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William Shakespeare's Tragedy of the Sith's Revenge (William Shakespeare's Star Wars, #3)

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To thine own Sith be true. Lend us your ears and comlinks for a Shakespearean retelling of Star Wars Episode III! A once-heroic knight becomes the darkest of villains. The Jedi suffer slings and arrows of outrageous fortune. The Republic falls, an Empire rises, and so begins the long wait for a New Hope.    Something is rotten in the state of Coruscant! Don’t miss this final To thine own Sith be true. Lend us your ears and comlinks for a Shakespearean retelling of Star Wars Episode III! A once-heroic knight becomes the darkest of villains. The Jedi suffer slings and arrows of outrageous fortune. The Republic falls, an Empire rises, and so begins the long wait for a New Hope.    Something is rotten in the state of Coruscant! Don’t miss this final chapter in the Star Wars prequel trilogy, presented Shakespeare-style with masterful meter, stirring soliloquies, and intricate Elizabethan illustrations. It’s a perfect melding of classic literature and epic pop culture.


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To thine own Sith be true. Lend us your ears and comlinks for a Shakespearean retelling of Star Wars Episode III! A once-heroic knight becomes the darkest of villains. The Jedi suffer slings and arrows of outrageous fortune. The Republic falls, an Empire rises, and so begins the long wait for a New Hope.    Something is rotten in the state of Coruscant! Don’t miss this final To thine own Sith be true. Lend us your ears and comlinks for a Shakespearean retelling of Star Wars Episode III! A once-heroic knight becomes the darkest of villains. The Jedi suffer slings and arrows of outrageous fortune. The Republic falls, an Empire rises, and so begins the long wait for a New Hope.    Something is rotten in the state of Coruscant! Don’t miss this final chapter in the Star Wars prequel trilogy, presented Shakespeare-style with masterful meter, stirring soliloquies, and intricate Elizabethan illustrations. It’s a perfect melding of classic literature and epic pop culture.

30 review for William Shakespeare's Tragedy of the Sith's Revenge (William Shakespeare's Star Wars, #3)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    I have a ton of fun reading these Shakespeare inspired, George Lucas retellings of the original Star Wars trilogy and now the prequel trilogy. I do plan on reading the final trilogy. I didn't notice any cute cultural lines put in this book. It was pretty much straight up the story and Ian didn't decide to make the end when Vader steps down after surgery like Frankenstein, well he didn't allude to that. This tragedy works amazingly well in Shakespeare verse. It was like something Shakespeare could I have a ton of fun reading these Shakespeare inspired, George Lucas retellings of the original Star Wars trilogy and now the prequel trilogy. I do plan on reading the final trilogy. I didn't notice any cute cultural lines put in this book. It was pretty much straight up the story and Ian didn't decide to make the end when Vader steps down after surgery like Frankenstein, well he didn't allude to that. This tragedy works amazingly well in Shakespeare verse. It was like something Shakespeare could have written if he knew about fantasy and space. This entry in the Star Wars cannon is truly a tragedy with no happy ending. The world seems hopeless and the world is bleak for a whole 18 years or so waiting for Luke and Leia to grow up. I'm so glad that Lucasfilms allows Ian to produce these stories. I enjoy them and look forward to reading the last 3.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Blamp Head

    24 hours ago... O, pray, but listen to mine small story, A book hath now arrived, kindl'ng my will To race, abandon my post, my duty And gaze upon words most tragic and sad. Woe doth visit upon those who cannot... To read e'en now the tragedy most sad The Tragedy of the Revenge of Sith But, fear ye not, dear Youngling, thy time comes! Thou canst, verily, read this book and prize! I do but shudder, soon poor Padme dies! Now... O, woe, most terrible, such deep anguish! Mine book, thou art but fleeting, though 24 hours ago... O, pray, but listen to mine small story, A book hath now arrived, kindl'ng my will To race, abandon my post, my duty And gaze upon words most tragic and sad. Woe doth visit upon those who cannot... To read e'en now the tragedy most sad The Tragedy of the Revenge of Sith But, fear ye not, dear Youngling, thy time comes! Thou canst, verily, read this book and prize! I do but shudder, soon poor Padme dies! Now... O, woe, most terrible, such deep anguish! Mine book, thou art but fleeting, though friend strong A brief, but mighty company to me So wherefore must thou depart hence so brisk? Be still, mine heart, for Force awakens swift Mayhap Sir Doescher -- curtains shallt 'gain lift?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Stormblessed

