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The classic Crazy Salad, by screenwriting legend and novelist Nora Ephron, is an extremely funny, deceptively light look at a generation of women (and men) who helped shape the way we live now. In this distinctive, engaging, and simply hilarious view of a period of great upheaval in America, Ephron turns her keen eye and wonderful sense of humor to the media, politics, bea The classic Crazy Salad, by screenwriting legend and novelist Nora Ephron, is an extremely funny, deceptively light look at a generation of women (and men) who helped shape the way we live now. In this distinctive, engaging, and simply hilarious view of a period of great upheaval in America, Ephron turns her keen eye and wonderful sense of humor to the media, politics, beauty products, and women's bodies. In the famous "A Few Words About Breasts," for example, she tells us: "If I had had them, I would have been a completely different person. I honestly believe that." Ephron brings her sharp pen to bear on the notable women of the time, and to a series of events ranging from Watergate to the Pillsbury Bake-Off. When it first appeared in 1975, Crazy Salad helped to illuminate a new American era—and helped us to laugh at our times and ourselves. This new edition will delight a fresh generation of readers. Contents: A few words about breasts.--Fantasies.--On never having been a prom queen.--The girls in the office.--Reunion.--Miami.--Vaginal politics.--Bernice Gera, first lady umpire.--Deep throat.--On consciousness-raising.--Dealing with the, uh, problem.--The hurled ashtray.--Truth and consequences.--Baking off.--Crazy ladies: I.--The pig.--Dorothy Parker.--A star is born.--Women in Israel: The myth of liberation.--The littlest Nixon.--Divorce, Maryland style.--Rose Mary Woods: the lady or the tiger?--No, but I read the book.--Crazy ladies: II.--Conundrum. Portions of this book have appeared in Esquire magazine, New York magazine, and Rolling Stone.


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The classic Crazy Salad, by screenwriting legend and novelist Nora Ephron, is an extremely funny, deceptively light look at a generation of women (and men) who helped shape the way we live now. In this distinctive, engaging, and simply hilarious view of a period of great upheaval in America, Ephron turns her keen eye and wonderful sense of humor to the media, politics, bea The classic Crazy Salad, by screenwriting legend and novelist Nora Ephron, is an extremely funny, deceptively light look at a generation of women (and men) who helped shape the way we live now. In this distinctive, engaging, and simply hilarious view of a period of great upheaval in America, Ephron turns her keen eye and wonderful sense of humor to the media, politics, beauty products, and women's bodies. In the famous "A Few Words About Breasts," for example, she tells us: "If I had had them, I would have been a completely different person. I honestly believe that." Ephron brings her sharp pen to bear on the notable women of the time, and to a series of events ranging from Watergate to the Pillsbury Bake-Off. When it first appeared in 1975, Crazy Salad helped to illuminate a new American era—and helped us to laugh at our times and ourselves. This new edition will delight a fresh generation of readers. Contents: A few words about breasts.--Fantasies.--On never having been a prom queen.--The girls in the office.--Reunion.--Miami.--Vaginal politics.--Bernice Gera, first lady umpire.--Deep throat.--On consciousness-raising.--Dealing with the, uh, problem.--The hurled ashtray.--Truth and consequences.--Baking off.--Crazy ladies: I.--The pig.--Dorothy Parker.--A star is born.--Women in Israel: The myth of liberation.--The littlest Nixon.--Divorce, Maryland style.--Rose Mary Woods: the lady or the tiger?--No, but I read the book.--Crazy ladies: II.--Conundrum. Portions of this book have appeared in Esquire magazine, New York magazine, and Rolling Stone.

30 review for Crazy Salad: Some Things About Women

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I found this in my mother's bookshelf when I was 12. It was a revelation -- writers could talk this way? About this stuff? They can publish books about breasts, and bake-offs, and vaginal deodorant? I loved everything about it -- the specificity of Nora's voice, intimate and New York and Jewish, the unflinchingly female topics, the implicit insistence that these were stories that mattered.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Arda

