counter create hit King Alfred's Jewel: Poetry of the Imagination and Imaginative Photography - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

King Alfred's Jewel: Poetry of the Imagination and Imaginative Photography

Availability: Ready to download

David Hamilton brings together two poems and a dramatic monologue in King Alfred’s Jewel: Poetry of the Imagination and Imaginative Photography. This contemporary, original poetry is inspired by the stories behind outlaw legends, and also takes the reader on a number of spiritual journies. Hamilton’s first poem, The Journey, remains almost as it was first written. In stri David Hamilton brings together two poems and a dramatic monologue in King Alfred’s Jewel: Poetry of the Imagination and Imaginative Photography. This contemporary, original poetry is inspired by the stories behind outlaw legends, and also takes the reader on a number of spiritual journies. Hamilton’s first poem, The Journey, remains almost as it was first written. In striving to keep his writing spontaneous, he chose not to over-develop the form of his writing. King Alfred’s Jewel is the title poem and draws its inspiration from The Dark Night of the Soul by Roman Catholic mystic Saint John of the Cross. Using a journey to find the king’s jewel as a guiding theme, the poem is a metaphor for the depression many people feel today and mistakenly try to substitute with unhealthy pasttimes. The dramatic monologue, Wolfshead, which comes at the end of the book, is an imaginative tale of outlaw legends. A 'wolfshead' was a resort of outlaws who formed a community, and this particular story is set in Sherwood Forest with Robin Hood presiding. Using two chorus figures to link proceedings and set the scene, this wolfshead is a ghostly gathering who return to tell their legendary stories… This unique book will make an excellent addition to the collection of any poetry and photography fans. It is also a fascinating read for anyone studying literature or theatre.


Compare
Ads Banner

David Hamilton brings together two poems and a dramatic monologue in King Alfred’s Jewel: Poetry of the Imagination and Imaginative Photography. This contemporary, original poetry is inspired by the stories behind outlaw legends, and also takes the reader on a number of spiritual journies. Hamilton’s first poem, The Journey, remains almost as it was first written. In stri David Hamilton brings together two poems and a dramatic monologue in King Alfred’s Jewel: Poetry of the Imagination and Imaginative Photography. This contemporary, original poetry is inspired by the stories behind outlaw legends, and also takes the reader on a number of spiritual journies. Hamilton’s first poem, The Journey, remains almost as it was first written. In striving to keep his writing spontaneous, he chose not to over-develop the form of his writing. King Alfred’s Jewel is the title poem and draws its inspiration from The Dark Night of the Soul by Roman Catholic mystic Saint John of the Cross. Using a journey to find the king’s jewel as a guiding theme, the poem is a metaphor for the depression many people feel today and mistakenly try to substitute with unhealthy pasttimes. The dramatic monologue, Wolfshead, which comes at the end of the book, is an imaginative tale of outlaw legends. A 'wolfshead' was a resort of outlaws who formed a community, and this particular story is set in Sherwood Forest with Robin Hood presiding. Using two chorus figures to link proceedings and set the scene, this wolfshead is a ghostly gathering who return to tell their legendary stories… This unique book will make an excellent addition to the collection of any poetry and photography fans. It is also a fascinating read for anyone studying literature or theatre.

30 review for King Alfred's Jewel: Poetry of the Imagination and Imaginative Photography