    NO ONE SHOULD BE SURPRISED THAT THIS IS MY FAVORITE!! My favorite Star Wars movie in Shakespeare form...what a miraculous experience this has been for me. Enjoy this massive plethora of fav quotes (no, I have no shame that I’m basically quoting the entire play): >CHORUS: In times so long ago begins our play, I’m vengeful galaxy far, far away. >ANAKIN: The time of mirth and sport begins anon, For I do love a battle fought in space. (This is where the fun begins haha) >OBI-WAN: With due respect, O, Chanc NO ONE SHOULD BE SURPRISED THAT THIS IS MY FAVORITE!! My favorite Star Wars movie in Shakespeare form...what a miraculous experience this has been for me. Enjoy this massive plethora of fav quotes (no, I have no shame that I’m basically quoting the entire play): >CHORUS: In times so long ago begins our play, I’m vengeful galaxy far, far away. >ANAKIN: The time of mirth and sport begins anon, For I do love a battle fought in space. (This is where the fun begins haha) >OBI-WAN: With due respect, O, Chancellor, Sith Lords The keenest object of our study are. We two are specialists in their domain, And shall our education put to use As we do vanquish this one by the book. >ANAKIN: His date and ours shall be entwin’d as one. Come, Master, these two arms shall bear you hence, As you, these many years, did bear with me. (How wholesome<3) >GREVIOUS: And with him, Anakin Skywalker too— Though I assum’d your reputation vast Belong’d to someone older than yourself. ‘Tis twice the Jedi I did hope to snare Within my nets today: a double catch. ANAKIN: You, Gen’ral Grevious, are far smaller than I did expect, from what few tales I’ve heard. They did give tell of one most like a titan, Yet now I see you are a puny droid. (LOOOL) >OBI-WAN: Another landing haply made. Well done. >ANAKIN: Yet what is this: thou tremblest terribly: What is it ails thee, Padmé? Speak it plain? PADMÉ: I have such news as I would share with thee, Intelligence both sacred and profane: Thy child doth move within me, in my womb. (AAAAAAAH<3) >PAMDÉ: Thou are the gardener who brings increase, The tender of my soul who bringeth growth. Within thy love my blossom is at peace, And doth shoot forth upon mine Ani’s oath. ANAKIN: Nay, thou for thine own beauty are the cause, For thou are both the flower and the sun, Which bringeth light, sans hesitance or pause, And makes thee flourish such that thou dost stun. My love is but the witness to this growth, Mine heart is but observer to your beauty. This love, this heart, they are for thee, yea both— Thou mayest command them unto any duty. (If you can’t tell I’m a huge Anidala shipper) >YODA: Death natural is: To all who have life, it comes. Stop it thou canst not. Instead, be merry— Rejoice with those transforming Into the broad Force. >KI-ADI: What of the Wookiees, by the droids attack’d? What shall we do, this new threat to address? (All I can think about are the memes associated with this quote) **THE TRAGEDY OF DARTH PLAGUEIS THE WISE (aka one of the best parts)** PLAYER 3: The most lamentable and tragic tale Of one Darth Plagueis, he the Sith of old. A story of ambition that did fail, Of death that conquer’d over life: behold! PLAYER 1: Darth Plagueis I am call’d, and higher rise Than any Sith throughout the galaxy. PLAYER 2: Indeed, my love, most mighty and most wise: So may you e’re remain and always be. Yet what shall come of me if thee I lose? I tremble at the thought of your demise. Or what if Fate did come, and me did choose, How shall one live when that the other dies? PLAYER 1: It shall not be, I’ll pick the lock of death. By Force th’midi-chlorians I control, And have obtain’d the pow’r to grant a breath. In short: I can create life, by my soul. PLAYER 2: My love, thy knowledge of the dark side frights: Should any human have such learning, dear? PLAYER 1: Methinks thou shalt not fear my dazzling heights When I do rescue thee from death severe. ANAKIN: Pish! Pray, what is this tale of wonder, sir? PALPATINE: A story, lad, yet not as thou wouldst hear From Jedi mouths, for they would keep it hid. ‘Tis but an ancient legend of the Sith... PLAYER 1: The dark side of the Force is passing strong, A path to varied possibilities, E’en if, by some, they are consider’d wrong... PLAYER 3: The tragic tale of this Darth Plagueis ends Upon a hopeful moral all should heed: To save your family, to save your friends: ‘Tis possible if you with care proceed... PALPATINE: Ironic, is it not? The man could save His lov’d ones, but he could not save himself. ANAKIN: Is’t possible to learn this pow’r o’er death? PALPATINE: Not from a Jedi, nay. They fear the tale. >ANAKIN: My Master, let me speak: I fear that I Have giv’n you reason to be disappointed. Methinks I’ve not the proper gratitude Display’d for your great care in training me. I have been proud, and do apologize. ‘Tis my frustration with the Council that Hath color’d mine exchanges with you, sir. OBI-WAN: Thou are both passing strong and deeply wise, My dear friend Anakin. Of thee I’m proud. Thou have I train’d since thou wert a little boy, And taught thee ev’rything that I do know. Thou hast surpass’d me quite, and hast become An abler Jedi than my fondest hope. Be thou patient, gallant Anakin: I’ll warrant that, in time, the Council shall Bestow on thee the rank of Jedi Master. ANAKIN: Good Obi-Wan, as you depart: hear this: The Force shall ever be with you, my friend. OBI-WAN: Farewell, my loyal comrade Anakin, The Force be with thee till we meet again. >[Obi-Wan leaps from the balcony and lands next to Grevious] OBI-WAN: My greetings, General—we meet again. GREVIOUS: Ah, General Kenobi, you are bold. >OBI-WAN: The blaster—so unciviliz’d a thing, A random, clumsy weapon, by my troth. >PALPATINE: I am the Senate; aye, the Senate’s mine. >PALPATINE: ‘Tis treason, then, and I shall haply mete To each of you a traitor’s punishment. >PALPATINE: The Force is strong with thee, good Anakin, And thou a Sith impressive shalt become. Henceforce thou shalt be call’d a diff’rent name, A name that shall inspire both dread and fear In all who hear it utter’d: rise, Darth Vader. >PALPATINE: Behold the power of the mighty Sith As we release our order sixth-six! ... Come, death: thy name is order sixty-six. >R2-D2: Beep, meep, beep, squeak! C-3PO: —Tut, tut, droid—hush thy beeps. (Ok this quote makes me laugh but it’s also so important. If you look at the comic excerpt, R2 is actually very distressed and it’s so sad because R2 and Anakin have such a wholesome dynamic. It’s depressing that R2 has Droid PTSD) >R2-D2: My fear doth keep me here, in frozen state, Although the wind howls like a storm inside. O, let it go—fear not, but be at ease: The heat ne’er bother’d R2 anyway. (I’M SCREAMING) >PADMÉ: This thunderous applause sounds like a bell That hath been forg’d within hell’s own dark heart; With its sharp knell the hope of freedom dies. >SIDIOUS: How I have long’d for such a time as this, O, strange companion, small and weak and green. ‘Tis certain that the Jedi are extinct. YODA: Not if there is aught About these circumstances To which my voice speaks. WE’RE GETTING TO THE BEST QUOTES AHAAAA!! >VADER: Together, we shall rule the galaxy— Aye, thou and I, my sweet. This thought abides: What we desire, thus shall we make indeed. PADMÉ: What mine eats hear, my mind cannot believe: Thy words have neither rhyme nor reason, nay. Aye, Obi-Wan has it: thou are reliev’d Of ev’ry sense, tranform’d by thoughts insane. VADER: I’d hear no more of Obi-Wan tonight. The Jedi turn’d from me; do not the same. PADMÉ: Who is this who doth speak with tongue like knife? I tell thee truly, I know not thy name. Mine heart is broken by mind alteration; This path thou follow’st is not mine to walk. (*sobbing in the background*) >PAMDÉ: I prithee stop this now, and come thou back. I love thee still. VADER: —Thou, liar, shalt die soon: Thou didst bring him to kill me—‘tis a fact! >VADER: Now peaceful currents run because of me, Now freedom doth resound upon the flow, Now justice have I brought unto the deep, Now quick security both chart my way, Now I am admiral to Empire new. I am monarch of the sea: a Sith. OBI-WAN: An empire new—what chantey mad is this? VADER: Do not make me destroy you, Obi-Wan. OBI-WAN: My steadfast loyalty is to th’Republic, Unto democracy mind hull is moor’d. VADER: If you shall pilot by another path, You sink and are become mine enemy. OBI-WAN: None but a Sith would set his helm so straight, As though beset by terrors all around. A Jedi knoweth well the difference Betwixt a proper pride and misled hubris. A Jedi doth not deal in absolutes. I shall do what I must to see thee right. (THESE QUOTES HAVE SENT ME) >VADER: I should have known the Jedi would attempt To vanquish the Republic and seize pow’r. OBI-WAN: O, listen to thy words: the chancellor, E’en Palpatine, ‘tis he who evil is. VADER: Yet from a certain point of view—e’en mine— The Jedi are the base and evil ones. OBI-WAN: Then art thou lost indeed, my onetime friend. >OBI-WAN: ‘Tis finish’d Anakin, the triumph’s mine! Here I do claim the high ground, yea, and all The keen advantages it offereth. (HE HATH THE HIGH GROUND INDEED) >OBI-WAN: Thou wert the chosen one, who would destroy The Sith, not join their frightful company. Thou shouldst have brought new balance to the Force, Not leave it underneath a veil of dark. >OBI-WAN: —Lady, ‘tis your son. PADMÉ: He shall be Luke, and walk among the skies. Heart of mine heart, and issue of my love. ... OBI-WAN: —See, A daughter, too, a pair of children sweet. PADMÉ: ‘Tis Leia, who, like me, is royalty. Brave spirit, so remember thy sad mother. (This is even more sad because if you remember in Return of the Jedi, when Luke asks Leia about their real mother, she responds that she remember how sad her mother was...*SOBS INCREASE*) **This final monologue of Anakin physically becoming Darth Vader is so emotional** >VADER: This mask shall hide the man that I once was, Behind the mask my secret thoughts shall lay, Beneath the mask shall be my private lair, The mask, impenetrable, makes me free. Within the full security it gives I shall fulfill my radiant destiny: Bring balance to the Force as I do live A life of vengeance, power, and reward.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Wreade1872