    My friend Hannah lent me this book a little over a month after the passing of Nora Ephron. "Skim through it," she said, "you might enjoy some of the essays. You don't have to read all of it." But of course Nora started this book with "A few words about breasts", and as soon as I finished reading that, I knew that I would read the book in its entirety, and quickly. Nora seems to be free of self-consciousness - she says it as it is without worrying too much about who will think what. This quality My friend Hannah lent me this book a little over a month after the passing of Nora Ephron. "Skim through it," she said, "you might enjoy some of the essays. You don't have to read all of it." But of course Nora started this book with "A few words about breasts", and as soon as I finished reading that, I knew that I would read the book in its entirety, and quickly. Nora seems to be free of self-consciousness - she says it as it is without worrying too much about who will think what. This quality is refreshing, and maybe even rare, seeing that she must have been in her early 30s when she wrote these essays in 1970s New York. What fascinated me most about her writing was that every time, no no, every.single.time, she knew exactly how to finish every.single.essay at just the.right.note. Are all these essays relevant to women? Do her conclusions stand the test of time? Did I identify with all the essays or have insight about the people she was talking about? The answer to all of these questions may be "no", but it really does not matter so much. I didn't know half the people she was talking about, I was not even born in those times, but I'm glad she took the time to give us a glimpse of what it must have been like in the early 70s, and to raise questions about women's lib and see how they translate to our personal lives, and to see that perhaps the more things change, the more they remain the same. * From 'A few words about breasts': "She [the boyfriend's mom] was, as it happens, only the first of what seems to me to be a never-ending string of women who have made competitive remarks to me about breast size. "I would love to wear a dress like that," my friend Emily says to me, "but my bust is too big." Like that. Why do women say these things to me? Do I attract these remarks the way other women attract married men or alcoholics or homosexuals?"

  3. 4 out of 5

    Paula Johnson

    If you can get your hands on it, I recommend reading the original hardback/paperback issued in the seventies. You get all the essays in their completeness. Before reading this book, I was only familiar with Nora Ephron from Sleepless in Seattle and You've Got Mail. These essays, unlike the movies, are not schmaltzy in the least. They are sharply observant, acerbic, and very funny. I especially enjoyed her writings on the sixties/seventies women's movement. Although Ephron was a feminist and a supp If you can get your hands on it, I recommend reading the original hardback/paperback issued in the seventies. You get all the essays in their completeness. Before reading this book, I was only familiar with Nora Ephron from Sleepless in Seattle and You've Got Mail. These essays, unlike the movies, are not schmaltzy in the least. They are sharply observant, acerbic, and very funny. I especially enjoyed her writings on the sixties/seventies women's movement. Although Ephron was a feminist and a supporter of the movement, she was also clear-eyed about its many shortcomings (for example, she questions the efficacy of "consciousness raising" rap groups. Too often the "personal is political" devolves into useless navel-gazing.)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kaethe Douglas

    Crazy Salad - Nora Ephron Ephron amuses me, even if I don't always agree with her.   ***   It’s been a long time since I read this, which I’ve wanted to do ever since the recent Ephron buddy binge with Veronica. But I couldn’t find our copy. And then I did! It was a housekeeping miracle. These essays originally appeared in the early seventies for Esquire. So in turn, that ties back into the women’s college tour, and the Steinem emphasis of this spring. I say “our copy”, but it isn’t: it’s the Spouse Crazy Salad - Nora Ephron Ephron amuses me, even if I don't always agree with her.   ***   It’s been a long time since I read this, which I’ve wanted to do ever since the recent Ephron buddy binge with Veronica. But I couldn’t find our copy. And then I did! It was a housekeeping miracle. These essays originally appeared in the early seventies for Esquire. So in turn, that ties back into the women’s college tour, and the Steinem emphasis of this spring. I say “our copy”, but it isn’t: it’s the Spouse’s copy that he brought to the marriage. That makes this one of the reasons why I married him. The books and the feminist cred. Personal copy

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kris Patrick

    Megan Daum recommended Crazy Salad when I saw her speak at Butler as part of their Visiting Writers Series last month. Ephron's influence on Daum's writing is evident. A good thing! Love their ears and eyes for social irony, and their habit of wrapping up essays with a tough question or a jewel of wisdom. Learning about Ephron's work as a feminist activist and thinker give me a new appreciation for Sleepness in Seattle and You've Got Mail. Her passing is such a loss. We could really use her wit Megan Daum recommended Crazy Salad when I saw her speak at Butler as part of their Visiting Writers Series last month. Ephron's influence on Daum's writing is evident. A good thing! Love their ears and eyes for social irony, and their habit of wrapping up essays with a tough question or a jewel of wisdom. Learning about Ephron's work as a feminist activist and thinker give me a new appreciation for Sleepness in Seattle and You've Got Mail. Her passing is such a loss. We could really use her wit and sense of humor to make sense of these interesting times...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Meha Desai