  1. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    The poetry genre as a whole holds many avenues for display and understanding, a very long history of controversy, and much debate over its wellsprings of inspiration in psychology, literary influence, and social evolution. All this is covered in depth in an introduction which basically takes the genre's history and synthesizes its influences in a literary examination of poetry's evolution and philosophical influences. It's unusual to see this kind of introduction in a collection anticipated to be The poetry genre as a whole holds many avenues for display and understanding, a very long history of controversy, and much debate over its wellsprings of inspiration in psychology, literary influence, and social evolution. All this is covered in depth in an introduction which basically takes the genre's history and synthesizes its influences in a literary examination of poetry's evolution and philosophical influences. It's unusual to see this kind of introduction in a collection anticipated to be free verse explorations of self; but then, this kind of opening should offer the idea that King Alfred's Jewel: Poetry of the Imagination and Imaginative Photography will be anything but your usual gathering of personal insights, offering something both extraordinary and a cut above the ordinary - and in this, it does not disappoint. King Alfred's Jewel is actually two long epic poems that sweep through themes of a journey undertaken and a jewel unearthed because of it. The book consists of two narrative poems and a dramatic monologue. The poems deal with depression and the Dark Night of the Soul, while the dramatic monologue presents deceased outlaws coming back to tell their stories on a May evening in Sherwood Forest. The title poem uses the imagery of journey and jewel as its shining light as it probes essences of spirituality and psychology, examining the sources of modern angst and depression and considering the stormy road to spiritual and emotional redemption. There are dragons and inheritances, outlaw legends and metaphors that connect past to present, and streams of consciousness impressions. In choosing these particular formats and weaving a cloak of inspection, history and psychological depth, King Alfred's Jewel is actually much more accessible - despite its lengthy presentations - than one would expect, making it a recommendation for readers who might normally consider the poetic form too constrained, too regulated, and too inaccessible. King Alfred's Jewel is a delight on many levels. Add black and white photos throughout and a selection of color photos by the author, which act as both illustration and interlude to the written word, and you have a collection that stands out in the genre: something firmly rooted in literary, historical, spiritual and psychological traditions, but most definitely more than the sum of its parts.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Moore

    **I was given a copy of this book by the publisher for an honest review.** From the moment I started reading, this book reminded me of college, in general, and writing papers for my various literature courses in general. That being said, I mostly still loved it. The poems, though stylistically similar to those of the distant past, are written in modern language. They are sophisticated and speak to the soul and the senses. There's a scholarly introduction and an appendix at the end wherein the aut **I was given a copy of this book by the publisher for an honest review.** From the moment I started reading, this book reminded me of college, in general, and writing papers for my various literature courses in general. That being said, I mostly still loved it. The poems, though stylistically similar to those of the distant past, are written in modern language. They are sophisticated and speak to the soul and the senses. There's a scholarly introduction and an appendix at the end wherein the author wraps his process. For poetry lovers, this will delight.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Scarlett

    I received a complimentary copy of this novel for an honest review from the publisher. If you like poetry, this is for you. If you like photography, this is for you. I found the poetry simply lovely, with flowing, smooth verses. I could easily picture in my mind a scene, playing out quite like a movie. All in all, I enjoyed it, it's a short read, but not short on content, if that makes sense. Well done. Easily a four star read for me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Abdul Barndt

  5. 5 out of 5

    Erna Mooers

  6. 4 out of 5

    Vince Keetch

  7. 5 out of 5

    Guy Myra

  8. 4 out of 5

    Clementine Lundrigan

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sang Kranwinkle

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cecil Pennick

  11. 4 out of 5

    Karrie Mazzera

  12. 5 out of 5

    Randy Galarza

  13. 5 out of 5

    Annamae Swirczek

  14. 5 out of 5

    D.howellsmail.com

  15. 4 out of 5

    Reynaldo Bongiardina

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lorene Didio

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cyndy Sutphen

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gwenda Dirr

  19. 5 out of 5

    Latrisha Schow

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jc Mory

  21. 4 out of 5

    Felicitas Rowser

  22. 5 out of 5

    Erika Mayze

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jamaal Bischel

  24. 4 out of 5

    Trudi Temby

  25. 4 out of 5

    Marianne Blocklinger

  26. 5 out of 5

    Greg Lounder

  27. 4 out of 5

    Pamila Dryman

  28. 4 out of 5

    Denisha Kritz

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ginette Ploss

  30. 5 out of 5

    Marget Goldberg

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.