    The tragedies that we have seen do reach Beyond the pale of what we humans should Endure, far worse than mine imagination... Well thank the Midi-chlorians thats over with. I really reget reading these in chronological order. At least i can move on to the original books now. On its own i might have only rated this a high 3 but grading on a curve its much better. Although for almost every big soliloquy added by the adaptor, giving much needed depth or clarity to the plot, there will inevitably follow The tragedies that we have seen do reach Beyond the pale of what we humans should Endure, far worse than mine imagination... Well thank the Midi-chlorians thats over with. I really reget reading these in chronological order. At least i can move on to the original books now. On its own i might have only rated this a high 3 but grading on a curve its much better. Although for almost every big soliloquy added by the adaptor, giving much needed depth or clarity to the plot, there will inevitably follow something clunky from the film that the adaptor couldn't change. I'm not even sure i've ever watched this one... i mean i've definitely seen parts of it but not sure if i've ever sat down and watched it start to end. The opening with the chancellor already kidnapped by General Grievous, who's i've barely heard of. I know he's from the cartoon but i mean who the hell thought that was a good idea? Anyway, the adaptor really tries but can't entirely pull the Darth Vader plot thread out of its tailspin. Still overall, the best of the worst.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    I don't think it's exactly a controversial opinion to say that Revenge of the Sith is the best of the three prequel movies. Seriously, what's the competition? So I expected to like the Shakespeare version the best of all of the prequels, and I certainly did. And I think reading all of the Shakespeare prequels has given me new appreciation for the actual prequels. There's a decent overarching plot buried under terrible dialog and a weak first installment, and Palpatine's machinations get spun out I don't think it's exactly a controversial opinion to say that Revenge of the Sith is the best of the three prequel movies. Seriously, what's the competition? So I expected to like the Shakespeare version the best of all of the prequels, and I certainly did. And I think reading all of the Shakespeare prequels has given me new appreciation for the actual prequels. There's a decent overarching plot buried under terrible dialog and a weak first installment, and Palpatine's machinations get spun out with more subtlety than most movies would bother with. At any rate, Doescher has done a great job with the first six Star Wars movie, and I'm interested to see what he'll do with the seventh.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    Now I've said this before with The Clone Army Attacketh and I'll say it again here: the low enjoyment level of this book came from the awful writing of the film itself. Ian Doescher did the best with what he was given. He did a great job with the theatrics of Anakin becoming Vader and Padme's 'woe is me' attitude. This movie was begging to be a Shakespeare play. Now I've said this before with The Clone Army Attacketh and I'll say it again here: the low enjoyment level of this book came from the awful writing of the film itself. Ian Doescher did the best with what he was given. He did a great job with the theatrics of Anakin becoming Vader and Padme's 'woe is me' attitude. This movie was begging to be a Shakespeare play.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Yoda speaks in haikus. Need I say more?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Caidyn (he/him/his)