    Hilarious! But I think its only for women. Not necessarily though. Men can read this book too but its too girl-y for me! And I could relate so much with Nora. Funny thing is that...I am always on with such sense of humor & do all these kind of stuffs everyday but somehow read & like Angst/Tragedy genre only! After reading this, I think I should start reading humor now! And there were few parts which did not even affect me in anyway, may be because it was time period issue! I am 90s kid & 2k teena Hilarious! But I think its only for women. Not necessarily though. Men can read this book too but its too girl-y for me! And I could relate so much with Nora. Funny thing is that...I am always on with such sense of humor & do all these kind of stuffs everyday but somehow read & like Angst/Tragedy genre only! After reading this, I think I should start reading humor now! And there were few parts which did not even affect me in anyway, may be because it was time period issue! I am 90s kid & 2k teenager so I might not get few points from an American in 60s to 80s era! Maybe...not sure though! My personal favourite chapter - Divorce, Maryland Style! I really found it funny but somewhere it was mix of emotions such as anger, sadness & hurt and that too ego hurt! #FunnyYetEmotional All in all, a good book!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Heidi Brydon

    The essay in this book called "Miami" is one of the best things I ever read, basically it details how Betty Friedan picked the biggest catfight of all Feminism with Gloria Steinem, basically because she was so much thinner and prettier than she was. I love that Nora Ephron told the truth about that, because it was that kind of behavior within Women's Groups at my own college that initially turned me off on the idea of calling myself a Feminist. I've changed on that, and I say, don't let the bitch The essay in this book called "Miami" is one of the best things I ever read, basically it details how Betty Friedan picked the biggest catfight of all Feminism with Gloria Steinem, basically because she was so much thinner and prettier than she was. I love that Nora Ephron told the truth about that, because it was that kind of behavior within Women's Groups at my own college that initially turned me off on the idea of calling myself a Feminist. I've changed on that, and I say, don't let the bitches keep you from being a Feminist. And I'm not being sexists, because you shouldn't let the bastards stop you from being a Feminist either! I'm so sad Nora Ephron is dead. I'm so sad I didn't know more about her until she died.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lix Hewett

    This was going four-stars great (so many interesting anecdotes! pretty fascinating to see a woman's point of view on the women's lib movement as it was happening) until I got to the very last essay, which is filled to the brim with ignorant, unapologetic transphobia (from the author) and misogyny (from the transperson the article is about), which... well, really put a dampener on my feelings about the book. I'd have taken the rating all the way down to one or two stars save for the fact that thi This was going four-stars great (so many interesting anecdotes! pretty fascinating to see a woman's point of view on the women's lib movement as it was happening) until I got to the very last essay, which is filled to the brim with ignorant, unapologetic transphobia (from the author) and misogyny (from the transperson the article is about), which... well, really put a dampener on my feelings about the book. I'd have taken the rating all the way down to one or two stars save for the fact that this was written in the 70s, which isn't really much of an excuse at all.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    It seems terrible form to give this book a bad review, but here I am doing it. First things first: Nora Ephron was an amazing talent and hilarious voice. But if you're looking for a sampler of that wit that feels lively and relevant to today, I suggest you look elsewhere. "Crazy Salad" is not a collection that, for anyone born in the last 40 years, has aged terribly well. Though a few excellent essays transcend time, many of the rest feel so dated and trapped in their own historical era that you h It seems terrible form to give this book a bad review, but here I am doing it. First things first: Nora Ephron was an amazing talent and hilarious voice. But if you're looking for a sampler of that wit that feels lively and relevant to today, I suggest you look elsewhere. "Crazy Salad" is not a collection that, for anyone born in the last 40 years, has aged terribly well. Though a few excellent essays transcend time, many of the rest feel so dated and trapped in their own historical era that you half expect shag carpet to begin growing underneath your feet as you read it. (Want to read about the interpersonal dynamics between Bella Abzug, Gloria Steinem and Betty Friedan at the 1972 Democratic Convention? Don't worry - there are TWO essays in this collection that address this topic.) There is no question that Ephron was an incisive writer and razor wit and I don't doubt this particular collection read great when it was published in the 70s but I think this book begs some editorial deletions (and combination with other collections) to be interesting to a casual reader today.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tori Miller

