la introducción. Los demás, son solo ejemplos.. de los que rescato un par, el resto son ilustrativos. Me hubiera gustado un buen análisis como conclusión, que finalmente me he dejado de tarea.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Theigbobandit

    Nice and easy read. If you are thinking of setting up a business to monetise your talents, this books takes you through stories of people who have done same with possibly weirder interests. I guess there are people who make money from their passions afterall :)

  9. 5 out of 5

    David

    This is like "Zero to Maker" and "The Maker Manifesto", but with much better writing and without the annoying "call to action" frame those books had. It also reminds me a bit of a freakonomics book or podcast, but again with better writing and less of the annoying cutsy stuff Dubner does.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Khuram Malik

    Brilliant. Such an easy read and some great examples of how people are striking out on their own and making it work for them. Highly recommended light-reading for anyone who's getting into running their own business. It's not like the other business books.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Ignore the clickbait title, or whatever you call clickbait when it's a book. It's a bunch of stories about people making money doing what they love. Quick read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kristian Kalsing

    22 interesting stories of some creative and different business models that don't fit any standard molds.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Colin Loretz

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amanda England

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jonny

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marcel Brussee

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jon Alves

  18. 4 out of 5

    Yauri

  19. 5 out of 5

    Todd

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eugene

  21. 5 out of 5

    Neil

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ernyst Siahaan

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hamish Durkin

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  25. 4 out of 5

    Robert Medeiros

  26. 5 out of 5

    Monika Kanokova

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alexa Martz

  28. 4 out of 5

    Theo

  29. 4 out of 5

    Vadim Feldman

  30. 4 out of 5

    Maria

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.