    In 2005, when this came out, I was nine. This is the only one I distinctly remember watching in theaters. My biggest memory is the beginning and the end. Throughout the movie, my eyes were open wide with wonder because, holy shit, was this one action packed. Even as a kid, I loved the subtle changes of allegiance and I keenly felt the pain Padme had. (Probably because I had the hugest crush on her.) But, this one is my favorite of all the Star Wars movies. Hands down I love this one the best. Thi In 2005, when this came out, I was nine. This is the only one I distinctly remember watching in theaters. My biggest memory is the beginning and the end. Throughout the movie, my eyes were open wide with wonder because, holy shit, was this one action packed. Even as a kid, I loved the subtle changes of allegiance and I keenly felt the pain Padme had. (Probably because I had the hugest crush on her.) But, this one is my favorite of all the Star Wars movies. Hands down I love this one the best. This is no different with this book. With this one, since I love the movie, I was looking for subtle changes in the writing to give clues for different parts. And, I really loved the inclusion of specific lines from Shakespeare's plays that were adapted slightly for this. Specific thoughts: - Great use of Hamlet's plot with the play. I loved it and thought it was very well placed. - Darth Sidious's monologue in Act IV, Scene 1. Oh my god I started giggling like mad whenever I tried reading it outloud to myself (I do that with Shakespeare) in Sidious's voice. - I totally loved the way the couplets stopped rhyming with Padme and Anakin. I saw it coming, but it was so great to read it and just know the story behind why it was happening. Just a subtle change. - I wish I had read closer in the first couple books to see if Anakin typically used "thou" or "you" when speaking to Obi-Wan. I want to say he used "thou" and the "you" was specifically picked to show the rift in their closeness, but I can't be sure. - WHERE WAS JAR JAR?????? - All animals need to have lines, no matter how random the noises are.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    The dark fate of Anakin Skywalker is realized in “William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge” by Ian Doescher. The final prequel film was witness to the end of love and the rise of empire with little hope at the end, of which Doescher brings out in fantastic Elizabethan language just as Shakespeare would of if he had written it. The journey of Anakin into Darth Vader alongside the downfall of the Jedi and the Republic to a Sith-led Empire is the central arc of the entire book. Doescher’s The dark fate of Anakin Skywalker is realized in “William Shakespeare’s Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge” by Ian Doescher. The final prequel film was witness to the end of love and the rise of empire with little hope at the end, of which Doescher brings out in fantastic Elizabethan language just as Shakespeare would of if he had written it. The journey of Anakin into Darth Vader alongside the downfall of the Jedi and the Republic to a Sith-led Empire is the central arc of the entire book. Doescher’s use of Shakespeare’s play-within-a-play theme as Palpatine’s vehicle to steer Anakin to the dark side is well done and another impressive choice the author has made throughout this adaptation series. The use of the character Rumour throughout the prequels pays off in this book as this character of Fate is given a departing soliloquy during Anakin and Obi-Wan’s epic duel in Act V. The duel itself is handled masterfully with asides from both characters and direct dialogue between them. Though unable to intertwine the various scenes post-duel, Doescher is able to construct a suitable sequence in which they occur rapidly one upon another to great effect. The “Tragedy of the Sith’s Revenge” lives up to is heartbreaking title, but just as the film it ends with a little glimmer of hope. Doescher hints that he might be adapting the upcoming sequel trilogy, if this is the last adaptation of the Star Wars films into Elizabethan theater then like he begun the series Doescher ends it on a high.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jessamyn Leigh