    I feel so appreciative for all of the women who came before me that paved the way for women to have all of the options that we have today. I really enjoyed learning more about this period in history where so much change was taking place. Some of the essays seemed really irrelevant and didn't stand the test of time, but many of them were still very interesting to read. I learned aspects of the women's movement that I had never heard anything about before. A lot of the essays just happened to be w I feel so appreciative for all of the women who came before me that paved the way for women to have all of the options that we have today. I really enjoyed learning more about this period in history where so much change was taking place. Some of the essays seemed really irrelevant and didn't stand the test of time, but many of them were still very interesting to read. I learned aspects of the women's movement that I had never heard anything about before. A lot of the essays just happened to be written in the months just before and just after I was born, and it was really cool to read what was going on at that time.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Daisy

    Just curious -- but it's not really my thing. In fact, in the 1983 Introduction to the 1975 Preface both by Ephron herself, she says, "Some of them seem dated--which is inevitable with magazine pieces; some of them that seem dated nonetheless have a kind of quaint historical value." Maybe the latter will come true with time. Steve Martin's Introduction to the Modern Library Humor and Wit Series is very funny however.

  12. 4 out of 5

    NatFran

    I always enjoy the writing of Nora Ephron. After reading these articles, that notion was further confirmed as was the idea that I'm glad that I didn't have to live through the early 1970's. Though I think women's rights still have a long way to go in order to achieve true equality, it is clearly apparent that we have come such a long way already. This was an eye opening book for some who did not experience those days first hand.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    I just finished “Nixonland” and needed a softer view of the early 1970s, though I don’t think that’s what I got. I believe that Ephron places herself in the tradition of Dorothy Parker, and I am so far convinced that this is deserved. However, where Parker’s era compelled her to write in a prose that is artful but removed, Ephron is able to write directly of her experiences. Perhaps this annoys her detractors, who wish that she were more like Parker. She does get in some good zingers, though. In I just finished “Nixonland” and needed a softer view of the early 1970s, though I don’t think that’s what I got. I believe that Ephron places herself in the tradition of Dorothy Parker, and I am so far convinced that this is deserved. However, where Parker’s era compelled her to write in a prose that is artful but removed, Ephron is able to write directly of her experiences. Perhaps this annoys her detractors, who wish that she were more like Parker. She does get in some good zingers, though. In reviewing a non-fiction exposé, “The Girls in the Office” she states that perhaps the only way to faithfully portray the lives of young working women in New York is as a B-novel, slightly sensational and vaguely condescending. She writes extensively about her ambivalence about certain aspects of the feminist movement. She states that Moses kept the Hebrews wandering for 40 years knowing that no one raised in slavery would be able to found a nation, and she relates this to the women of her generation. Her self-loathing about Wellesley 10-year reunion is quite moving as she concludes that searching and independent thought was bred out of her classmates at this most prestigious school. She provides terrific coverage of the 1972 Democratic National Convention in Miami, and observes the attempts of Betty Friedan to remain relevant and Gloria Steinem’s quest to be taken seriously as a leader. Ephron sees “Deep Throat” one night because it was the only film that no one in her party had seen, and she feeling upset by certain acts and implications in the film, but even more disturbed that all of the men in her group told her not to take it so seriously, that it was only a movie. She describes a consciousness raising group in which women were to look into a vagina, the better to know this part of the body which, Ephron notes in several essays, has been demonized throughout history. She writes of her belief in the idea of consciousness raising groups, and that she has heard about groups elsewhere accomplished their stated goals, but because of the self-disclosure encouraged by such groups, her own group descended into a soap opera of its members talking about their problems with their men. The book ends circa 1973, and is preoccupied with the women surrounding Nixon’s fall due to Watergate: dutiful daughter Julie Nixon Eisenhouer, loyal secretary Rose Mary Woods, and Martha Mitchell, the unstable but truth-telling wife of Nixon’s 1972 campaign director. These profiles examine the supportive (or not) roles of women near powerful men, and how they may feel compelled (or not) to present themselves unflatteringly to protect said men. I also enjoyed a review of the autobiography of Barbara Howar, a 1960s D.C. socialite who may have lived before her time, as her rebellious nature lacked direction or intent. I have read reviews of "Crazy Salad" that claim many of these topics are no longer relevant, or that they are primarily useful as a window into the early 1970s. I do concede that they are a great view into that era, but if you think that any of the issues discussed here have been resolved, you have not been paying attention.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Li Sian

