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Pulled Over: How Police Stops Define Race and Citizenship

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In sheer numbers, no form of government control comes close to the police stop. Each year, twelve percent of drivers in the United States are stopped by the police, and the figure is almost double among racial minorities. Police stops are among the most recognizable and frequently criticized incidences of racial profiling, but, while numerous studies have shown that minori In sheer numbers, no form of government control comes close to the police stop. Each year, twelve percent of drivers in the United States are stopped by the police, and the figure is almost double among racial minorities. Police stops are among the most recognizable and frequently criticized incidences of racial profiling, but, while numerous studies have shown that minorities are pulled over at higher rates, none have examined how police stops have come to be both encouraged and institutionalized. Pulled Over deftly traces the strange history of the investigatory police stop, from its discredited beginning as “aggressive patrolling” to its current status as accepted institutional practice. Drawing on the richest study of police stops to date, the authors show that who is stopped and how they are treated convey powerful messages about citizenship and racial disparity in the United States. For African Americans, for instance, the experience of investigatory stops erodes the perceived legitimacy of police stops and of the police generally, leading to decreased trust in the police and less willingness to solicit police assistance or to self-censor in terms of clothing or where they drive. This holds true even when police are courteous and respectful throughout the encounters and follow seemingly colorblind institutional protocols. With a growing push in recent years to use local police in immigration efforts, Hispanics stand poised to share African Americans’ long experience of investigative stops.   In a country that celebrates democracy and racial equality, investigatory stops have a profound and deleterious effect on African American and other minority communities that merits serious reconsideration. Pulled Over offers practical recommendations on how reforms can protect the rights of citizens and still effectively combat crime.


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In sheer numbers, no form of government control comes close to the police stop. Each year, twelve percent of drivers in the United States are stopped by the police, and the figure is almost double among racial minorities. Police stops are among the most recognizable and frequently criticized incidences of racial profiling, but, while numerous studies have shown that minori In sheer numbers, no form of government control comes close to the police stop. Each year, twelve percent of drivers in the United States are stopped by the police, and the figure is almost double among racial minorities. Police stops are among the most recognizable and frequently criticized incidences of racial profiling, but, while numerous studies have shown that minorities are pulled over at higher rates, none have examined how police stops have come to be both encouraged and institutionalized. Pulled Over deftly traces the strange history of the investigatory police stop, from its discredited beginning as “aggressive patrolling” to its current status as accepted institutional practice. Drawing on the richest study of police stops to date, the authors show that who is stopped and how they are treated convey powerful messages about citizenship and racial disparity in the United States. For African Americans, for instance, the experience of investigatory stops erodes the perceived legitimacy of police stops and of the police generally, leading to decreased trust in the police and less willingness to solicit police assistance or to self-censor in terms of clothing or where they drive. This holds true even when police are courteous and respectful throughout the encounters and follow seemingly colorblind institutional protocols. With a growing push in recent years to use local police in immigration efforts, Hispanics stand poised to share African Americans’ long experience of investigative stops.   In a country that celebrates democracy and racial equality, investigatory stops have a profound and deleterious effect on African American and other minority communities that merits serious reconsideration. Pulled Over offers practical recommendations on how reforms can protect the rights of citizens and still effectively combat crime.

54 review for Pulled Over: How Police Stops Define Race and Citizenship

  1. 5 out of 5

    hayden

    a convincing compilation of evidence, though its redundancy made it sloughy at times

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Wyss

    An excellent analysis of the racism inherent in investigatory stops (a concept that i didn't even have before starting this book). Definitely an academic study, but one that uses both quantitative and qualitative data and that's not unreadable. If you can handle academic books, this one is 100% worth your time. An excellent analysis of the racism inherent in investigatory stops (a concept that i didn't even have before starting this book). Definitely an academic study, but one that uses both quantitative and qualitative data and that's not unreadable. If you can handle academic books, this one is 100% worth your time.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brianna Herndon-Sotelo

    Important thesis but highly redundant. You could basically read chapters 1, 2, and 8 and would understand the arguments of the whole book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Read for work, and it is very specific, but I was fully persuaded by it and found it compelling.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amy Carrigan

    This book provides statistical analysis of something I've been aware of for a long long time - the vast difference in the way police engage white and black citizens. It's unsettling on so many levels to see it right there in, ahem, black and white. The authors mostly prove 'it's a thing' which is probably completely unnecessary to a person inclined to read this book. This book provides statistical analysis of something I've been aware of for a long long time - the vast difference in the way police engage white and black citizens. It's unsettling on so many levels to see it right there in, ahem, black and white. The authors mostly prove 'it's a thing' which is probably completely unnecessary to a person inclined to read this book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jade Dill

    Read for SOC 4125: Policing America

  7. 4 out of 5

    Maddie

  8. 5 out of 5

    Zach Powell

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa

  10. 5 out of 5

    Samuel Davis

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michael Gizzi

  12. 5 out of 5

    Savannah

  13. 4 out of 5

    Keith

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sydney Johnson

  15. 5 out of 5

    John Bloom

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Brown

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nick Urciuoli

  18. 4 out of 5

    Daniel DeButts

  19. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Blanks

  22. 5 out of 5

    Hadar Aviram

  23. 4 out of 5

    gracie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sam Pluff

  25. 5 out of 5

    Abigail Roston

  26. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Davin

  28. 4 out of 5

    Maryanne Alderson

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mary Whisner

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lori

  31. 4 out of 5

    Rolf

  32. 5 out of 5

    Dania

  33. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  34. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

  35. 5 out of 5

    Anna Kramer

  36. 4 out of 5

    Kirk Shack Jr.

  37. 4 out of 5

    AT

  38. 5 out of 5

    Kerra

  39. 4 out of 5

    Rebeccaanderson2010

  40. 4 out of 5

    Michele

  41. 5 out of 5

    Vignesh Ramachandran

  42. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Rauk

  43. 4 out of 5

    Kerry

  44. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Haynes

  45. 5 out of 5

    Tess

  46. 4 out of 5

    Spunshadows

  47. 5 out of 5

    Madelina Dirar

  48. 4 out of 5

    Maddy Schiller

  49. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  50. 5 out of 5

    Grant Gallaher

  51. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Wilson

  52. 4 out of 5

    Kassidi Jones

  53. 4 out of 5

    Middlesex Community

  54. 5 out of 5

    Scotty795

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