    Shakespeare and Revenge of the Sith are basically a match made in heaven.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Another triumph. All the melodrama that doesn't work in the prequel movies works fantastically in a Shakespearean tragedy. This was a three star book for a while, but the fifth act hauled it up to a four. The first act is also great with the action. I was tempted to go whole hog with all five stars, but two acts can't carry the whole book. The fault isn't Doescher's; it's the source material again. You have to slog through some painful love scenes, but they're mercifully fewer than in The Clone Another triumph. All the melodrama that doesn't work in the prequel movies works fantastically in a Shakespearean tragedy. This was a three star book for a while, but the fifth act hauled it up to a four. The first act is also great with the action. I was tempted to go whole hog with all five stars, but two acts can't carry the whole book. The fault isn't Doescher's; it's the source material again. You have to slog through some painful love scenes, but they're mercifully fewer than in The Clone Army Attacketh. Reading the afterword first didn't provide any real gems to look out for this time, but all the elements from the previous installments were present in this one. Anakin and Padme' speak in rhyming quatrains until they break up when the quatrains become near-rhyming. Yoda still speaks in haiku, and I assume all of Mace Windu's parts made a reference to one of Samuel L. Jackson's movies. I missed most of these since Ian's probably dredging the bottom of the barrel to get unique films at this point. In fact, I caught only a couple: "Thou art a jumper in thy loyalties," "If this is true, then unto the Republic thou art a patriot; games play thou not: Art thou most certain Palpatine's the sith?" I didn't even remember him being in Patriot Games, but it's been years since I've seen it... No wait... I've never seen it. Clear and Present Danger was the Jack Ryan movie I've seen. Anyway, if you're a Jackson fan, you'll probably pick up a lot more than I did. You can tell Doescher had fun making this. He also inserts things that sound like they should be rooted in Shakespeare but actually come from somewhere else even if it's included in a soliloquy based on a Shakespearean play. E.g.: Vader telling Obi-Wan "I am the monarch of the sea: a Sith." "Monarch of the sea" is a familiar term, but not Shakespearean. It's the title of a song in the old Gilbert and Sullivan Opera H.M.S. Pinafore, though the phrase may have even been an old one when they wrote it; I don't know about that. I love these little gems and wish I had education enough to catch all of them. I'm sure this thing is just loaded with obscure references. A couple of things are explained in here that help connect some of the hey-that-doesn't-make-sense aspects of the original trilogy. Leia explains to Luke in Return of the Jedi that she barely remembers her "real" mother, and we should be amazed she remembers her at all since she died a couple minutes after Leia was born. But it turns out Padme' tells Leia "Brave spirit, do remember thy sad mother." I guess she took it to heart. I guess it's something like this a long, long time from now in a galaxy far closer to our own: "Remember." When Yoda bids Obi-Wan to see to Vader while he takes care of the Emperor, Obi-Wan is conflicted and gives us a soliloquy. Here's the second half: Mayhap what Yoda says hath seeds of truth: The Anakin I knew is come to naught And hath been slain by Vader's presence vile. Is this but rationalization, or Is it some higher wisdom I may trust? Methinks one day I may believe 'tis true- When thought of from a certain point of view. This explains his misdirection of the truth in episode IV and the explanation in episode VI. Hit us with another pearl of wisdom, Obi, with a reworking (and improvment) of one of my favorite quotes in this film. None but a Sith would set his helm so straight, As though beset by terrors all around. A Jedi knoweth well the difference Betwixt a proper pride and misled hubris. A Jedi doth not deal in absolutes. As Vader lay slow roasting on Mustafar, he gives us a pretty bleak outlook on life, but who can blame him? He had a pretty rough go of things in this tale even if he brought it on himself. I'll leave you with a bit of that soliloquy. This life - this horrid, gods-forsaken life- Hath been but years of endless misery. If this is what we humans may expect- This turmoil that befalls each human life- 'Twere better that we slay each newborn babe That enters this horrendous galaxy. For certain, I unto the Jedi Younglings Did grant a sweet and premature release From all the toil that life could offer them. O, that someone would do the same for me, Would come and slay me as I suffer here. Like I said at the start, the melodrama which makes me cringe in the movie works wonderfully here. Solid recommendation for this and all six nine books in this series if you like Shakespeare and Star Wars. I hope he gives the new movies this treatment. (2/16/20 update: Hope realized.)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Erikka