    Nora Ephron's contemporaneous review of the second-wave feminist movement is interesting in some ways and dated in others. Punctuated by occasional flashes of brilliance that appear much more consistently in her later work, I found this a compelling read mainly insofar as it provides a milestone in Ephron's writing career, and Nora Ephron is a writer I have come to care increasingly about since I read her other works ('I Hate My Neck' and 'Heartburn' especially). First, the datedness: I will conf Nora Ephron's contemporaneous review of the second-wave feminist movement is interesting in some ways and dated in others. Punctuated by occasional flashes of brilliance that appear much more consistently in her later work, I found this a compelling read mainly insofar as it provides a milestone in Ephron's writing career, and Nora Ephron is a writer I have come to care increasingly about since I read her other works ('I Hate My Neck' and 'Heartburn' especially). First, the datedness: I will confess to not care very much about feuds in the second-wave feminist movement. I have maybe a faint idea of who Betty Friedan was, and who the other one was, so why they fought and who was to blame is just not that interesting to me, though I have no doubt it was compelling at the time. The same goes to her (at the time) controversial evisceration of her alma mater Wellesley, which she described as having "turned out a generation of docile and unadventurous women". I'm sure the subject must have been very fascinating to some people deeper into the millieu. But: I didn't care. More seriously, there is an entire essay that is transphobic and gross so... this is a very strong reason to not read the collection. I'm putting this under 'datedness', because do I think second-wave feminism was deeply troubling for a whole host of reasons, including the trans-exclusionary ideology that was very common amongst its proponents? Yes. Do I think transphobia and claims about 'real womanhood' (adjacent to, eyeroll, 'universal womanhood') exist in contemporary social discourse and are people hurt by it now? Definitely!!! Either way, it's a cruel, cutting little essay and in this instance Ephron is certainly punching down rather than up for her beloved copy. The strengths: I thought that Ephron is at her joyous best when she digs into human follity. You saw it a little in her essays about Friedan and whoever else (I can't decide if it's my bad memory, or the forgettableness of the whole thing, that makes me not be able to remember), but again those did tend to lapse into 'and then X said' and 'Y did that'. Capitalising on those strengths, I liked: the essays about consciousness-raising, being a journalist versus a feminist, the piece about The Palm Beach Social, and Upstairs, Downstairs. And of course, because I've always said Ephron is at her best when she lets the pain wink through, the piece about her mother's mink.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marissa Morrison

    I enjoyed this lively (though at times quite serious) collection of Ephron's columns from the 1970s. Ephron begins with several uninhibited pieces. In "A Few Words About Breasts," she reveals that insecurity about the size of her breasts is her self-defining characteristic. In "On Never Having Been a Prom Queen," she revisits the theme: "Once I had a date with someone who thought I was beautiful. He talked all night, while I--who spent years developing my conversational ability to compensate for I enjoyed this lively (though at times quite serious) collection of Ephron's columns from the 1970s. Ephron begins with several uninhibited pieces. In "A Few Words About Breasts," she reveals that insecurity about the size of her breasts is her self-defining characteristic. In "On Never Having Been a Prom Queen," she revisits the theme: "Once I had a date with someone who thought I was beautiful. He talked all night, while I--who spent years developing my conversational ability to compensate for my looks (my life has been spent in compensation)--said nothing. At the end of the evening, he made a pass at me, and I was insulted." Mostly this book focuses on the Women's Movement. Ephron identifies herself as a feminist and writes from inside the storm of early Women's Lib. At her Wellesley reunion, Ephron feels embarrassment on behalf of her fellow alums who are staying home to raise children ("housewives," in the parlance of 1972). She sympathizes with Gloria Steinem, found crying and feeling betrayed by George McGovern at the 1972 Democratic Convention. Eprhon issues a lengthy, detailed, and altogether wonderful condemnation of female deodorant spray. And, with open jaw, she observes women competing in the annual Pillsbury Bake-Off. Yet Ephron is unable to support all feminist efforts: she wonders what to say when reviewing a pro-woman book that isn't actually very good in one essay, and in another she recounts how joining a consciousness-raising group ruined her marriage. The later essays collected here, from the mid-to-late 70s, are more frivolous and less gripping than her earlier efforts. I mostly skipped the pieces where she summarizes the plot of "Upstairs, Downstairs" and the content of Gourmet magazine, adding her own opinions here and there. One thing that disturbed me about this book is Ephron's habit of criticizing real people by name. In one instance, she identifies her high-school boyfriend, Buster Klepper, as a pimpled, not "terribly bright" boy. I wonder what hapless Klepper and his mother (who also makes an appearance) did to deserve Eprhon's derision. Similarly, Eprhon ridicules Christine Turpin, newsletter editor for Eprhon's co-op building, for her journalistic efforts.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rose