    These books are like Mystery Science Theater for someone who isn't a big Star Wars fan. Take something meh, make it awesome. I missed the aside from a random character that made me laugh in the other books, but I know he had a great deal to cram into this story. I enjoyed the callback to Shakespeare's play within a play, the subtlety of Palpatine's coercion, and the great coverage of Obi-wan and Anakin's big battle entirely in asides. That made a scene with little speaking both easy to follow an These books are like Mystery Science Theater for someone who isn't a big Star Wars fan. Take something meh, make it awesome. I missed the aside from a random character that made me laugh in the other books, but I know he had a great deal to cram into this story. I enjoyed the callback to Shakespeare's play within a play, the subtlety of Palpatine's coercion, and the great coverage of Obi-wan and Anakin's big battle entirely in asides. That made a scene with little speaking both easy to follow and very funny (at least to me. Seriously, picture them as actors on a stage narrating every move. It's hilarious). Thank you, Ian, for these books. They are amazing and I look forward to 7-9.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Karin

    Once again, Doescher does a fabulous job, but the story of the movie is just bleah or blah for me (I am no longer ever sure which one to use because I didn't grow up with "blah"). Plus, of course, I had no desire to watch Anakim go down the dark path to becoming the dark one even knowing all along this would happen. Etc. Not as bad as the clone army one, but close. Nevertheless, this would be quite fun in a dramatized audiobook. Once again, Doescher does a fabulous job, but the story of the movie is just bleah or blah for me (I am no longer ever sure which one to use because I didn't grow up with "blah"). Plus, of course, I had no desire to watch Anakim go down the dark path to becoming the dark one even knowing all along this would happen. Etc. Not as bad as the clone army one, but close. Nevertheless, this would be quite fun in a dramatized audiobook.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    really good, so much like a Shakespearean tragedy actually VERDICT: In Shakespeare-style, Star Wars comes to a close with this dramatic last book in the series. Its revenge and tragic characters will make you rediscover both works with a new perspective. Masterful. see my full review: http://wordsandpeace.com/2015/09/04/b... really good, so much like a Shakespearean tragedy actually VERDICT: In Shakespeare-style, Star Wars comes to a close with this dramatic last book in the series. Its revenge and tragic characters will make you rediscover both works with a new perspective. Masterful. see my full review: http://wordsandpeace.com/2015/09/04/b...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Hawkins

    Such a great ending to such a great series!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Natália

    I don't know if it's me that is not in the mood for it or if this book is indeed too slow for a funny play...it's my favorite episode from the second trilogy. I'm kind of disappointed :( I don't know if it's me that is not in the mood for it or if this book is indeed too slow for a funny play...it's my favorite episode from the second trilogy. I'm kind of disappointed :(