    This is marketed as a humor book, and it's not (although that's not to say that Ephron doesn't write with a sharp, wry sense of humor, because she does). What it is, is a book of essays, articles, and columns, from the 1970s, on feminism, women, culture, and personal experiences. The writing style is deeply engaging (I had a lot of trouble putting this book down), and I was deeply impressed with Ephron's sharp, unfailing honesty -- particularly as the topic she spends the most time being honest a This is marketed as a humor book, and it's not (although that's not to say that Ephron doesn't write with a sharp, wry sense of humor, because she does). What it is, is a book of essays, articles, and columns, from the 1970s, on feminism, women, culture, and personal experiences. The writing style is deeply engaging (I had a lot of trouble putting this book down), and I was deeply impressed with Ephron's sharp, unfailing honesty -- particularly as the topic she spends the most time being honest about is herself. But this book was also an eye-opener for me. I've always been aware of the fact that feminism has not been a long-running movement (which is why I find comments about "not needing feminism" anymore to be so silly, because: are you kidding me? You really think all the prejudices have been eradicated?? Please). But I had no idea things were quite ... quite the way they were for women as recently as the 70s. The 70s were yesterday, and getting a window into what it was like for women in the 70s was more than an eye-opener: it was something of a complete shift in my perspective. I consider myself a feminist in that I simply think men and women should be equal. (Craziness, right?) If you think the same -- and you find very-recent history to be as interesting as I do (I've been interested in the 50s-70s for years) -- give this one a try. It's funny, it's depressing, it's thought-provoking, it's infuriating ... and it's got a few moments of surprising poignancy. Great stuff.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bridget Bonasoro

    The events may not be current and the times may seem radically different from today, but Nora Ephron has the ability to relate to you even after 40-plus years of separation. In Crazy Salad, a collection of essays written by Ephron in the 70's, she takes the time to find the hilarious nooks and unseemly crannies in every topic she tackles. The first essay, which starts the book, is titled "A Few Words About Breasts," and elucidates her feelings on womanhood and feminism as well as her own insecur The events may not be current and the times may seem radically different from today, but Nora Ephron has the ability to relate to you even after 40-plus years of separation. In Crazy Salad, a collection of essays written by Ephron in the 70's, she takes the time to find the hilarious nooks and unseemly crannies in every topic she tackles. The first essay, which starts the book, is titled "A Few Words About Breasts," and elucidates her feelings on womanhood and feminism as well as her own insecurities. The following essays highlight this ability to relate her own experience to the overarching politics of the seventies with the wit and conversational voice one would expect from a legendary writer. In addition to all of this, Ephron's essays function as a window into the feminist movement of the time. Through her eyes, we are able to understand how yesterday's struggles inform today's progress. It's history one would enjoy reading.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Nora Ephron recently passed away. I enjoyed her writing and movies so much that as a tribute I’d read her other books. This one shed a lot of light on the times 1972 thru 1974. She was a strong voice for women’s liberation and wrote and represented the cause. These essays appeared in Esquire, New York, The Rolling Stone, and The New Yorker. I was very much impressed with her thoughts and insight. The look back fascinated me (as usual). I was in high school and didn’t really realize how women were Nora Ephron recently passed away. I enjoyed her writing and movies so much that as a tribute I’d read her other books. This one shed a lot of light on the times 1972 thru 1974. She was a strong voice for women’s liberation and wrote and represented the cause. These essays appeared in Esquire, New York, The Rolling Stone, and The New Yorker. I was very much impressed with her thoughts and insight. The look back fascinated me (as usual). I was in high school and didn’t really realize how women were kept “oppressed” to put it mildly. Books she mentioned I need to read- The Best of Everything-Rona Jaffe To Nora “it caught perfectly the awful essence of being single in a big city” Laughing All The Way-Barbara Howar A socialite who did ridiculous things An Unfinished Woman-Lillian Hellman (memoir) also a bit of Dorothy Parker

  19. 5 out of 5

    Becki Iverson

    Crazy Salad is another gem in the Ephron pantheon. It has a slightly more serious slant than the other books I've read of hers, but she pulls it off all the same. I'd love to see this used in women's studies courses or courses on the 1960s/70s - it manages to be factual, insightful, and entertaining all at the same time, and I think it would be a great tool for introducing second wave feminism to teens and college students. Ephron has such a unique voice, and it's such a pleasure now to visit he Crazy Salad is another gem in the Ephron pantheon. It has a slightly more serious slant than the other books I've read of hers, but she pulls it off all the same. I'd love to see this used in women's studies courses or courses on the 1960s/70s - it manages to be factual, insightful, and entertaining all at the same time, and I think it would be a great tool for introducing second wave feminism to teens and college students. Ephron has such a unique voice, and it's such a pleasure now to visit her work and see how it has all woven together into a witty, poignant, unabashedly pro-ladies tapestry over 40 years in the making that is hella fun to roll around in. She's definitely missed, and I don't know if we'll ever really find a voice like hers again.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Harriett Milnes

    These are a collection of articles written for Esquire magazine in 1972 - 74. She is a good writer; she sees themes in current event stories. But what I like most was the flash, no the jolt, of recognition of names I had once thought would never be forgotten and that I had not thought of in 40 years: Phillippe Halsman, the photographer of the jumping subjects, Alix Kates Shulman, Ti-Grace Atkinson, Gloria Steinem, Bella Apzug, Betty Friedan, Shirley Chisholm -- ok, maybe I have thought of some o These are a collection of articles written for Esquire magazine in 1972 - 74. She is a good writer; she sees themes in current event stories. But what I like most was the flash, no the jolt, of recognition of names I had once thought would never be forgotten and that I had not thought of in 40 years: Phillippe Halsman, the photographer of the jumping subjects, Alix Kates Shulman, Ti-Grace Atkinson, Gloria Steinem, Bella Apzug, Betty Friedan, Shirley Chisholm -- ok, maybe I have thought of some of them in 40 years. The Loud family, Jan Morris, the articles go on and on, a true picture of the early 70s. She also writes about consciouness-raising groups, and looking at one's own uterus with a plastic speculum. FDS. Bobby Riggs. Great book for women of a certain age.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aja

    So at first thought, all I could think was "holy white feminism". So many of these essays are missing key points in intersectionality. People of color are inherently missing from the dialogue and the essay about a particular trans woman left me reeling ... but as the book progresses, there is more of us, we are visible. I do think however that so many of these essays are important to the landscape of America's history. The one about Rose Mary Woods is way more truthful than a lot of the country So at first thought, all I could think was "holy white feminism". So many of these essays are missing key points in intersectionality. People of color are inherently missing from the dialogue and the essay about a particular trans woman left me reeling ... but as the book progresses, there is more of us, we are visible. I do think however that so many of these essays are important to the landscape of America's history. The one about Rose Mary Woods is way more truthful than a lot of the country would feel comfortable admitting. This world really has it out for women. We are chewed up and spit out and blamed for the fall of empires. Definitely a must read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    Nora Ephron presensts a set of essays here dealing mostly with women's issues. They're sharp and funny, although some are a bit dated because they were written in the early 70's. However, they hold up well to a second reading and, sadly enough, some are still all too accurate for today. My favorite is the essay on women's personal hygiene sprays, which details the creation of a completely unnecessary product and then the creation of a very large market for said product. The methods are obviously Nora Ephron presensts a set of essays here dealing mostly with women's issues. They're sharp and funny, although some are a bit dated because they were written in the early 70's. However, they hold up well to a second reading and, sadly enough, some are still all too accurate for today. My favorite is the essay on women's personal hygiene sprays, which details the creation of a completely unnecessary product and then the creation of a very large market for said product. The methods are obviously all too sickeningly current even as I write. Worth reading--again.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Northrup

    I was inspired to read this by Ariel Levy's recent New Yorker profile on Ephron. This has much more substance than her movies, or even her most recent book. Most of these essays were written just after I was born, so it's a useful historical perspective. A lot actually has improved. My copy is full of little post-it flags for things I will have to look up, or ask my mother about. On the other hand, probably none of the book's original readers knew why a Pillsbury Bake-Off contestant's speedy Haw I was inspired to read this by Ariel Levy's recent New Yorker profile on Ephron. This has much more substance than her movies, or even her most recent book. Most of these essays were written just after I was born, so it's a useful historical perspective. A lot actually has improved. My copy is full of little post-it flags for things I will have to look up, or ask my mother about. On the other hand, probably none of the book's original readers knew why a Pillsbury Bake-Off contestant's speedy Hawaiian bread was called Wiki Coffee Cake....