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emiloid

    I just loved this. Revenge of the Sith is my favorite Star Wars film so I had a high bar set and it didn't disappoint! I could read a whole book of Anakin and Padme rhyming lines with each other, I love those two so much, and the scene where they fall apart is just as heartbreaking as it is in the film. I also continue to love the Easter eggs Ian Doescher slips in. R2 randomly makes a "Frozen" reference, and the line "a certain point of view" is played on several times. If I would make one impro I just loved this. Revenge of the Sith is my favorite Star Wars film so I had a high bar set and it didn't disappoint! I could read a whole book of Anakin and Padme rhyming lines with each other, I love those two so much, and the scene where they fall apart is just as heartbreaking as it is in the film. I also continue to love the Easter eggs Ian Doescher slips in. R2 randomly makes a "Frozen" reference, and the line "a certain point of view" is played on several times. If I would make one improvement to the book, I would have given Padme more lines about her mental state before she dies of grief, and Anakin more inner narration as he's being transformed into Vader. It's super important that their deaths, both literal and metaphorical, parallel each other. But it's RotS, I was bound to be picky about what I wanted to be acknowledged.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Allie

    “Chancellor Palpatine, Sith Lords are our specialty” in Shakespeare speak becomes—> “with due respect, O Chancellor, Sith Lords the keenest object of our study are. We two are specialists in their domain” 😂 Nicely done

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Well, even Doescher can't make the plot stupidity work (why does Padme have to retire when she becomes a mum for instance). But to give Doescher credit he at least tries to go after Order 66. Well, even Doescher can't make the plot stupidity work (why does Padme have to retire when she becomes a mum for instance). But to give Doescher credit he at least tries to go after Order 66.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Daisy

    I really enjoyed this play. Unlike the previous two instalments, it really felt like it fit into the Shakespeare format - allowing Doescher to use his awesome action writing and flawless character development skills to the the full. All the soliloquys he added really helped dig into what the characters were thinking (and cut out the scenes of sitting in silence, yay!) and the remodelling of Shakespeare quotes and scenes worked so well for me (Palpatine's parody of Hamlet's play-within-a-play in I really enjoyed this play. Unlike the previous two instalments, it really felt like it fit into the Shakespeare format - allowing Doescher to use his awesome action writing and flawless character development skills to the the full. All the soliloquys he added really helped dig into what the characters were thinking (and cut out the scenes of sitting in silence, yay!) and the remodelling of Shakespeare quotes and scenes worked so well for me (Palpatine's parody of Hamlet's play-within-a-play in particular was so creative). Honestly I thought this was a perfect adaptation which has given me new appreciation for the film it was based on.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    “Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them.” Ian Doescher has achieved greatness with this Shakespeare Star Wars series. They are seriously some of the most brilliant books I’ve ever read. I don’t know how he does it, because I hate whiny Anakin in the prequel trilogy, but Doescher manages to make him a sympathetic character. I could feel the conflict in him in a way that I was not able to feel in the movie. Padme dying for love was less pathetic than “Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them.” Ian Doescher has achieved greatness with this Shakespeare Star Wars series. They are seriously some of the most brilliant books I’ve ever read. I don’t know how he does it, because I hate whiny Anakin in the prequel trilogy, but Doescher manages to make him a sympathetic character. I could feel the conflict in him in a way that I was not able to feel in the movie. Padme dying for love was less pathetic than in the movie, and Obi-Wan’s love of Anakin was much more obvious here. And - he even made a reference to FROZEN!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Booth

    Out of the entire series, I felt this book worked the best. The Revenge of the Sith really is a story based on tragedy, so that theme fits the Shakespearean mood. It was a solid end to the prequels, and the dialogue we hear from Palpatine as he reveals himself is simply awesome. I hope Doescher continues on with books 7, 8, and 9.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jacki

    I love any book that takes a classic or cult hit and puts a literary spin on it, and this book did exactly that. Hilarious to read Yoda speak with a Shakespearian twist. I think any Star Wars fan who appreciates literature will love this book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    meghann

    This is the sixth book in the series I've read, and I love them all. I'm so excited for The Force Doth Awaken to come out in a couple of months. I really want to see how a Kylo Ren temper tantrum is done via Shakespeare. <3 This is the sixth book in the series I've read, and I love them all. I'm so excited for The Force Doth Awaken to come out in a couple of months. I really want to see how a Kylo Ren temper tantrum is done via Shakespeare. <3

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jon Barr

    Quite well done. This entire series is gold!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chris Greensmith

    “O, let it go—fear not, but be at ease: The heat ne’er bother’d R2 anyway.”