  24. 4 out of 5

    Diane Shipley

    I don't agree with everything Nora wrote here, but it's all so insightful and intelligent that I was entertained and impressed by all of it (although I love her first person stories the most). What really stands out is how prescient she was: she made observations 40 years ago that still ring true today, and had essays on pop culture that could easily be read as critiques of 50 Shades and the Kardashians. An excellent book. (I just wish it wasn't a bastardised later version with some of the origi I don't agree with everything Nora wrote here, but it's all so insightful and intelligent that I was entertained and impressed by all of it (although I love her first person stories the most). What really stands out is how prescient she was: she made observations 40 years ago that still ring true today, and had essays on pop culture that could easily be read as critiques of 50 Shades and the Kardashians. An excellent book. (I just wish it wasn't a bastardised later version with some of the originals removed. I would have liked to have read those, too.)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marisa

    Teton County Library Call No: 301.42 EPHRON Marisa's rating: 4 stars With Nora Ephron's recent passing, I thought I would check out her work. I knew she was a feminist and had written some famous screen plays. This book was a pleasure to read. It is a collection of Ephron's essay and long-form articles from the 1970s on tropics from the "Pillsbury Bake-Off" to the messy Maryland Governor's divorce to the movie "Deep Throat". I appreciate her humor but also her well thought out analysis. While writ Teton County Library Call No: 301.42 EPHRON Marisa's rating: 4 stars With Nora Ephron's recent passing, I thought I would check out her work. I knew she was a feminist and had written some famous screen plays. This book was a pleasure to read. It is a collection of Ephron's essay and long-form articles from the 1970s on tropics from the "Pillsbury Bake-Off" to the messy Maryland Governor's divorce to the movie "Deep Throat". I appreciate her humor but also her well thought out analysis. While written in the 1970s I thought much of her work applicable and interesting for readers of today.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I became a fan of Nora Ephron's work over the years and am a huge fan of her screenplays, "When Harry Met Sally," "Sleepless in Seattle," and "You've Got Mail." This is a collection of essays that Ephron wrote while a writer for Esquire and New York magazine in the 1970s. Humorous and engaging, Ephron provides a glimpse into history as she chronicles several events in the 1970s from a feminist perspective.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    This is an entertaining collections of essays about "womens' lib" and pop culture that Ephron (best known nowadays as screenwriter of "Silkwood," "Heartburn,"When Harry Met Sally" and many others) wrote as a columnist in the early 1970s for Esquire magazine. The subjects are a little dated, the subject matter not at all. The more I read of Ephron, the more I like her. Her humility and grace match her wit and insight point for point.

  28. 4 out of 5

    nicole

    Continuing my tour de Ephron, specifically to read "The Girls in the Office" after reading three direct references. I felt as if this were a window into a particular moment in the women's movement, and history, and Ephron's life, one I enjoyed peeking through even if I didn't understand some of the references. I fell asleep a lot while reading this one, at odd times, face-deep into it, proclaiming it would only take me one day to finish. It took four.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Nora Ephron's collection of her Esquire essays from the early 1970's is wonderful to read. Some names and references may be unrecognizable to those under 45 years old, but they certainly offer a slice of life from this unsettling period. Watergate, An American Family (the birth of reality tv?), FDS, Deep Throat, Consciousness Raising...these topics are all examined through Nora's feminist lens. We've lost a truly insightful cultural commentator.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Jane

    It's a long time to read a book, I know, but I put it down and got sidetracked with work and life. I love Nora Ephron and this collection of essays and articles is no exception. It's strung together loosely with her involvement in the Women's Movement of the early 1970s. It's sharp and insightful. History and whimsy and sometimes sad. I made many notes in my phone of places that I need to research more.

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