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tanner

    The thrilling conclusion to the Prequel Trilogy is made even more thrilling here. What was already textbook shakespearean tragedy is taken to new heights thanks to Doescher’s expert translations into Shakespeare’s style and verse. The effect of wordplay and rhyming is even more evident here than it was in previous entries to this trilogy, most notably in the relationship between Anakin and Padme. Their rhyming couplets start off very tight, but when Anakin goes dark and Padme is confronted with The thrilling conclusion to the Prequel Trilogy is made even more thrilling here. What was already textbook shakespearean tragedy is taken to new heights thanks to Doescher’s expert translations into Shakespeare’s style and verse. The effect of wordplay and rhyming is even more evident here than it was in previous entries to this trilogy, most notably in the relationship between Anakin and Padme. Their rhyming couplets start off very tight, but when Anakin goes dark and Padme is confronted with this, the scheme begins to become imperfect - which itself is a perfect way of illustrating their demise. The fact that Shakespearean tropes are so common in the source material does mean that Doescher does not alter things as greatly as he did in the past books to accommodate the themes. In fact, it seems like he removes some of the more awkward parts of the films - namely, many of the battles Palpatine is involved in become much more serious as Palpatine is able to establish himself as a genuine threat. Characterization is also stronger thanks to the ability to hear the character’s innermost thoughts - what once seemed like sudden shifts make much more sense once we’re able to see the inner gradualness of it all. Most notably is Doescher’s ability to slowly make the atmosphere darker and darker in accordance with the themes of the tale. An oncoming sense of dread felt by the characters hits us as well, and even though we all know exactly what lies at the end of this story we can’t help but hope that somehow things will be a bit lighter. Spoiler: they are not. There are some aspects of this retelling that I personally disliked, but objectively I could not find any true fault in here. It’s an excellent update to the source.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adysnewbox

    Reading the William Shakespeare's Star Wars series has been delightful and fun. They aren't just "gimmick" books; they are well thought out and carefully crafted, and they contain many wonderful details. I do not much care for the Star Wars prequel films; but, written out in iambic pentameter, I have actually come to appreciate their stories better. I think there were a lot of great IDEAS in the Star Wars prequels; they were just lost in the midst of flat direction, stilted acting, and floods of Reading the William Shakespeare's Star Wars series has been delightful and fun. They aren't just "gimmick" books; they are well thought out and carefully crafted, and they contain many wonderful details. I do not much care for the Star Wars prequel films; but, written out in iambic pentameter, I have actually come to appreciate their stories better. I think there were a lot of great IDEAS in the Star Wars prequels; they were just lost in the midst of flat direction, stilted acting, and floods of over-the-top CGI. "Tragedy of the Sith's Revenge" may actually have been the EASIEST for Mr. Doescher to write; the plot is a classic Shakespeare tragedy, featuring fallen heroes, doomed love interests, conniving politicians, and friends who can only stand by and watch everything fall apart, unable to do anything to avert the tragedy. There are betrayals, secrets, murder most foul...it's perfect! I actually felt pity for Anakin/Vader, Obi-Wan, Padme, Yoda, and the rest. Through the magic of soliloquy, the motivations of the characters all carried more weight and made more sense than when the same story was potrayed on the big screen. Kudos for Mr. Doescher to making me care about the Star Wars prequels again! (Not enough to actually WATCH them again, though...)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ebster Davis

    My favorite part was The Tragedy of Darth Plaguis the Wise. Its cool to think that its an actual established legend in the Star Wars universe (and not something that just barely happened, like, 20 years earlier). It even sounds like it should be a play, just by the title! One part that was really creepy was (view spoiler)[ when Anakin killed the younglings. That already should be creepy enough, but Mr Doescher added a new level of freakiness to it. Very Shakespeare.... (hide spoiler)] Notes: I re My favorite part was The Tragedy of Darth Plaguis the Wise. Its cool to think that its an actual established legend in the Star Wars universe (and not something that just barely happened, like, 20 years earlier). It even sounds like it should be a play, just by the title! One part that was really creepy was (view spoiler)[ when Anakin killed the younglings. That already should be creepy enough, but Mr Doescher added a new level of freakiness to it. Very Shakespeare.... (hide spoiler)] Notes: I really would have liked it if they'd used clones as the "two fools" conversation, either in this book or in the clone army attacketh. I feel like there's a missed opportunity there, but then the movies didn't focus a whole lot on the clones anyway.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kat - ahobbitsbooks

    I very much enjoyed this book. It's a perfect combination of Shakespeare's use of language and writing style and the happenings of "Revenge of the Sith". Doescher stayed very close to the movie, which was great in my opinion, so you were able to recognize the actual lines the characters said in the film. There are a lot of hidden references too, some made me laugh out loud! It is fantastic how Doescher not only maintained Shakespeare's writing style, but also his great puns, his humour and his wi I very much enjoyed this book. It's a perfect combination of Shakespeare's use of language and writing style and the happenings of "Revenge of the Sith". Doescher stayed very close to the movie, which was great in my opinion, so you were able to recognize the actual lines the characters said in the film. There are a lot of hidden references too, some made me laugh out loud! It is fantastic how Doescher not only maintained Shakespeare's writing style, but also his great puns, his humour and his wit. I quite enjoyed the drawings as well! The characters were even given period clothing! This is a must-read for every Star Wars and Shakespeare fan alike!

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